Tag Archives: course philosophy

Language Arts 9 Course Outline

Instructor: Mr D. Sader, St. Jerome’s Catholic School

1. Course Philosophy
The aim of the English Language Arts is to encourage an understanding and appreciation of the importance and artistry of literature in students. It will enable students to use language confidently and competently for a variety of purposes, with a variety of audiences and in a variety of situations for communication, personal satisfaction and learning.

In St. Jerome’s Catholic School, the students are invited to look further and develop a more coherent understanding of what language means as both a Christian event and a human event. Facility with language provides us with the ability to express ourselves and our faith in words, and to communicate, listen, and enter into dialogue and true relationships with others. Higher-level thinking skills of inquiring, reasoning and reporting are recognized as particular gifts from God, bringing with them special responsibilities to use such talents for the good of the community. Students are invited to consider how the knowledge, skills and values studied within the language arts curriculum are integrated with other subject areas, including religious education and reflect the Catholic identity of the school.

2. General Outcomes/Themes:
English Language Arts General Outcomes 9 (2000)

Through listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and representing the students will:

  1. explore thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences.
  2. comprehend and respond personally and critically to oral, print and other media texts
  3. manage ideas and information
  4. enhance the clarity and artistry of communication
  5. respect, support and collaborate with others.

Theme (Focus):
The Human Condition–In Search of Self

3. Assessment
Assessment in all classes will occur on a regular basis. Assessment strategies fit into two broad categories: Assessment FOR Learning(during), and Assessment OF learning(after).

Assessment FOR Learning occurs during instruction and looks like discussion, peer review, student meetings, sharing questions and answers, revision, rewriting, personal reflection. Example assessments during learning: “Start an Online Discussion,” “Hamlet IV,iv Discussion,” “Honour and Certainty,” “Pillars of Character,” “Group Novel Study,” “Story Study Guide.”

Assessment OF Learning occurs midway through or at the end or a unit of instruction and looks like high stakes tests, midterm and final exams, end of unit tests, portfolios. Example assessments after learning: “Applying for a Summer Job,” “Choices Essay,” “Portfolio 10,” “Hamlet: Final Response,” “ELA 30 Final Exam.”

Marks taken during assessments and evaluations will contribute toward the final grade. Each unit of study uses various types of evaluation such as exams, assignments, collaborations, presentations. The weighting of each mark contributes to the unit total while the weighting of each unit contributes to the overall course grade. Late assignments will not be accepted after the end of unit due dates. Refer to student handbook for appeals procedures.

Approximate Gradebook Category Weighting
Personal/Creative ~ 30%

  • short stories, scripts, narratives, poems, book reviews, book talk, forum posts, online class discussion, blog comments, reading logs, any other personal/creative response to a text

Critical/Analytical ~ 40%

  • essays, letters, speeches, debates, reports, character sketches, any other critical or analytical response to a text

Representing ~ 5%

  • posters, photo essay, images, videos, animations, tag clouds, podcasts, surveys, mobiles, dioramas, collages, and any other assorted “blog bling”

Final Exam ~ 25%

  • Provincial Achievement Test: multiple choice reading comprehension (55 marks of 110), business letter functional writing assignment(20/110), and an expository/essay or narrative writing assignment(35/110).

4. Course Work and Evaluation
Quarter 1 Marks collected from course beginning to 1st report card cut-off
Quarter 2 Marks collected from course beginning to semester break cut-off.
Quarter 3 Marks collected from course beginning to 3rd report card cut-off.
Quarter 4 Marks collected from course beginning to final exam.

Provincial Achievement Test ~ 25%(Part A: May TBA; Part B: June TBA)

5. Primary Resources
Crossroads 9, Gage/Nelson Educational Publishing
Novel, TBA

Students will receive only one copy of each text according to the rental agreement. Additional/replacement texts may be purchased through the school office.

