Tag Archives: artistry

Language Arts 9 Course Outline

Instructor: Mr D. Sader, St. Jerome’s Catholic School

1. Course Philosophy
The aim of the English Language Arts is to encourage an understanding and appreciation of the importance and artistry of literature in students. It will enable students to use language confidently and competently for a variety of purposes, with a variety of audiences and in a variety of situations for communication, personal satisfaction and learning.

In St. Jerome’s Catholic School, the students are invited to look further and develop a more coherent understanding of what language means as both a Christian event and a human event. Facility with language provides us with the ability to express ourselves and our faith in words, and to communicate, listen, and enter into dialogue and true relationships with others. Higher-level thinking skills of inquiring, reasoning and reporting are recognized as particular gifts from God, bringing with them special responsibilities to use such talents for the good of the community. Students are invited to consider how the knowledge, skills and values studied within the language arts curriculum are integrated with other subject areas, including religious education and reflect the Catholic identity of the school.

2. General Outcomes/Themes:
English Language Arts General Outcomes 9 (2000)

Through listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and representing the students will:

  1. explore thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences.
  2. comprehend and respond personally and critically to oral, print and other media texts
  3. manage ideas and information
  4. enhance the clarity and artistry of communication
  5. respect, support and collaborate with others.

Theme (Focus):
The Human Condition–In Search of Self

3. Assessment
Assessment in all classes will occur on a regular basis. Assessment strategies fit into two broad categories: Assessment FOR Learning(during), and Assessment OF learning(after).

Assessment FOR Learning occurs during instruction and looks like discussion, peer review, student meetings, sharing questions and answers, revision, rewriting, personal reflection. Example assessments during learning: “Start an Online Discussion,” “Hamlet IV,iv Discussion,” “Honour and Certainty,” “Pillars of Character,” “Group Novel Study,” “Story Study Guide.”

Assessment OF Learning occurs midway through or at the end or a unit of instruction and looks like high stakes tests, midterm and final exams, end of unit tests, portfolios. Example assessments after learning: “Applying for a Summer Job,” “Choices Essay,” “Portfolio 10,” “Hamlet: Final Response,” “ELA 30 Final Exam.”

Marks taken during assessments and evaluations will contribute toward the final grade. Each unit of study uses various types of evaluation such as exams, assignments, collaborations, presentations. The weighting of each mark contributes to the unit total while the weighting of each unit contributes to the overall course grade. Late assignments will not be accepted after the end of unit due dates. Refer to student handbook for appeals procedures.

Approximate Gradebook Category Weighting
Personal/Creative ~ 30%

  • short stories, scripts, narratives, poems, book reviews, book talk, forum posts, online class discussion, blog comments, reading logs, any other personal/creative response to a text

Critical/Analytical ~ 40%

  • essays, letters, speeches, debates, reports, character sketches, any other critical or analytical response to a text

Representing ~ 5%

  • posters, photo essay, images, videos, animations, tag clouds, podcasts, surveys, mobiles, dioramas, collages, and any other assorted “blog bling”

Final Exam ~ 25%

  • Provincial Achievement Test: multiple choice reading comprehension (55 marks of 110), business letter functional writing assignment(20/110), and an expository/essay or narrative writing assignment(35/110).

4. Course Work and Evaluation
Quarter 1 Marks collected from course beginning to 1st report card cut-off
Quarter 2 Marks collected from course beginning to semester break cut-off.
Quarter 3 Marks collected from course beginning to 3rd report card cut-off.
Quarter 4 Marks collected from course beginning to final exam.

Provincial Achievement Test ~ 25%(Part A: May TBA; Part B: June TBA)

5. Primary Resources
Crossroads 9, Gage/Nelson Educational Publishing
Novel, TBA

Students will receive only one copy of each text according to the rental agreement. Additional/replacement texts may be purchased through the school office.

Reading List

Students are encouraged, but not required, to bring their own electronic internet devices into the classroom. These devices include and are not limited to laptops (any OS), Chromebooks, smartphones, tablets, ebook readers etc, etc, etc. Basically, if the device can browse the school’s website via the school’s enterprise class wi-fi network, it would be useful in the classroom (most days). Student use of any device must comply with the School Acceptable Use Policy.

Completion of English Language Arts 9 requires the writing of 2 provincial achievement tests in May and June.

