Category Archives: English 20

English 10-1 Final Exam 2

This final exam will be a CHOICE of two written responses: one creative narrative OR one expository literary response to Shakespeare.

Total time: 2.5 hours

Written Response #1: Narrative

The first response must be a narrative – but here are the rules. Your narrative elements – setting, characters, conflicts, symbols – must be synthesized from characters, settings, conflicts, and symbols studied in literature in this course. You can write in first-person or third person point of view.

Consider the following prompt to get you started:

While on the Easter 2020 STJ school field trip to Italy you experience a “pan-dimensional paradox in the space-time construct.” At a moment where you are witness to a rioting crowd outside a soccer stadium in Rome, you see a flash of light and characters from ELA 10 (characters you have added to your imagination from film, plays, novels, and stories you have studied) begin appearing in the scene. You see a noble character suffer evil consequences for attempting to show empathy for the well-being of another. The scene closes when you notice a “sixty-something-year-old” man holding a pen and a notebook. He gives you a solemn wink and a nod.

OR

Written Response #2: Expository Literary Essay

The second response must be an expository essay about a character’s decision to choose action over apathy. Here are the rules. Your essay must be on Shakespeare’s play, Julius Caesar. It must be at least 5 paragraphs. You must give specific examples, reasons, and details from the work to explain the nature of at least one character’s decision(s) to chose action over apathy.

Using specific references to the play Julius Caesar explain how a character(s) chose action over apathy. How and why must s/he act upon his/her knowledge, values, and abilities for the well-being of others?

Rubric 1: Narrative

Rubric 2: Essay

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In Camera: English 20-1 Final Exam

Imagine a mysterious room. In the room there are three people waiting. The three people are deceased. The room then is a depiction of the afterlife. A character from Shakespeare’s Macbeth has spent a long time alone before eventually being joined by a short story character from the Imprints 11 anthology. Soon after, a character from Huxley’s Brave New World arrives. The characters are being punished by spending eternity locked in a room together – only one of them seems not to have figured that out yet. The room is plain, modern, no decorations. There is a subtle aroma of fresh lavender; there are no torture devices, no fire, no brimstone. The furniture is simple, a large square coffee table surrounded by a red leather sectional sofa. There is a door from which they all entered, but when any one of them attempts to leave alone, they cannot – turned back by a non-speaking genderless character whose distinguishing feature is that they have no eyelids. One of them sings to break the silence, one seems especially unwilling to admit to any wrongdoing, and the remaining one is relentlessly optimistic that there is a way for them all to escape.

Realize this idea as a narrative using very little dialogue or as a stage play with very little stage direction.

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ELA 20-1 Final Exam

DIRECTIONS: Write a well-organized composition on the topic below.

Write an essay, arguing how a Canadian poem you have studied is indeed “rooted in Canada and has drawn its essential characteristics from there”(Northrop Frye – from “Preface to ‘The Bush Garden'”).

Using specific references from the poem and Frye, explain the poem’s “essential characteristics,” the way they shape the discussion of figurative elements of the poem, and their importance to the overall theme of the poem.

As you write your composition, remember to:

  • Give the title and the author of the poem.
  • Focus on a poem’s “essential characteristics.”
  • Give specific examples, reasons, and details from the poem and Frye to explain the poem’s “essential characteristics,” the way they shape the discussion of the figurative elements of the poem, and their importance to the overall theme of the poem.
  • Write in complete sentences.
  • Write coherent and well-developed paragraphs.
  • Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization.

Hints for “figurative elements of the poem”:

  • Identify emotionally charged words.
  • Explain any images/actions that can be interpreted as symbols/archetypes and defend your choice.
  • Explain any use of poetic devices: repetition, couplet, rhyme, simile, metaphor, personification, hyperbole, juxtaposition, alliteration, irony, stanza, meter, synechdoche, pun, paradox, image, symbol, archetype.

 

Choose your poem from The Essential Canadian Poem list

 

Expository Literary Essay Plan

Expository Literary Essay Plan

Critical Response Rubric

Critical Response Rubric

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2015 ELA 20-2 Final Exam: Suffer

He drew a circle that shut me out —
Heretic, rebel, a thing to flout.
But Love and I had the wit to win:
We drew a circle that took him in.
– Edwin Markham

DIRECTIONS: Write a well-organized composition on the topic below.

Often in literature, a major character faces a conflict between his or her moral principles and society’s conventions (rules of conduct or behavior). The character must choose between doing what he or she thinks is right or conforming to the demands of society.

By the end of the story, “Of Mice and Men,” the main characters’ dreams have been shattered and they have suffered great losses.

a. Explain what you believe each of the following characters has lost:
• Candy
• George
• Curley’s wife (before she loses her life)
• Crooks

b. In what ways are the losses of these people similar?

c. What were some of the main clues in the story that told us George and Lennie’s dream would probably not come true?

d. Why does George believe his dream is now destroyed? How do you feel when he says, “I guess I always knew we’d never do her?”