Reading List

Students are encouraged, but not required, to bring their own electronic internet devices into the classroom. These devices include and are not limited to laptops (any OS), Chromebooks, smartphones, tablets, ebook readers etc, etc, etc. Basically, if the device can browse the school’s website via the school’s enterprise class wi-fi network, it would be useful in the classroom (most days). Student use of any device must comply with the School Acceptable Use Policy.

Completion of English Language Arts 9 requires the writing of 2 provincial achievement tests in May and June.

Alberta Education Resources for Parents

“My Child’s Learning”: Learn More About English Language Arts

English Language Arts 20 Course Outline

Instructor: Mr. D. Sader, St. Jerome’s Catholic School

1. Course Philosophy
The Alberta English Language Arts Program emphasizes lifelong applications of Language Arts skills. Language use reflects the inter-relatedness of the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and representing. Language is used to communicate understandings, ideas and feelings, to assist social and personal development, and to mediate thought processes. Language expansion occurs primarily through active involvement in language situations. Through writing the student can learn to clarify thought, emotion, and experience, and to share ideas, emotion and experiences with others. Literature is an integrated part of language learning.

In St. Jerome’s Catholic School, the students are invited to look further and develop a more coherent understanding of what language means as both a Christian event and a human event. Facility with language provides us with the ability to express ourselves and our faith in words, and to communicate, listen, and enter into dialogue and true relationships with others. Higher-level thinking skills of inquiring, reasoning and reporting are recognized as particular gifts from God, bringing with them special responsibilities to use such talents for the good of the community.

2. General Outcomes/Themes:
The study of English language arts enables each student to understand and appreciate the significance and artistry of literature. As well, it enables each student to understand and appreciate language and to use it confidently and competently for a variety of purposes, with a variety of audiences and in a variety of situations for communication, personal satisfaction, and learning.

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to

  • explore thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences.
  • comprehend literature and other texts in oral, print, visual and multimedia forms, and respond personally, critically and creatively.
  • manage ideas and information.
  • create oral, print, visual and multimedia texts, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication.
  • respect, support and collaborate with others.

The learning outcomes are interrelated and interdependent; each is to be achieved through a variety of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and representing experiences. Senior high school students engage all six language arts as they study texts and as they create their own texts in relevant situations for a variety of purposes and audiences. The classroom community, available resources, peer assistance, cooperation, individual motivation and teacher leadership will all assist growth. The application of computer technology in the writing process is essential for success.

Themes:
Decisions–Action or Apathy
The Human Condition–In Search of Self
World Perspectives–The Social Experience
Equality–Pain and Pride
Environment and Technology–Reality and Responsibility

Literature Texts:

  • Novel
  • Book-length Nonfiction or Feature Film
  • Modern Play
  • Shakespearean Play
  • Poetry (including song)
  • Short Story
  • Visual and Multimedia Text (including short films, video clips, photographs)
  • Essay
  • Popular Nonfiction (including news stories, feature articles, reviews, and other forms of informative and persuasive text)

Personal and Analytical/Critical Response Forms:

  • Narrative (factual and fictional)
  • Informative and Persuasive (essay, commentary, article, and review)
  • Poetry
  • Script
  • Oral, Visual, Multimedia (presentation, short film, photo essay, reader’s theatre, demonstration, prepared speech)

3. Assessment
Assessment in all classes will occur on a regular basis. Assessment strategies fit into two broad categories: Assessment FOR Learning(during), and Assessment OF learning(after).

Assessment FOR Learning occurs during instruction and looks like discussion, peer review, student meetings, sharing questions and answers, revision, rewriting, personal reflection. Example assessments during learning: “Start an Online Discussion,” “Hamlet IV,iv Discussion,” “Honour and Certainty,” “Pillars of Character,” “Group Novel Study,” “Story Study Guide.”

Assessment OF Learning occurs midway through or at the end or a unit of instruction and looks like high stakes tests, midterm and final exams, end of unit tests, portfolios. Example assessments after learning: “Applying for a Summer Job,” “Choices Essay,” “Portfolio 10,” “Hamlet: Final Response,” “ELA 30 Final Exam.”