Alberta Education Resources for Parents

“My Child’s Learning”: Learn More About English Language Arts

English Language Arts 20 Course Outline

Instructor: Mr. D. Sader, St. Jerome’s Catholic School

1. Course Philosophy
The Alberta English Language Arts Program emphasizes lifelong applications of Language Arts skills. Language use reflects the inter-relatedness of the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and representing. Language is used to communicate understandings, ideas and feelings, to assist social and personal development, and to mediate thought processes. Language expansion occurs primarily through active involvement in language situations. Through writing the student can learn to clarify thought, emotion, and experience, and to share ideas, emotion and experiences with others. Literature is an integrated part of language learning.

In St. Jerome’s Catholic School, the students are invited to look further and develop a more coherent understanding of what language means as both a Christian event and a human event. Facility with language provides us with the ability to express ourselves and our faith in words, and to communicate, listen, and enter into dialogue and true relationships with others. Higher-level thinking skills of inquiring, reasoning and reporting are recognized as particular gifts from God, bringing with them special responsibilities to use such talents for the good of the community.

2. General Outcomes/Themes:
The study of English language arts enables each student to understand and appreciate the significance and artistry of literature. As well, it enables each student to understand and appreciate language and to use it confidently and competently for a variety of purposes, with a variety of audiences and in a variety of situations for communication, personal satisfaction, and learning.

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to

  • explore thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences.
  • comprehend literature and other texts in oral, print, visual and multimedia forms, and respond personally, critically and creatively.
  • manage ideas and information.
  • create oral, print, visual and multimedia texts, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication.
  • respect, support and collaborate with others.

The learning outcomes are interrelated and interdependent; each is to be achieved through a variety of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and representing experiences. Senior high school students engage all six language arts as they study texts and as they create their own texts in relevant situations for a variety of purposes and audiences. The classroom community, available resources, peer assistance, cooperation, individual motivation and teacher leadership will all assist growth. The application of computer technology in the writing process is essential for success.

Themes:
Decisions–Action or Apathy
The Human Condition–In Search of Self
World Perspectives–The Social Experience
Equality–Pain and Pride
Environment and Technology–Reality and Responsibility

Literature Texts:

  • Novel
  • Book-length Nonfiction or Feature Film
  • Modern Play
  • Shakespearean Play
  • Poetry (including song)
  • Short Story
  • Visual and Multimedia Text (including short films, video clips, photographs)
  • Essay
  • Popular Nonfiction (including news stories, feature articles, reviews, and other forms of informative and persuasive text)

Personal and Analytical/Critical Response Forms:

  • Narrative (factual and fictional)
  • Informative and Persuasive (essay, commentary, article, and review)
  • Poetry
  • Script
  • Oral, Visual, Multimedia (presentation, short film, photo essay, reader’s theatre, demonstration, prepared speech)

3. Assessment
Assessment in all classes will occur on a regular basis. Assessment strategies fit into two broad categories: Assessment FOR Learning(during), and Assessment OF learning(after).

Assessment FOR Learning occurs during instruction and looks like discussion, peer review, student meetings, sharing questions and answers, revision, rewriting, personal reflection. Example assessments during learning: “Start an Online Discussion,” “Hamlet IV,iv Discussion,” “Honour and Certainty,” “Pillars of Character,” “Group Novel Study,” “Story Study Guide.”

Assessment OF Learning occurs midway through or at the end or a unit of instruction and looks like high stakes tests, midterm and final exams, end of unit tests, portfolios. Example assessments after learning: “Applying for a Summer Job,” “Choices Essay,” “Portfolio 10,” “Hamlet: Final Response,” “ELA 30 Final Exam.”

Marks taken during assessments and evaluations will contribute toward the final grade. Each unit of study uses various types of evaluation such as exams, assignments, collaborations, presentations. The total point scored of each mark contributes to the overall course grade. Late assignments will not be accepted after the end of unit due dates.

Total Point Weighting
Personal/Creative

  • short stories, scripts, narratives, poems, book reviews, book talk, forum posts, online class discussion, blog comments, reading logs, any other personal/creative response to a text

Critical/Analytical

  • essays, letters, speeches, debates, reports, character sketches, any other critical or analytical response to a text

Representing

  • posters, photo essay, images, videos, animations, tag clouds, podcasts, surveys, mobiles, dioramas, collages, and any other assorted “blog bling”

Final Exam 25%

4. Final Evaluation

  • Report Card 1: Marks collected from course beginning to 1st report card cut-off
  • Final Report Card: Marks collected from course beginning to final exam.
  • School Final Exam 25% (Date TBA)

5. Primary Resources
Students will receive only one copy of each text according to the rental agreement. Additional/replacement texts may be purchased through the school office.
Reading List.
TBA: many free online sources, sites, etexts will be used.

