Category Archives: English 10

English 10-1 Final Exam

This final exam will be two written responses: one creative narrative AND one expository literary response to Shakespeare. Divide your time 50/50 between the two, I offer.

Total time: 2.5 hours

Written Response #1: Narrative

The first response must be a narrative – but here are the rules. Your narrative elements – setting, characters, conflicts, symbols – must be synthesized from characters, settings, conflicts, and symbols studied in literature in this course. You can write in first-person or third person point of view.

Consider the following prompt to get you started:

While on the Easter 2020 STJ school field trip to Italy you experience a “pan-dimensional paradox in the space-time construct.” At a moment where you are witness to a rioting crowd outside a soccer stadium in Rome, you see a flash of light and characters from ELA 10 (characters you have added to your imagination from film, plays, novels, and stories you have studied) begin appearing in the scene. You see a noble character suffer evil consequences for attempting to show empathy for the well-being of another. The scene closes when you notice a “sixty-something-year-old” man holding a pen and a notebook. He gives you a solemn wink and a nod.

AND

Written Response #2: Expository Literary Essay

The second response must be an expository essay about a character’s decision to choose action over apathy. Here are the rules. Your essay must be on Shakespeare’s play, Julius Caesar. It must be at least 5 paragraphs. You must give specific examples, reasons, and details from the work to explain the nature of at least one character’s decision(s) to chose action over apathy.

Using specific references to the play Julius Caesar explain how a character(s) chose action over apathy. How and why must s/he act upon his/her knowledge, values, and abilities for the well-being of others?

Rubric 1: Narrative

Rubric 2: Essay

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English 10-1 Final Exam 1

This final exam will be two written responses: one creative narrative AND one expository literary response to Shakespeare. Divide your time 50/50 between the two, I offer.

Total time: 2.5 hours

Written Response #1: Narrative

The first response must be a narrative – but here are the rules. Your narrative elements – setting, characters, conflicts, symbols – must be synthesized from characters, settings, conflicts, and symbols studied in literature in this course. You can write in first-person or third person point of view.

Consider the following prompt to get you started:

While on the Easter 2020 STJ school field trip to Italy you experience a “pan-dimensional paradox in the space-time construct.” At a moment where you are witness to a rioting crowd outside a soccer stadium in Rome, you see a flash of light and characters from ELA 10 (characters you have added to your imagination from film, plays, novels, and stories you have studied) begin appearing in the scene. You see a noble character suffer evil consequences for attempting to show empathy for the well-being of another. The scene closes when you notice a “sixty-something-year-old” man holding a pen and a notebook. He gives you a solemn wink and a nod.

AND

Written Response #2: Expository Literary Essay

The second response must be an expository essay about a character’s decision to choose action over apathy. Here are the rules. Your essay must be on Shakespeare’s play, Julius Caesar. It must be at least 5 paragraphs. You must give specific examples, reasons, and details from the work to explain the nature of at least one character’s decision(s) to chose action over apathy.

Using specific references to the play Julius Caesar explain how a character(s) chose action over apathy. How and why must s/he act upon his/her knowledge, values, and abilities for the well-being of others?

Rubric 1: Narrative

Rubric 2: Essay

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Lord of the Flies Written Response

Read Lord of the Flies by William Golding.

Choose one of the following approaches as a final written response to the novel:

1. Write a 5 Paragraph Essay: How do we live with the consequences of our decision making?

or

2. Write Chapter 13: “Gift of the Goddess.” Write a final chapter to the novel that begins with the last paragraph of Chapter 12. Maintain an omniscient point of view. Consider the following ideas (you do not have to use any of them).

  • The officer may or may be familiar with Ralph’s father.
  • The officer reveals to the survivors that the rescue ship has a morgue with two corpses.
  • The rescue ship has a telegraph which allows the Officer to send a message home to the boys parents.
  • There is a Catholic priest – a Chaplan – on the ship for the boys to talk to.
  • The damage caused by WW 2 is real, not fictional. The world has sustained only damage that is indeed historically accurate.
  • The boys have been missing 40 days.
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ELA 10-1, 10-2, 10-4 Final (Sader, and only Sader)

The Hero’s Journey.