Marks taken during assessments and evaluations will contribute toward the final grade. Each unit of study uses various types of evaluation such as exams, assignments, collaborations, presentations. The total point scored of each mark contributes to the overall course grade. Late assignments will not be accepted after the end of unit due dates.

Total Point Weighting
Personal/Creative

  • short stories, scripts, narratives, poems, book reviews, book talk, forum posts, online class discussion, blog comments, reading logs, any other personal/creative response to a text

Critical/Analytical

  • essays, letters, speeches, debates, reports, character sketches, any other critical or analytical response to a text

Representing

  • posters, photo essay, images, videos, animations, tag clouds, podcasts, surveys, mobiles, dioramas, collages, and any other assorted “blog bling”

Final Exam 25%

4. Final Evaluation

  • Report Card 1: Marks collected from course beginning to 1st report card cut-off
  • Final Report Card: Marks collected from course beginning to final exam.
  • School Final Exam 25% (Date TBA)

5. Primary Resources
Students will receive only one copy of each text according to the rental agreement. Additional/replacement texts may be purchased through the school office.
Reading List.
TBA: many free online sources, sites, etexts will be used.

Students are encouraged, but not required, to bring their own electronic internet devices into the classroom. These devices include and are not limited to laptops (any OS), Chromebooks, smartphones, tablets, ebook readers etc, etc, etc. Basically, if the device can browse the school’s website via the school’s enterprise class wi-fi network, it would be useful in the classroom (most days). Student use of any device must comply with the School Acceptable Use Policy.

6. ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 versus ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2
The ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 course sequence provides an opportunity to study texts with an increased emphasis on critical analysis. Texts studied are often “literary” in nature and relate to cultural and societal issues. These courses are designed for students who aspire to careers that require a broader application of skill to a generalized level.

The ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2 course sequence provides for the study of texts at a variety of levels of sophistication to meet the needs of students who are more diverse in terms of aspirations and abilities. Texts studied often have specific applications to careers or daily living. The courses focus on developing effective communication strategies and supporting students in enhancing their skills for text study and text creation.

Both ELA 30-1 and 30-2 serve as prerequisites for a senior high school diploma; however, not all post-secondary institutions accept ELA 30-2 for entry. In general, students who plan to attend a post-secondary institution need to familiarize themselves with the entry requirements of the institution and the program they plan to enter.

Completion of English Language Arts 30-1 or 30-2 requires the writing of a provincial diploma examination.

2011-2012 Senior High Curriculum Handbook for Parents: Catholic Version

ALberta Education: Learn More About The 20-Level English Language Arts Courses

English Language Arts 10 Course Outline

1. Course Philosophy
The Alberta English Language Arts Program emphasizes lifelong applications of Language Arts skills. Language use reflects the inter-relatedness of the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and representing. Language is used to communicate understandings, ideas and feelings, to assist social and personal development, and to mediate thought processes. Language expansion occurs primarily through active involvement in language situations. Through writing the student can learn to clarify thought, emotion, and experience, and to share ideas, emotion and experiences with others. Literature is an integrated part of language learning.

In St. Jerome’s Catholic School, the students are invited to look further and develop a more coherent understanding of what language means as both a Christian event and a human event. Facility with language provides us with the ability to express ourselves and our faith in words, and to communicate, listen, and enter into dialogue and true relationships with others. Higher-level thinking skills of inquiring, reasoning and reporting are recognized as particular gifts from God, bringing with them special responsibilities to use such talents for the good of the community.

2. General Outcomes/Themes:
The study of English language arts enables each student to understand and appreciate the significance and artistry of literature. As well, it enables each student to understand and appreciate language and to use it confidently and competently for a variety of purposes, with a variety of audiences and in a variety of situations for communication, personal satisfaction, and learning.

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to

  • explore thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences.
  • comprehend literature and other texts in oral, print, visual and multimedia forms, and respond personally, critically and creatively.
  • manage ideas and information.
  • create oral, print, visual and multimedia texts, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication.
  • respect, support and collaborate with others.