Students are encouraged, but not required, to bring their own electronic internet devices into the classroom. These devices include and are not limited to laptops (any OS), Chromebooks, smartphones, tablets, ebook readers etc, etc, etc. Basically, if the device can browse the school’s website via the school’s enterprise class wi-fi network, it would be useful in the classroom (most days). Student use of any device must comply with the School Acceptable Use Policy.

6. ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 versus ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2
The ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 course sequence provides an opportunity to study texts with an increased emphasis on critical analysis. Texts studied are often “literary” in nature and relate to cultural and societal issues. These courses are designed for students who aspire to careers that require a broader application of skill to a generalized level.

The ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2 course sequence provides for the study of texts at a variety of levels of sophistication to meet the needs of students who are more diverse in terms of aspirations and abilities. Texts studied often have specific applications to careers or daily living. The courses focus on developing effective communication strategies and supporting students in enhancing their skills for text study and text creation.

Both ELA 30-1 and 30-2 serve as prerequisites for a senior high school diploma; however, not all post-secondary institutions accept ELA 30-2 for entry. In general, students who plan to attend a post-secondary institution need to familiarize themselves with the entry requirements of the institution and the program they plan to enter.

Completion of English Language Arts 30-1 or 30-2 requires the writing of a provincial diploma examination.

2011-2012 Senior High Curriculum Handbook for Parents: Catholic Version

ALberta Education: Learn More About The 20-Level English Language Arts Courses

English Language Arts 10 Course Outline

1. Course Philosophy
The Alberta English Language Arts Program emphasizes lifelong applications of Language Arts skills. Language use reflects the inter-relatedness of the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and representing. Language is used to communicate understandings, ideas and feelings, to assist social and personal development, and to mediate thought processes. Language expansion occurs primarily through active involvement in language situations. Through writing the student can learn to clarify thought, emotion, and experience, and to share ideas, emotion and experiences with others. Literature is an integrated part of language learning.

In St. Jerome’s Catholic School, the students are invited to look further and develop a more coherent understanding of what language means as both a Christian event and a human event. Facility with language provides us with the ability to express ourselves and our faith in words, and to communicate, listen, and enter into dialogue and true relationships with others. Higher-level thinking skills of inquiring, reasoning and reporting are recognized as particular gifts from God, bringing with them special responsibilities to use such talents for the good of the community.

2. General Outcomes/Themes:
The study of English language arts enables each student to understand and appreciate the significance and artistry of literature. As well, it enables each student to understand and appreciate language and to use it confidently and competently for a variety of purposes, with a variety of audiences and in a variety of situations for communication, personal satisfaction, and learning.

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to

  • explore thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences.
  • comprehend literature and other texts in oral, print, visual and multimedia forms, and respond personally, critically and creatively.
  • manage ideas and information.
  • create oral, print, visual and multimedia texts, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication.
  • respect, support and collaborate with others.

The learning outcomes are interrelated and interdependent; each is to be achieved through a variety of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and representing experiences. Senior high school students engage all six language arts as they study texts and as they create their own texts in relevant situations for a variety of purposes and audiences. The classroom community, available resources, peer assistance, cooperation, individual motivation and teacher leadership will all assist growth. The application of computer technology in the writing process is essential for success.

Themes:
Decisions–Action or Apathy
The Human Condition–In Search of Self
World Perspectives–The Social Experience
Equality–Pain and Pride
Environment and Technology–Reality and Responsibility

3. Assessment
Assessment in all classes will occur on a regular basis. Assessment strategies fit into two broad categories: Assessment FOR Learning(during), and Assessment OF learning(after).

Assessment FOR Learning occurs during instruction and looks like discussion, peer review, student meetings, sharing questions and answers, revision, rewriting, personal reflection. Example assessments during learning: “Start an Online Discussion,” “Hamlet IV,iv Discussion,” “Honour and Certainty,” “Pillars of Character,” “Group Novel Study,” “Story Study Guide.”

Assessment OF Learning occurs midway through or at the end or a unit of instruction and looks like high stakes tests, midterm and final exams, end of unit tests, portfolios. Example assessments after learning: “Applying for a Summer Job,” “Choices Essay,” “Portfolio 10,” “Hamlet: Final Response,” “ELA 30 Final Exam.”