Suggested Time: 2.5 Hours
Use Microsoft Word, no internet access.

Create a short story from the point of view of one hero you have studied this semester.

Put that character into a new “hero’s journey.”

Here’s the catch, all elements of your new short story ought to be inspired by what you have studied this semester. All characters (hero, guardian(s), helper(s), mentor) in your story must be inspired by any other story/film/play characters you have studied. As well, the call to adventure, supernatural aid, threshold, transformation, challenges, temptations, abyss, revelation, atonements and return ought to be inspired by elements studied in any film/story/play studied in ELA 10.

Consider bringing into your story characters, settings, plots, conflicts from the following sources:

  • Julius Caesar by Willam Shakespeare
  • Hanna
  • “I’ve Got Gloria” by M.E. Kerr
  • “The Adventurous Life of John Goddard” by Sturart McLean
  • “War” by Timothy Findley
  • “Superman’s Song” by Brad Roberts
  • “The Michelle I Know” by Alison Lohans
  • “The Conversation of Birds” by Jean Yoon
  • “The Sniper” by Liam O’Flaherty

Rubric

Example Plan:

Hero: Hanna – a thirty-something year-old unmarried and unhappy Social Studies teacher at Archbishop Jordan High School.
Call to Adventure: Skydiving at the Edmonton Skydiving Centre
Supernatural Aid: iPhone X with face recognition technology, and a weather app with notifications turned on.
Helpers, Guardians, Antagonists: there are several other “characters” in the story: all similar to characters studied in English 10. A man with an unusually large gap in his front teeth, a women dressed in green, and someone carrying an empty dog crate. One of the skydivers collects Superman comics, one has a sister battling cancer, one remained back on the ground because he is afraid of ducks. You get the idea.

Rough idea: The plane goes up and everything seems normal, a storm appears, then the plane appears to be heading directly at the capital where the new premier (a popular red-haired fellow with a large gap in his front teeth, but embroiled in a scandal where protesters in Fort MacMurray where injured) is about the speak in front of a noisy crowd. As the plane hurtles toward the Legislature, clues begin to emerge that a conspiracy to cause havoc and mayhem is underway …

 

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2016 ELA 10 Final Exam

Consider the following two pages of prompts. Then complete ONE the writing assignments.

Equality–Pain and Pride

 

Environment and Technology–Reality and Responsibility

 

Assignment (choose one):

  1. Write a narrative or essay in which you examine the pain and pride in being human.  OR
  2. Write a narrative or essay in which you examine how the environment influences life and shapes human feelings and opinions.

Rubric:

Tips:

  • Enhance your writing with connections to ideas in news, history, culture, music, philosophy, religion, politics, sports, and/or society in your exploration.
  • Enhance your writing with connections to ideas in any texts/media you have studied.
  • Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization.
  • Enhance the clarity and artistry of communication, make it clear and interesting.
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Questions to Consider for Hamlet

  1. What troubles Hamlet at the opening of the play?
  2. When Horatio tells Hamlet about the apparition, who does Hamlet think it might be? What does he decide to do? What type of omen does Hamlet think the apparition is?
  3. Describe Hamlet’s meeting with the ghost. Who is the ghost? Why has it appeared? What does the ghost tell Hamlet to do? What might be some other reasons for the ghost appearing?
  4. Why does Hamlet act as if he were mad? Why does Polonius think the reason for the madness is? Do you agree with him? Why or why not?
  5. How does Claudius react to the performance of The Murder of Gonzago? Why? What does his reaction convince Hamlet of?
  6. Describe Claudius and Gertrude. What does each think of Hamlet? How does each treat him? What does Hamlet think of them?
  7. Why does Hamlet kill Polonius? How does Hamlet act after he finds out who he killed? What is your opinion of his actions?
  8. How does Claudius feel about what he did to King Hamlet? As he is praying, Hamlet entry with his sword drawn. Why doesn’t he kill Claudius?
  9. Why does Claudius decide to send Hamlet to England? What does he plan for Hamlet’s arrival there? What happens instead?
  10. How does Claudius hope to eliminate Hamlet during the Prince’s duel with Laertes? Describe what happens during the duel?
  11. Would you describe Hamlet as a tragic hero? Why or why not?
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So I have been thinking about technology … and invisible gorillas