The learning outcomes are interrelated and interdependent; each is to be achieved through a variety of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and representing experiences. Senior high school students engage all six language arts as they study texts and as they create their own texts in relevant situations for a variety of purposes and audiences. The classroom community, available resources, peer assistance, cooperation, individual motivation and teacher leadership will all assist growth. The application of computer technology in the writing process is essential for success.

Themes:
Decisions–Action or Apathy
The Human Condition–In Search of Self
World Perspectives–The Social Experience
Equality–Pain and Pride
Environment and Technology–Reality and Responsibility

3. Assessment
Assessment in all classes will occur on a regular basis. Assessment strategies fit into two broad categories: Assessment FOR Learning(during), and Assessment OF learning(after).

Assessment FOR Learning occurs during instruction and looks like discussion, peer review, student meetings, sharing questions and answers, revision, rewriting, personal reflection. Example assessments during learning: “Start an Online Discussion,” “Hamlet IV,iv Discussion,” “Honour and Certainty,” “Pillars of Character,” “Group Novel Study,” “Story Study Guide.”

Assessment OF Learning occurs midway through or at the end or a unit of instruction and looks like high stakes tests, midterm and final exams, end of unit tests, portfolios. Example assessments after learning: “Applying for a Summer Job,” “Choices Essay,” “Portfolio 10,” “Hamlet: Final Response,” “ELA 30 Final Exam.”

Marks taken during assessments and evaluations will contribute toward the final grade. Each unit of study uses various types of evaluation such as exams, assignments, collaborations, presentations. The weighting of each mark contributes to the unit total while the weighting of each unit contributes to the overall course grade. Late assignments will not be accepted after the end of unit due dates. Refer to student handbook for appeals procedures.

Approximate Gradebook Category Weighting
Personal/Creative ~ 30%

  • short stories, scripts, narratives, poems, book reviews, book talk, forum posts, online class discussion, blog comments, reading logs, any other personal/creative response to a text

Critical/Analytical ~ 40%

  • essays, letters, speeches, debates, reports, character sketches, any other critical or analytical response to a text

Representing ~ 5%

  • posters, photo essay, images, videos, animations, tag clouds, podcasts, surveys, mobiles, dioramas, collages, and any other assorted “blog bling”

Final Exam ~ 25%

4. Course Work and Evaluation

Unit 1 ~ 37.5% Determined from marks collected from course beginning to 1st report card cut-off

Unit 2 ~ 37.5% Determined from marks collected from 1st report card cut-off to final exam.

School Final Exam ~ 25% (Date TBA)

5. Primary Resources
Students will receive only one copy of each text according to the rental agreement. Additional/replacement texts may be purchased through the school office.
Reading List

6. ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 versus ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2
The ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 course sequence provides an opportunity to study texts with an increased emphasis on critical analysis. Texts studied are often “literary” in nature and relate to cultural and societal issues. These courses are designed for students who aspire to careers that require a broader application of skill to a generalized level.

The ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2 course sequence provides for the study of texts at a variety of levels of sophistication to meet the needs of students who are more diverse in terms of aspirations and abilities. Texts studied often have specific applications to careers or daily living. The courses focus on developing effective communication strategies and supporting students in enhancing their skills for text study and text creation.

Both ELA 30-1 and 30-2 serve as prerequisites for a senior high school diploma; however, not all post-secondary institutions accept ELA 30-2 for entry. In general, students who plan to attend a post-secondary institution need to familiarize themselves with the entry requirements of the institution and the program they plan to enter.

Completion of English Language Arts 30-1 or 30-2 requires the writing of a provincial diploma examination.

Senior High Curriculum at a Glance (pdf)

English Language Arts 30 Course Outline

1. Course Philosophy
The Alberta English Language Arts Program emphasizes lifelong applications of Language Arts skills. Language use reflects the inter-relatedness of the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and representing. Language is used to communicate understandings, ideas and feelings, to assist social and personal development, and to mediate thought processes. Language expansion occurs primarily through active involvement in language situations. Through writing the student can learn to clarify thought, emotion, and experience, and to share ideas, emotion and experiences with others. Literature is an integrated part of language learning.