 

As you write your composition, remember to:

  • Give the title and the author of the work.
  • Focus on how each character suffered great losses.
  • Give any necessary plot information but avoid giving a plot summary.
  • Write in complete sentences.
  • Write coherent and well-developed paragraphs.
  • Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization.
Expository Literary Essay Plan

Expository Literary Essay Plan

Critical Response Rubric

Critical Response Rubric

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2015 ELA 20-1 Final Exam: Moral Conflict

He drew a circle that shut me out —
Heretic, rebel, a thing to flout.
But Love and I had the wit to win:
We drew a circle that took him in.
– Edwin Markham

DIRECTIONS: Write a well-organized composition on the topic below.

Often in literature, a major character faces a conflict between his or her moral principles and society’s conventions (rules of conduct or behavior). The character must choose between doing what he or she thinks is right or conforming to the demands of society.

Select a character from “Lord of the Flies,” by William Golding, who faces a conflict between personal morality and society’s conventions. Identify the character. Using specific references from the work, explain the nature of the character’s conflict, the struggle of this character to resolve the conflict, and the overall effect of this conflict on the work.

As you write your composition, remember to:

  • Give the title and the author of the work.
  • Focus on a character who faces a conflict between personal morality and society’s conventions.
  • Give specific examples, reasons, and details from the work to explain the nature of this conflict, the character’s struggle to resolve it, and its overall effect on the work.
  • Give any necessary plot information but avoid giving a plot summary.
  • Write in complete sentences.
  • Write coherent and well-developed paragraphs.
  • Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization.
Expository Literary Essay Plan

Expository Literary Essay Plan

Critical Response Rubric

Critical Response Rubric

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Macbeth: After Act 5 Personal Response

Examine one of the following topics and write a narrative or personal essay:

  • Kingship (Consider the four Kings in the play: Duncan, Macbeth, Edward, Malcolm)
  • Ambition (Consider the ambitions of Macbeth and Lady Macbeth)
  • Guilt (Consider Macbeth and Lady Macbeth’s response to guilt – and/or the Macduffs)
  • Order (Consider nature, politics, relationships, and how order is restored)
  • Deceptive Appearances
  • Fathers and Sons
  • Sleep
  • Loyalty and Patriotism
  • The Ideal Marriage

 

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Macbeth: After Act 3 Personal Response

Respond to one of the following prompts:

  • Sometimes we feel so angry or frustrated, so helpless or desperate that we lose all caution and restraint. Describe such an experience of your own or of someone you know.
  • If you had to choose between loyalty to your family and loyalty to your country, what decision would you make?
  • In your opinion, which qualities are essential in a political leader? Which qualities are unacceptable?
  • What kind of behaviour have you observed in children who are trying to conceal guilt? How do you conceal your guilty conscience?
  • Have you ever felt that everyone you know has turned against you? What were the circumstances? How did you deal with the situation?
  • Describe a situation in which you felt trapped. How did you behave?
  • Is revenge ever justified? Recall an incident in which you decided either to take revenge or that revenge would not be justified.
  • If your country had experienced great turmoil, how would you, as its leader, begin restoration?
Personal Response Rubric

Personal Response Rubric

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Macbeth: After Act 2 Personal Response

Respond to one of the following prompts:

  • Most of us have been afraid of the dark at one time or another. Think of a time when you or someone you know felt frightened in the dark. Describe the experience, explaining how the person dealt with the terror.
  • Think of an action you took and then immediately regretted taking. Why did you regret it? What did you do to make up for your mistake?
  • Have you ever received an emotional shock? How did you behave immediately afterwards? In what ways did your reaction to the shock change over time?
  • When do natural events seem unnatural? Write about a freakish natural event you have experienced or read about. How did it make you feel?
  • Sometimes the failure to speak or act when others expect us to reveal what we know is referred to as a “sin of omission.” Describe a situation in which you were tempted to commit the “sin of omission” or in which you actually did refrain from revealing what you knew. Would you do so again?
  • Sometimes, achieving a goal we have longed for does not make us feel as happy as we expected. Why do you think this is so? Share your ideas.
  • Have you ever known or read about someone who was distrustful of everybody and everything, regardless of the circumstances or evidence? Why was this person so suspicious? What effect did this attitude have on others?
  • Describe the most frightening experience you ever had. What was the cause of your fear?
  • Think of someone you know or have heard about who did something foolish because he or she was “over-confident.” Why is confidence an advantage and over-confidence a disadvantage?
  • Suppose you lived in an undemocratic country. How would you express your discontent with someone in authority?
Personal Response Rubric

Personal Response Rubric

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ELA 20 Short Story Unit

Short Story Unit

Part 1:

Read “An Ounce of Cure” and “The Quiet One”

http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/category/an-ounce-of-cure

http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/category/the-quiet-one

 

Formative:

Complete each of the following “Exploring the Text” responses.