Marks taken during assessments and evaluations will contribute toward the final grade. Each unit of study uses various types of evaluation such as exams, assignments, collaborations, presentations. The weighting of each mark contributes to the unit total while the weighting of each unit contributes to the overall course grade. Late assignments will not be accepted after the end of unit due dates. Refer to student handbook for appeals procedures.

Approximate Gradebook Category Weighting
Personal/Creative ~ 30%

  • short stories, scripts, narratives, poems, book reviews, book talk, forum posts, online class discussion, blog comments, reading logs, any other personal/creative response to a text

Critical/Analytical ~ 40%

  • essays, letters, speeches, debates, reports, character sketches, any other critical or analytical response to a text

Representing ~ 5%

  • posters, photo essay, images, videos, animations, tag clouds, podcasts, surveys, mobiles, dioramas, collages, and any other assorted “blog bling”

Final Exam ~ 25%

4. Course Work and Evaluation

Unit 1 ~ 37.5% Determined from marks collected from course beginning to 1st report card cut-off

Unit 2 ~ 37.5% Determined from marks collected from 1st report card cut-off to final exam.

School Final Exam ~ 25% (Date TBA)

5. Primary Resources
Students will receive only one copy of each text according to the rental agreement. Additional/replacement texts may be purchased through the school office.
Reading List

6. ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 versus ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2
The ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 course sequence provides an opportunity to study texts with an increased emphasis on critical analysis. Texts studied are often “literary” in nature and relate to cultural and societal issues. These courses are designed for students who aspire to careers that require a broader application of skill to a generalized level.

The ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2 course sequence provides for the study of texts at a variety of levels of sophistication to meet the needs of students who are more diverse in terms of aspirations and abilities. Texts studied often have specific applications to careers or daily living. The courses focus on developing effective communication strategies and supporting students in enhancing their skills for text study and text creation.

Both ELA 30-1 and 30-2 serve as prerequisites for a senior high school diploma; however, not all post-secondary institutions accept ELA 30-2 for entry. In general, students who plan to attend a post-secondary institution need to familiarize themselves with the entry requirements of the institution and the program they plan to enter.

Completion of English Language Arts 30-1 or 30-2 requires the writing of a provincial diploma examination.

Senior High Curriculum at a Glance (pdf)

Portfolio 10: Now Focus on Me

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view, and represent to:

  1. Explore thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences
  2. Comprehend literature and other texts in oral, print, visual, and multimedia forms, and respond personally, critically, and creatively.
  3. Manage ideas and information
    • determine inquiry or research requirements
    • follow a plan of inquiry
  4. Create oral, print, visual, and multimedia texts, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication
  5. Respect, support, and collaborate with others

Specific Outcomes:

  1. Each student will write a final post as an introduction to all the portfolio pieces that directly or indirectly let the audience know what it is s/he values most about life.
  2. Students will internalize focus questions.
  3. Students will infuse ICT outcomes.
  4. Students will create a portfolio in response to course focus questions.
  5. Students will improve their “TIC” (Technique, Insight, Communication)
  6. Student writing skills will emphasize an increase in personal voice and a decrease in X=X errors

    Students will plan a portfolio that includes the following.

    1. One post about a novel’s exploration of a focus question
    2. One post about a short story’s exploration of a focus question
    3. One post about an excerpt from Shakespeare exploring a focus question
    4. One post prompted by viewing a film or TV episode with emphasis on voice and critical thinking about a focus question
    5. One post prompted by a music lyric with emphasis on voice and critical thinking about a focus question
    6. Now Focus on Me: a final post as an introduction to all the portfolio pieces that directly or indirectly let the audience know what it is s/he values most about life.

      Assessment/Evaluation:

      • 1 submission but all assignments must be included/linked

      Timeline:

      • May 30: final submission

      Rubric:

      • rubric.png

      Prepare for English Language Arts Finals

      For those in the midst, or looking ahead at finals in my LA classes(9, 10-1, 20-1, 20-2, 30-1, 30-2).

      Consider the outcomes we’ve tried to achieve.

      Enhancing the artistry of communication has been a strong technical focus. Skills mastered include using online blogging tools, Word Processing, Spreadsheets, even graphical enhancements using Photoshop or audio/video podcasting tools have been included where time permitted and initiative taken. Participation on an online forum has generated a myriad of useful tips/reminders, questions/answers. There will be no speadsheets on the final, the use of Word will be necessary for English 30.