In St. Jerome’s Catholic School, the students are invited to look further and develop a more coherent understanding of what language means as both a Christian event and a human event. Facility with language provides us with the ability to express ourselves and our faith in words, and to communicate, listen, and enter into dialogue and true relationships with others. Higher-level thinking skills of inquiring, reasoning and reporting are recognized as particular gifts from God, bringing with them special responsibilities to use such talents for the good of the community.

2. General Outcomes/Themes:
The study of English language arts enables each student to understand and appreciate the significance and artistry of literature. As well, it enables each student to understand and appreciate language and to use it confidently and competently for a variety of purposes, with a variety of audiences and in a variety of situations for communication, personal satisfaction, and learning.

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to

  • explore thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences.
  • comprehend literature and other texts in oral, print, visual and multimedia forms, and respond personally, critically and creatively.
  • manage ideas and information.
  • create oral, print, visual and multimedia texts, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication.
  • respect, support and collaborate with others.

The learning outcomes are interrelated and interdependent; each is to be achieved through a variety of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and representing experiences. Senior high school students engage all six language arts as they study texts and as they create their own texts in relevant situations for a variety of purposes and audiences. The classroom community, available resources, peer assistance, cooperation, individual motivation and teacher leadership will all assist growth. The application of computer technology in the writing process is essential for success.

Themes:
Decisions–Action or Apathy
The Human Condition–In Search of Self
World Perspectives–The Social Experience
Equality–Pain and Pride
Environment and Technology–Reality and Responsibility

3. Assessment
Assessment in all classes will occur on a regular basis. Assessment strategies fit into two broad categories: Assessment FOR Learning(during), and Assessment OF learning(after).

Assessment FOR Learning occurs during instruction and looks like discussion, peer review, student meetings, sharing questions and answers, revision, rewriting, personal reflection. Example assessments during learning: “Start an Online Discussion,” “Hamlet IV,iv Discussion,” “Honour and Certainty,” “Pillars of Character,” “Group Novel Study,” “Story Study Guide.”

Assessment OF Learning occurs midway through or at the end or a unit of instruction and looks like high stakes tests, midterm and final exams, end of unit tests, portfolios. Example assessments after learning: “Applying for a Summer Job,” “Choices Essay,” “Portfolio 10,” “Hamlet: Final Response,” “ELA 30 Final Exam.”

Marks taken during assessments and evaluations will contribute toward the final grade. Each unit or text of study uses various types of evaluation such as exams, assignments, collaborations, presentations. The total number of points of each mark contributes to the course total while the weighting of the final exam contributes to the overall course grade. Late assignments will not be accepted after the report card cut-off dates.

Course Work Total Point Weighting
Personal/Creative

  • short stories, scripts, narratives, poems, book reviews, book talk, forum posts, online class discussion, blog comments, reading logs, any other personal/creative response to a text

Critical/Analytical

  • essays, letters, speeches, debates, reports, character sketches, any other critical or analytical response to a text

Representing

  • posters, photo essay, images, videos, animations, tag clouds, podcasts, surveys, mobiles, dioramas, collages, and any other assorted “blog bling”

Final Exam 25% or course total points.

4. Course Work and Diploma Evaluation
Course Work: 38.5%
School Final Exam 12.5% (Date TBA)
Diploma Exam 50% (Date TBA )

5. Primary Resources
Reading List

6. ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 versus ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2
The ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 course sequence provides an opportunity to study texts with an increased emphasis on critical analysis. Texts studied are often “literary” in nature and relate to cultural and societal issues. These courses are designed for students who aspire to careers that require a broader application of skill to a generalized level.

The ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2 course sequence provides for the study of texts at a variety of levels of sophistication to meet the needs of students who are more diverse in terms of aspirations and abilities. Texts studied often have specific applications to careers or daily living. The courses focus on developing effective communication strategies and supporting students in enhancing their skills for text study and text creation.

