Category Archives: LA 9

How an 11-Year-Old Boy Invented the Popsicle

This week in class, we’re reading “How an 11-Year-Old Boy Invented the Popsicle” by Shelby Pope for NPR.

In this article, the young innovator responsible for inventing the popsicle at 11 years old is discussed.

As we read, we will be discussing the themes of Growing Up and Resilience & Success as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“Why should we value our youth?” and “Why do people succeed?”

Ways to support your child:

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Examination Day

This week in class, we’re reading “Examination Day” by Henry Slesar.

In Henry Slesar’s short story “Examination Day,” a boy takes an intelligence exam administered by the government.

As we read, we will be discussing the theme of Fear & Paranoia as it relates to the text. We are trying to answer this big question :

“How does fear drive action?”

Ways to support your child:

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The Veldt

This week in class, we’re reading “The Veldt” by Ray Bradbury.

In Ray Bradbury’s short story “The Veldt,” Mr. and Mrs. Hadley become concerned when they realize how dependent their children are on the technology in their futuristic home.

As we read, we will be discussing the themes of Friendship & Family and Technology, Progress & Industry as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“What are the costs and benefits of technology?” and “What makes a family?”

Ways to support your child:

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All Summer in a Day

This week in class, we’re reading “All Summer in a Day” by Ray Bradbury.

In this classic Ray Bradbury short story, the children on planet Venus wait to see the sun for the first time in seven years.

As we read, we will be discussing the themes of Fear & Paranoia, Honor & Courage, and Loneliness & Isolation as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“How does fear drive action?”, “What does it mean to be brave?”, and “What does it mean to feel alone?”

“Is it sometimes better to hide parts of ourselves so we can fit in?” “If someone doesn’t fit in, is it their fault?”

Ways to support your child:

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Parent Guide: There Will Come Soft Rains

This week in class, we’re reading “There Will Come Soft Rains” by Sara Teasdale.

In “There Will Come Soft Rains,” nature is indifferent to the conflicts and suffering of mankind.

As we read, we will be discussing the themes of Man vs. Nature and War & Peace as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“Who’s in control: man or nature?” and “How are we changed by war?”

Ways to support your child:

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The Road Not Taken

This week in class, we’re reading “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost.

Published in 1916, this poem is one of the most frequently cited and most misunderstood of Frost’s poems.

As we read, we will be discussing the themes of Fate & Free Will and Identity as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“What makes you who you are?” and “Can we control our fate?”

Ways to support your child:

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Invictus

his week in class, we’re reading “Invictus” by William Ernest Henley.

William Ernest Henley (1849-1903) was an English poet, critic, and editor. His best-known poem is “Invictus,” published in 1875, which he wrote just following the amputation of his foot due to tuberculosis.

As we read, we will be discussing the themes of Fate & Free WillIdentity, and Resilience & Success as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“How does a person overcome adversity?”, “What makes you who you are?”, and “Can we control our fate?”

Ways to support your child:

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Nothing Gold Can Stay

This week in class, we’re reading “Nothing Gold Can Stay” by Robert Frost.

Robert Frost (1874-1963) was one of the most popular and critically respected American poets in history. His poems frequently employ rural scenes from the New England countryside. “Nothing Gold Can Stay,” published in 1923, uses nature to describe aging and the inevitable course of time.

As we read, we will be discussing the themes of Growing Up and Man vs. Nature as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“Why should we value our youth?” and “How do we view nature?”

Ways to support your child:

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Parent Guide: Travel

This week in class, we’re reading “Travel” by Robert Louis Stevenson.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) was a Scottish novelist, poet, essayist, and travel writer. In this poem, the narrator speaks of his wish to travel the world, one day, when he is “a man.”

As we read, we will be discussing the theme of Growing Up as it relates to the text. We are trying to answer this big question :

“What does it mean to be grown up?”

Ways to support your child:

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If

This week in class, we’re reading “If” by Rudyard Kipling.

In “If,” the speaker sets out a list of rules by which he thinks his son should live.

As we read, we will be discussing the themes of Friendship & Family, Growing Up, and Honor & Courage as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“What does it mean to be grown up?”, “What does it mean to be brave?”, and “What makes a family?”

Ways to support your child:

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