Tag Archives: Novel

While you read…Brave New World

Using the format of a blog, comment at the end of each reading session on both the substance of your reading and its effects on you.

Record pages or sections on which you are commenting. Record your impressions of characters, events, conflicts, descriptions. Record responses to your own questions. Record questions about the novel as you read. Respond to course focus questions.

Make sure you take the time after, during, or before each reading session to make an entry into your blog. 10-15 sentences per reading session might be enough.

Make each entry interesting, personal, intelligent. Avoid retelling the story or simply “dumbing-down” the text. Write posts that engages your readers in critical thinking, enhances their attention span, and fills them with speculative awe.

Write several short posts per week, once a day at least. Write longer posts when your mood strikes you. Tag each post before publishing. Use categories such as the following to keep your responses organized:

Utopia
Community, Identity, Stability
Science and Technology
Conditioning
Soma
Sensual Pleasures
Religion
Family Life
Death
Skinner
Kohlberg
Piaget
Erikson
Freud
Adler
Thoreau

Track the posts you make and the comments you send and receive in a spreadsheet. Try to spend no more than 15 minutes on the computer per class. If that isn’t enough, do more work at home or during spare time. There is a need for quite, concentrated reading time during your day. Here we go.

Novel Study Preflight Checklist

Read a Novel from the Reading List:

Tracback a “map” of your response here.

Apathy versus Action(LOTF)

Read, Lord of the Flies, by William Golding. Discuss the novel with the following focus: How and why must we act upon our knowledge, values, and abilities for the well-being of others?
Related Questions:

  • How can we justify a position or action?
  • What moves us to action? What forces encourage apathy?
  • How can we act to make our views and decisions felt?
  • How can society be improved?
  • Does conforming to the beliefs and actions of the majority make a person a “good citizen”?

Trackback.

UPDATE:
Extra Credit: Contribute and embed the following discussion of archetypes into your post using the PostRSS plugin.

[rsslist:http://forum.stjschool.org/rss.php?tid=170]

Gutenberg Books

from Gutenberg:
Easy
Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
Call of the Wild by Jack London
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

Medium
Lorna Doone by R. D. Blackmore
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
Two Years Before the Mast by Richard Henry Dana
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas père
Winesburg, Ohio; a group of tales of Ohio small town life by Sherwood Anderson
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
Silas Marner by George Eliot
Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Mark Twain
The Time Machine by H. G. Wells
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
Father Goriot by Honoré de Balzac
Tess of the d’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott
The Virginian, Horseman of the Plains by Owen Wister
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
The Country of the Pointed Firs by Sarah Orne Jewett
Main Street by Sinclair Lewis
Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw
The Playboy of the Western World by J. M. Synge
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
My Antonia by Willa Sibert Cather
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton

Difficult
The Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
The Portrait of a Lady — Volume 1 by Henry James
The Portrait of a Lady — Volume 2 by Henry James
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
Moby Dick, or, the whale by Herman Melville
Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
House of the Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
House of Mirth by Edith Wharton
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
The Return of the Native by Thomas Hardy