      Each course has been structured around Focus Questions and related questions: English 10, English 9.

      Emphasis on social networking, peer review/support/criticism has been critical for developing critical thought and reflection for writers defending an idea.

      Each course has a reading list: English 10, English 30. Not every title has been studied intensively(or at all), but the proportion of attention paid to those pieces that were studied in class deserve the same level of attention on the final. Of course, those who choose additional literature from the list to focus on in the final deserve to have that initiative rewarded as well. If you choose to focus on Shakespeare, your audience gets tougher, I’ve noticed.

      An English 30 paper looking at how the images/symbols/archetypes of Sophocles and Kingsolver relate to personal freedom to would be intriguing. Why not an English 10 paper discussing the threat of fanaticism by comparing the speeches of Mark Antony, Joseph Strorm, and Eamon De valera? What does Søren Kierkegaard have to do with every page you’ve ever read or written?

      Extras, everyone should be able to link to Wikipedia for literary terms, difficult vocabulary, or just the odd or eccentric idea; can anyone incorporate the Hayflick Limit into their paper? Everyone has seen video and heard an mp3, but are any daring enough to Podcast their final essay? A carefully edited U2 mp3 snip, an embedded flash video of Ophelia Simpson, a slideshow?

      rubric.pngThe only limit is to abide the first line of every rubric you’ve ever attached to any assignment:

      I _________________ honestly declare that the work is what I have done. In circumstances when I have quoted a certain authority, I have clearly indicated what is a quote and the author. 

      A Blogger’s Code of Ethics contains truths far older than the phenomenon of blogging.

      English 30s will have no access to internet, filesharing, etc etc. English 10s can have it all.

      English Language Arts 30 Course Outline

      1. Course Philosophy
      The Alberta English Language Arts Program emphasizes lifelong applications of Language Arts skills. Language use reflects the inter-relatedness of the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and representing. Language is used to communicate understandings, ideas and feelings, to assist social and personal development, and to mediate thought processes. Language expansion occurs primarily through active involvement in language situations. Through writing the student can learn to clarify thought, emotion, and experience, and to share ideas, emotion and experiences with others. Literature is an integrated part of language learning.

      In St. Jerome’s Catholic School, the students are invited to look further and develop a more coherent understanding of what language means as both a Christian event and a human event. Facility with language provides us with the ability to express ourselves and our faith in words, and to communicate, listen, and enter into dialogue and true relationships with others. Higher-level thinking skills of inquiring, reasoning and reporting are recognized as particular gifts from God, bringing with them special responsibilities to use such talents for the good of the community.

      2. General Outcomes/Themes:
      The study of English language arts enables each student to understand and appreciate the significance and artistry of literature. As well, it enables each student to understand and appreciate language and to use it confidently and competently for a variety of purposes, with a variety of audiences and in a variety of situations for communication, personal satisfaction, and learning.

      Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to

      • explore thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences.
      • comprehend literature and other texts in oral, print, visual and multimedia forms, and respond personally, critically and creatively.
      • manage ideas and information.
      • create oral, print, visual and multimedia texts, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication.
      • respect, support and collaborate with others.

      The learning outcomes are interrelated and interdependent; each is to be achieved through a variety of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and representing experiences. Senior high school students engage all six language arts as they study texts and as they create their own texts in relevant situations for a variety of purposes and audiences. The classroom community, available resources, peer assistance, cooperation, individual motivation and teacher leadership will all assist growth. The application of computer technology in the writing process is essential for success.

      Themes:
      Decisions–Action or Apathy
      The Human Condition–In Search of Self
      World Perspectives–The Social Experience
      Equality–Pain and Pride
      Environment and Technology–Reality and Responsibility

      3. Assessment
      Assessment in all classes will occur on a regular basis. Assessment strategies fit into two broad categories: Assessment FOR Learning(during), and Assessment OF learning(after).

      Assessment FOR Learning occurs during instruction and looks like discussion, peer review, student meetings, sharing questions and answers, revision, rewriting, personal reflection. Example assessments during learning: “Start an Online Discussion,” “Hamlet IV,iv Discussion,” “Honour and Certainty,” “Pillars of Character,” “Group Novel Study,” “Story Study Guide.”

      Assessment OF Learning occurs midway through or at the end or a unit of instruction and looks like high stakes tests, midterm and final exams, end of unit tests, portfolios. Example assessments after learning: “Applying for a Summer Job,” “Choices Essay,” “Portfolio 10,” “Hamlet: Final Response,” “ELA 30 Final Exam.”