(20-1 + 20-2) http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/2006/09/30/exploring-the-text

(20-1) http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/2014/09/07/exploring-the-text-10

 

Summative:

Post/print and hand in both of the following:

(20-1 + 20-2) Personal Response (pick one)

http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/2006/09/30/personal-response

(20-1) Critical Response (pick one)

http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/2014/09/03/an-ounce-of-cure-and-the-quiet-one-essay

 

Part 2

Read “The Tower,” “The Sea Devil,” and “The Hobby”

http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/category/the-tower

http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/category/the-sea-devil

http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/category/the-hobby

 

Formative:

Complete each of the following “Exploring the Text” responses.

http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/2006/09/30/exploring-the-text-6

http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/2006/09/30/exploring-the-text-5

http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/2006/09/30/exploring-the-text-8

 

Summative:

(20-2) Personal Response (pick one)

http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/2006/09/30/personal-response-5

http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/2014/09/24/personal-response-8

http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/2006/09/30/personal-response-6

 

(20-1) Critical Response (pick one)

http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/2006/09/30/the-hobby-and-the-sea-devil-essay-2

http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/2006/09/30/the-hobby-and-a-report-for-an-academy-essay

http://iblog.stjschool.org/moebius/2006/09/30/the-hobby-and-another-part-of-the-sky-essay

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ELA 20: Longing to Escape

from WILD GEESE

The story is set in the 1920s. Judith (Jude) Gare, who is 17 years old, has a passionate and rebellious spirit. Her overbearing father, Caleb, seeks to control Judith through the relentless demands of farm work. Caleb’s tyranny intimidates Judith’s mother, Amelia, as well as Judith’s submissive older sister, Ellen. Lind Archer, a young woman who has come to teach in the local school, boards with the Gares. Sven Sandbo is Judith’s sweetheart.

For the rest of the day, Judith’s hands were of no use to her, so she slipped away with her dog, Pete, through the bush to a little ravine where a pool had gathered below the thread of a spring. Pete caught a scent and was off, and Judith was left alone.

It was clingingly warm, as before rain. Not knowing fully what she was doing, Judith took off all her clothing and lay flat on the damp ground with the waxy feeling of new sunless vegetation under her. She needed to escape, to fly from something – she knew not what. Caleb . . . Ellen . . . the farm the hot reek of manure in the stable when it was close as today. Life was smothering, overwhelming her, like a pillow pressed against her face, like a feather tick[quilt] pinning down her body.

She would have struck Caleb today had it not been for Amelia. Always pity stood in the way of the tide of violence she felt could break from her. Pity for Amelia, who would get what Caleb did not dare mete out to her, Judith.

Oh, how knowing the bare earth was, as if it might have a heart and a mind hidden here in the woods. The fields that Caleb had tilled had no tenderness, she knew. But here was something forbiddingly beautiful, secret as one’s own body. And there was something beyond this. She could feel it in the freeness of the air, in the depth of the earth. Under the body there were, she had been taught, eight thousand miles of earth. On the other side, what? Above her body there were leagues and leagues of air, leading like wings – to what? The marvelous confusion and complexity of all the world had singled her out from the rest of the Gares. She was no longer one of them. Lind Archer had come and her delicate fingers had sprung a secret lock in Jude’s being. She had opened like a tight bud. There was no going back now into the darkness.

Sven Sandbo, he would be home in May, so they said. Was it Sven she wanted, now that she was so strangely free? Judith looked straight about her through the network of white birch and saw the bulbous white country that a cloud made against the blue. Something beyond Sven, perhaps . . . freedom, freedom. She dipped her blistered hands down into the clear topaz of the pool, lifted them and dipped them and lifted them, letting the drops slip off the tips of her fingers each time like tiny cups of light. She thought of the Teacher, of her dainty hands and her soft, laughing eyes . . . she came from another life, another world. She would go back there again. Her hands would never be maps of rope-blisters and Jude’s were now, from tugging a calf out of a mudhole. Jude hid her hands behind her and pressed herself against the cold ground. Hard, senseless sobs rose in her throat, and her eyes smarted with tears. She was ugly beyond all bearing, and all her life was ugly. Suddenly she was bursting with hatred of Caleb. Her large, strong body lay rigid on the ground, and was suddenly unnatural in that earthy place.

Martha Ostenso
1900-1963

ASSIGNMENT

Literature often describes some aspect of the human desire to escape. An individual may desire escape from physical, social, emotional, or psychological circumstances. Whether the individual responds actively or passively to that desire affects the course of his or her life.

In this excerpt from the novel Wild Geese, Martha Ostenso uses descriptive details to convey to the reader a sense of Jude’s longing to escape.

What idea(s) does Martha Ostenso develop regarding the desire to escape? Develop your essay by providing specific supporting details from Wild Geese.

•FOCUS your essay on your controlling idea regarding escape. Provide only those details that develop and support your controlling idea.

•ORGANIZE your essay so that your ideas are clearly and coherently developed.

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