Tag Archives: conscience

Religion 15: Belonging

1. Course Philosophy
The Senior High Religious Studies Program engages students in the Search for Meaning. The approach does not limit or deny any stage of adolescent psychological or spiritual growth. Instead, it offers to adolescents a way of realizing and fulfilling their possibilities as human beings.

The course on Belonging is intended to help students understand what it means to be “fully alive.” It does so by recognizing that one of the primary needs of adolescents is to experience a sense of belonging. In seeking to belong, they question and challenge those values which will eventually become convictions worth sharing with others. In their quest to find meaning in belonging, there is the constant interaction between what the gospel teaches and the human experience.

2. General Outcomes/Themes
The student will:

  • Explore an overview of world religions(Judaism, Christianity, Islam)
  • Examine the principles that guide Catholics in understanding their role in shaping culture
  • Understand that belonging to the Christian community involves witness and service.
  • Understand how the work of Jesus continues in the world through the Catholic Church.
  • Explore relationships with self, others and God from a Catholic perspective.

3. Assessment
A person’s relationship with God is a matter of conscience, the internal forum of the soul. God alone is the arbiter of souls (and then again, who can plumb the depths of Divine Mercy?). It is important, therefore, that we avoid the grading or evaluation of a student’s faith.

We grade the knowledge the student has acquired based on the program of studies and the skills the student is able to show in articulating his/her knowledge.

A wide range of assessment information is used in the development of a student’s final grade. Individualized assessments provide specific information regarding student progress and overall performance in class. Student assessment may vary from student to student to adapt to differences in student needs, learning styles, preferences, and paces. Not all assignments are used for assessment.

Course Work and Evaluation

  1. Christian Action Assignment: 15% (suggested minimum hours of service = 10 – typically these would not be instructional hours)
  2. Comparative World Religions: 20%
  3. Course work: 65% (may include assignments, presentations, journals, reviews, notes, research projects, portfolios, exams and quizzes)

4. Primary Resources
Christ and Culture, Concacan, Ottawa, Ontario, 2001

Exploring the Religions of our World, Nancy Clemmons, Ave Maria Press, Notre Dame, Indiana. 1999.

Religion 25: Believing

1. Course Philosophy
The program addresses real life issues. What do I believe about myself, others, God? How am I to live my life? In the search to find answers to such questions, adolescents will make decisions.

The beliefs adolescents hold will greatly influence the choices they make. For the most part, their beliefs are not solidified. They still have many discoveries to make before they settle for life-long commitments. But for now, they search.

2. General Outcomes/Themes
The student will:

  • Explore how believing is integral to human living.
  • Investigate the role of truth, goodness, the spiritual and religious community in the search to believe.
  • Explore believing in the Great Religions of the East, Hinduism and Buddhism.
  • Study the Bible as a source of Christian belief.
  • Understand the message of Jesus.
  • Identify ways in which Christians cooperate in bringing about the Reign of God.

Theme:
Believing is Integral to Human Living

3. Assessment
A person’s relationship with God is a matter of conscience, the internal forum of the soul. God alone is the arbiter of souls (and then again, who can plumb the depths of Divine Mercy?). It is important, therefore, that we avoid the grading or evaluation of a student’s faith.

We grade the knowledge the student has acquired based on the program of studies and the skills the student is able to show in articulating his/her knowledge.

A wide range of assessment information is used in the development of a student’s final grade. Individualized assessments provide specific information regarding student progress and overall performance in class. Student assessment may vary from student to student to adapt to differences in student needs, learning styles, preferences, and paces. Not all assignments are used for assessment.

4. Course Work and Evaluation
5 Credits:

  1. Christian Action Assignment ~ 15% (suggested minimum hours of service = 10 – typically these would not be instructional hours)
  2. Course work: ~ 55% (may include assignments, presentations, journals, reviews, notes, research projects, portfolios, exams and quizzes)
  3. Final Exam: ~ 25%

3 Credits:

  1. Course work: ~ 75% (may include assignments, presentations, journals, reviews, notes, research projects, portfolios, exams and quizzes)
  2. Final Exam: ~ 25%

5. Primary Resources
Hengel, Dr. John van den, et al. World Religions: A Canadian Catholic Perspective. Nelson, 1970.
O’Malley, William J. Building Your Own Conscience (Batteries Not Included). Tabor Pub., 1992.
Linn, Dennis, et al. Good Goats: Healing Our Image of God. Paulist Press, 1993.
Young, William P. The Shack: Where Tragedy Confronts Eternity. Windblown Media, 1970,

Reading List

Decisions–Action or Apathy

We must constantly make decisions in daily life. Some decisions are simple choices (e.g., Coke or Pepsi) while others affect people’s entire lives. Furthermore, every decision has consequences and often there is not a clear alternative. Decisions involve weighing alternatives and considering the consequences. This unit presents opportunities for students to examine values, beliefs, and pressures that surround decision making.

When you have to make a choice and don’t make it, that is in itself a choice. -William James

Life Pressures
What are the important decisions that we will have to make in our life time?
Related Questions:

  • What are the commonplace decisions we have to make every day? What role do peers, parents, and teachers play in our decisions? What role does experience play in our decisions? How do you make up your mind?
  • What are the common pressures we face in today’s society? What are the greatest pressures for us?
  • What are the best ways to learn the important lessons of life?
  • What things worry or annoy us? How do people respond to stress in life?
  • How can we control our fate? How can we “seize the moment” when opportunities present themselves?

Values
How do we uphold our values?
Related Questions:

  • What role do our values play in decision making? What other factors influence our decisions?
  • What do we value most? How do our actions reflect this?
  • How do our values differ from others? How do we determine our values?
  • What makes us listen or not listen to our conscience?
  • What considerations must we take into account if our decisions directly affect the lives of other human beings? What actions can a group take in order to prevent an individual from doing what he/she believes is right?
  • What is worth fighting for? What compromises are we willing to make?

Consequences
How do we live with the consequences of our decision making?
Related Questions:

  • What are the consequences of an important decision that you have made recently?
  • What are informed decisions? What are uninformed decisions?
  • What role does foresight play in our decision making? What are the advantages and disadvantages of hindsight?
  • What is the effect of making a decision when we are uncertain of the consequences? What are the consequences of making decisions which go against what other people think? What price do we pay for each decision we make?
  • What role does emotion and feeling play in our decision making?

Career Decisions
What are the important career decisions we must make in a life time?
Related Questions:

  • How do we attain our personal and career goals? What alternative choices do we have?
  • What specific personal, academic, and socio-economic choices will we be willing to make in order to achieve our career goals?
  • What is the most important choice you have had to make in your life thus far?
  • Who controls our future? What do we do if our plans work out differently than what we had intended?

Apathy versus Action
How and why must we act upon our knowledge, values, and abilities for the well-being of others?
Related Questions:

  • How can we justify a position or action?
  • What moves us to action? What forces encourage apathy?
  • How can we act to make our views and decisions felt?
  • How can society be improved?
  • Does conforming to the beliefs and actions of the majority make a person a “good citizen”?

 

II. ENGLISH 10: What makes us listen to our conscience?

ENGLISH 10 Comments only SVP.

Scour your notes, “google” your minds, attach a comment with an idea, impression, concept. Make references to literature, film, philosophy, history, psychology, business, politics, etc.

Keep your comments brief, 10-50 words. Comment as often as you like.

What makes us listen to our conscience?