Both ELA 30-1 and 30-2 serve as prerequisites for a senior high school diploma; however, not all post-secondary institutions accept ELA 30-2 for entry. In general, students who plan to attend a post-secondary institution need to familiarize themselves with the entry requirements of the institution and the program they plan to enter.

Completion of English Language Arts 30-1 or 30-2 requires the writing of a provincial diploma examination.

Diploma Exemplars
Diploma Guides
Diploma Practice @ Quest A+
Diploma Tips
Visuals
Senior High Curriculum at a Glance (pdf)

Religion 35: Relating

1. Course Philosophy
Participants in the program are encouraged to explore the human search for meaning using the resources of personal inquiry and significant spiritual traditions. In order for the search to be truly meaningful, it must be connected to the individual’s personal inquiry. For adolescents, relationships are where they often seek and find meaning in their lives.

Their relationship to the world around them is often shaped by television, peers, music, etc. From these and other sources, they will build relationships which may be life-denying, while at other times, be life-saving. Regardless, they will continue to search for ways which will bring them into closer relationship with the self, others, and God.

By the end of this course students will be required to present their philosophy of life. To accomplish this they are required to analyze written and audio/visual material. Students are required to demonstrate their knowledge of the material and to use it to form a personal philosophy.

The formation of a Christian philosophy is based upon the concept that life is graciousness. Christ reveals life’s goodness to us.

This course builds upon the concepts of Religion 15 and Religion 25.

2. General Outcomes/Themes
The student will:

  • Examine spirituality in a variety of world religions (Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Judaism, Islam)
  • Examine some philosophical building blocks for ethics and morality (Socrates, Plato, Aristotle)
  • Understand the impact of revelation and sacred scripture upon ethics and morality (St. Paul, St. Augustine, St. Aquinas)
  • Understand themselves as moral persons (Focus Questions on The Human Condition)
  • Acknowledge the spiritual dimension of relationships (ie. What does it mean to “live with the Spirit”?)

3. Assessment
A person’s relationship with God is a matter of conscience, the internal forum of the soul. God alone is the arbiter of souls (and then again, who can plumb the depths of Divine Mercy?). It is important, therefore, that we avoid the grading or evaluation of a student’s faith.

We grade the knowledge the student has acquired based on the program of studies and the skills the student is able to show in articulating his/her knowledge.

A wide range of assessment information is used in the development of a student’s final grade. Individualized assessments provide specific information regarding student progress and overall performance in class. Student assessment may vary from student to student to adapt to differences in student needs, learning styles, preferences, and paces. Not all assignments are used for assessment.

Course Work and Evaluation
Unit 1 37.5% Determined from marks collected from course beginning to 1st report card cut-off
Unit 2 37.5% Determined from marks collected from 1st report card cut-off to final exam.

  • Comparative World Religions: 25%
  • Course work: 50% (may include assignments, presentations, journals, reviews, notes, research projects, portfolios, exams and quizzes)
  • Final Examination: 25%

4. Primary Resources
Sophie’s World, Jostein Gaarder

World Religions activities

In Search of the Good: A Catholic Understanding of Moral Living, Concacan, CCCB, Ottawa, Ontario, 2004

World Religions: A Voyage of Discovery, Jeffrey Brodd, St. Mary’s Press, Christian Brothers Publishers, Winona, Minn. 1998.

Additional Resources

Religion 15: Belonging

1. Course Philosophy
The Senior High Religious Studies Program engages students in the Search for Meaning. The approach does not limit or deny any stage of adolescent psychological or spiritual growth. Instead, it offers to adolescents a way of realizing and fulfilling their possibilities as human beings.

The course on Belonging is intended to help students understand what it means to be “fully alive.” It does so by recognizing that one of the primary needs of adolescents is to experience a sense of belonging. In seeking to belong, they question and challenge those values which will eventually become convictions worth sharing with others. In their quest to find meaning in belonging, there is the constant interaction between what the gospel teaches and the human experience.