At some point in this post I wanted you to watch a video demonstrations called simply, “The Monkey Business Illusion.” But instead of risking you scrolling down, playing right away, and missing whatever else I’ve written between here and there, let’s get the video out of the way now. But come back and read what I have written after the video plays.

One of my students brought “The Monkey Business Illusion” video to my attention during a discussion of the materialist philosopher, Democritus. How did we get to talking about gorillas? I’m not certain, but that we were talking about how our perceptions of nature – not just the little things, but the big things too – can be tricked. Until our attention is focused on a particular change or transformation, we do not see it occurring. If we are only looking for the material causes in nature, we will find them, but our perceptions will be limited by our attention span. Just as in the video, we miss not only the altering of little details, but huge events are occurring and we simply miss them – yet they are right there, like the invisible gorilla – mocking us when we discover our foolishness in not noticing changes the first time around.

Now, at almost the same time I was typing up a couple creative writing ideas on the topic of technology when another student came to to tell me about her Dad and an email “faux pas“. Her dad had almost sent an email without spell-checking it and to his chagrin discovered he came close to sending out a message to his staff in which he had a “u” where he should have had “you”. We both agreed that in the “old days” before email/texting, a handwritten or typewritten memo would have never contained such a trivial but monumentally embarrassing typo. But the “u” was there, he had typed it and it bothered him when he saw it – like the invisible gorilla – mocking him.

So, here are the topics I have been thinking about when I put these ideas into collision:

  1. Read and write a response to The Chimney Sweeper
  2. Write a response to any other prompt I have on technology

Whatever topic you write about please take some time to address the following question as well: Is technology making us more perceptive of the world around us or is it just getting in the way of seeing the things that matter most?

Piano Mirror Illusion by Shigeo Fukuda

Piano Mirror Illusion by Shigeo Fukuda

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ELA 10 Final Essay Topics

English Language Arts 10 Final Essay Topics

ELA 10-1

Your response can be in the form of a narrative or essay.

In Julius Caesar, we have many people working together for various reasons and with varying degrees of success. Most of the relationships have tension in them and all are marked with conflicting pressures, values, and consequences that surround decision making.

Choose any two characters that have a close relationship and examine the effect of their decisions on their relationship. Consider carefully how the decisions of these characters are affected by three of the following “big ideas”: power, fate and free will, friendship, art and culture, gender, manipulation, pride, principles.

Brutus and Cassius

or

Brutus and Portia

or

Caesar and Antony

or

Antony and Octavius

 

ELA 10-2

Your response can be in the form of a narrative or essay

Write a narrative or essay in which you examine conflicting pressures, values, and consequences that surround decision making. Connect to news, history, culture, religion, politics, sports, and/or society in your exploration of the decisions that surround the use of violence.

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ELA 10 Midterm Assignment

When you have to make a choice and don’t make it, that is in itself a choice. -William James

Read carefully the two short stories, The Sniper by O’Flaherty and Araby by James Joyce.

Write a post in response to one of these stories in which you discuss the idea(s) the author suggests to you about decisions.

Consider the rubric:

Tips General:
This assignment should allow you to showcase your expository writing skills. As well, you should consider relevant items for your discussion from your Short Story Study Guide. Show how the author builds interest/intensity about decisions through the use of literal (information, vocabulary, conflict, etc) figurative (symbolism, irony, allusion, etc) and archetypal elements.

Tips Extra:
The rubric will reward discussions which incorporate philosophical ideas in general. This task would be an excellent opportunity to quibble about existential ideals specifically.

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