      Marks taken during assessments and evaluations will contribute toward the final grade. Each unit or text of study uses various types of evaluation such as exams, assignments, collaborations, presentations. The total number of points of each mark contributes to the course total while the weighting of the final exam contributes to the overall course grade. Late assignments will not be accepted after the report card cut-off dates.

      Course Work Total Point Weighting
      Personal/Creative

      • short stories, scripts, narratives, poems, book reviews, book talk, forum posts, online class discussion, blog comments, reading logs, any other personal/creative response to a text

      Critical/Analytical

      • essays, letters, speeches, debates, reports, character sketches, any other critical or analytical response to a text

      Representing

      • posters, photo essay, images, videos, animations, tag clouds, podcasts, surveys, mobiles, dioramas, collages, and any other assorted “blog bling”

      Final Exam 25% or course total points.

      4. Course Work and Diploma Evaluation
      Course Work: 38.5%
      School Final Exam 12.5% (Date TBA)
      Diploma Exam 50% (Date TBA )

      5. Primary Resources
      Reading List

      6. ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 versus ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2
      The ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 course sequence provides an opportunity to study texts with an increased emphasis on critical analysis. Texts studied are often “literary” in nature and relate to cultural and societal issues. These courses are designed for students who aspire to careers that require a broader application of skill to a generalized level.

      The ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2 course sequence provides for the study of texts at a variety of levels of sophistication to meet the needs of students who are more diverse in terms of aspirations and abilities. Texts studied often have specific applications to careers or daily living. The courses focus on developing effective communication strategies and supporting students in enhancing their skills for text study and text creation.

      Both ELA 30-1 and 30-2 serve as prerequisites for a senior high school diploma; however, not all post-secondary institutions accept ELA 30-2 for entry. In general, students who plan to attend a post-secondary institution need to familiarize themselves with the entry requirements of the institution and the program they plan to enter.

      Completion of English Language Arts 30-1 or 30-2 requires the writing of a provincial diploma examination.

      Diploma Exemplars
      Diploma Guides
      Diploma Practice @ Quest A+
      Diploma Tips
      Visuals
      Senior High Curriculum at a Glance (pdf)

      English Language Arts General Outcomes 10, 20, 30(2003)

      Students will listen, speak, read, write, view, and represent to:
      1. Explore thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences

      • discover possibilities
        • form tentative understandings, interpretations, and positions
        • experiment with language, image, and structure
      • extend awareness
        • consider new perspectives
        • express preferences, and expand interests
        • set personal goals for language growth

      2. Comprehend literature and other texts in oral, print, visual, and multimedia forms, and respond personally, critically, and creatively.

      • respond to a variety of print and nonprint texts
        • connect self, text, culture, milieu
        • evaluate the verisimilitude, appropriateness, and significance of print and nonprint texts
        • appreciate the effectiveness and artistry of print and nonprint texts
      • construct meaning form text and context
        • discern and analyze context
        • understand and interpret content
        • engage prior knowledge
        • use reference strategies and reference technologies
      • understand and appreciate textual forms, elements, and techniques
        • relate form, structure, and medium to purpose, audience, and content
        • relate elements, devices, and techniques to created effects

      3. Manage ideas and information

      • determine inquiry or research requirements
        • focus on purpose and presentation form
        • plan inquiry or research, and identify information needs and sources
      • follow a plan of inquiry
        • select, record, and organize information
        • evaluate sources, and assess information
        • form generalizations and conclusions
        • review inquiry or research process and findings

      4. Create oral, print, visual, and multimedia texts, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication

      • develop and present a variety of print and nonprint texts
        • assess text creation content
        • consider and address form, structure, and medium
        • develop content
        • use production, publication, and presentation strategies and technologies consistent with context
      • improve thoughtfulness, effectiveness, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication
        • enhance thought and understanding and support and detail
        • enhance organization
        • consider and address matters of choice
        • edit text for matters of correctness

      5. Respect, support, and collaborate with others

      • respect others and strengthen community
        • use language and image to show respect and consideration
        • appreciate diversity of expression, opinion, and perspective
        • recognize accomplishments and events
      • work within a group
        • cooperate with others and contribute to group processes
        • understand and evaluate group processes

      text_study.pngtext_creation1.png
      View English Language Arts Curriculum PDF(ELA10-1, ELA10-2, ELA20-1, ELA20-2, ELA30-1, ELA30-2)