2. General Outcomes/Themes
The student will:

  • Explore an overview of world religions(Judaism, Christianity, Islam)
  • Examine the principles that guide Catholics in understanding their role in shaping culture
  • Understand that belonging to the Christian community involves witness and service.
  • Understand how the work of Jesus continues in the world through the Catholic Church.
  • Explore relationships with self, others and God from a Catholic perspective.

3. Assessment
A person’s relationship with God is a matter of conscience, the internal forum of the soul. God alone is the arbiter of souls (and then again, who can plumb the depths of Divine Mercy?). It is important, therefore, that we avoid the grading or evaluation of a student’s faith.

We grade the knowledge the student has acquired based on the program of studies and the skills the student is able to show in articulating his/her knowledge.

A wide range of assessment information is used in the development of a student’s final grade. Individualized assessments provide specific information regarding student progress and overall performance in class. Student assessment may vary from student to student to adapt to differences in student needs, learning styles, preferences, and paces. Not all assignments are used for assessment.

Course Work and Evaluation

  1. Christian Action Assignment: 15% (suggested minimum hours of service = 10 – typically these would not be instructional hours)
  2. Comparative World Religions: 20%
  3. Course work: 65% (may include assignments, presentations, journals, reviews, notes, research projects, portfolios, exams and quizzes)

4. Primary Resources
Christ and Culture, Concacan, Ottawa, Ontario, 2001

Exploring the Religions of our World, Nancy Clemmons, Ave Maria Press, Notre Dame, Indiana. 1999.

Religion 25: Believing

1. Course Philosophy
The program addresses real life issues. What do I believe about myself, others, God? How am I to live my life? In the search to find answers to such questions, adolescents will make decisions.

The beliefs adolescents hold will greatly influence the choices they make. For the most part, their beliefs are not solidified. They still have many discoveries to make before they settle for life-long commitments. But for now, they search.

2. General Outcomes/Themes
The student will:

  • Explore how believing is integral to human living.
  • Investigate the role of truth, goodness, the spiritual and religious community in the search to believe.
  • Explore believing in the Great Religions of the East, Hinduism and Buddhism.
  • Study the Bible as a source of Christian belief.
  • Understand the message of Jesus.
  • Identify ways in which Christians cooperate in bringing about the Reign of God.

Theme:
Believing is Integral to Human Living

3. Assessment
A person’s relationship with God is a matter of conscience, the internal forum of the soul. God alone is the arbiter of souls (and then again, who can plumb the depths of Divine Mercy?). It is important, therefore, that we avoid the grading or evaluation of a student’s faith.

We grade the knowledge the student has acquired based on the program of studies and the skills the student is able to show in articulating his/her knowledge.

A wide range of assessment information is used in the development of a student’s final grade. Individualized assessments provide specific information regarding student progress and overall performance in class. Student assessment may vary from student to student to adapt to differences in student needs, learning styles, preferences, and paces. Not all assignments are used for assessment.

4. Course Work and Evaluation
5 Credits:

  1. Christian Action Assignment ~ 15% (suggested minimum hours of service = 10 – typically these would not be instructional hours)
  2. Course work: ~ 55% (may include assignments, presentations, journals, reviews, notes, research projects, portfolios, exams and quizzes)
  3. Final Exam: ~ 25%

3 Credits:

  1. Course work: ~ 75% (may include assignments, presentations, journals, reviews, notes, research projects, portfolios, exams and quizzes)
  2. Final Exam: ~ 25%

5. Primary Resources
Hengel, Dr. John van den, et al. World Religions: A Canadian Catholic Perspective. Nelson, 1970.
O’Malley, William J. Building Your Own Conscience (Batteries Not Included). Tabor Pub., 1992.
Linn, Dennis, et al. Good Goats: Healing Our Image of God. Paulist Press, 1993.
Young, William P. The Shack: Where Tragedy Confronts Eternity. Windblown Media, 1970,

Reading List