Tag Archives: personal goals

Computer Option 9 Course Outline

PHILOSOPHY AND RATIONALE
Computer Option 9 significantly overlaps the provincially developed Information Processing strand of Career and Technology Studies (CTS). Philosophy, rationale. general outcomes, and assessment instruments(rubrics) are derived from the provincially developed course with variations in delivery, instructional time, and level of difficulty to meet the needs of Grade 9 students.

The 5 periods per cycle of scheduled instructional time for this course includes additional instructional time for Language Arts 9.

GENERAL OUTCOMES
Within an applied context relevant to personal goals, aptitudes and abilities; the student in Computer Option 9 will:

  • demonstrate the basic knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for achievement and fulfillment in personal life
  • use technology effectively to link and apply appropriate tools, management and processes to produce a desired outcome
  • develop basic competencies by:
  • managing learning
  • managing resources
  • communicating effectively
  • working with others
  • demonstrating responsibility

SPECIFIC OUTCOMES
INF1020 Keyboarding 1
Detailed Outcomes
50% 3 ALL KEYS Tests scored over 20 wpm. Tests must be passed consecutively within the same five day period.
40% Exercises, drills, timings.
10% Workstation Routines

INF2030 Keyboarding 2
Detailed Outcomes
50% 6 ALL KEYS Tests scored over 30 wpm. Tests must be passed consecutively within the same five day period.
40% Exercises, drills, timings.
10% Workstation Routines

INF1030 Word Processing 1
Detailed Outcomes
10% Planning
50% Final Project: A portfolio
30% Technical Skills
10% Workstation Routines

INF1040 Graphic Tools
Detailed Outcomes
10% Planning
50% Final Project: A portfolio
30% Technical Skills
10% Workstation Routines

INF1060 Spreadsheet 1
Detailed Outcomes
45% Technical Skills: Creation
45% Technical Skills: Manipulation
10% Workstation Routines

INF1070 HyperMedia Tools
Detailed Outcomes
10% Storyboard
50% Final Project
30% Technical Skills
10% Workstation Routines

INF2200 Information Highway 2
Detailed Outcomes
70% Design Skills and Editing; text, graphics, style; accuracy, grammar, quality
20% Planning: research, preparation, basic functions
10% Workstation Routines

ASSESSMENT
Each module will be assessed with cumulative averaging. Final grades will be assigned to completed modules only. Assessment weightings/rubrics are derived from the provincially developed courses. Prompts for writing assignments are derived from the concurrent delivery of Language Arts 9.

Information Processing General Outcomes

PHILOSOPHY AND RATIONALE
Information Processing 10 significantly overlaps the provincially developed Information Processing strand of Career and Technology Studies (CTS). Philosophy, rationale. general outcomes, and assessment instruments(rubrics) are derived from the provincially developed course with variations in delivery, instructional time, and level of difficulty to meet the needs of Grade 10 students.

GENERAL OUTCOMES
Within an applied context relevant to personal goals, aptitudes and abilities; the student in Information Processing 10 will:

  • demonstrate the basic knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for achievement and fulfillment in personal life
  • use technology effectively to link and apply appropriate tools, management and processes to produce a desired outcome
  • develop basic competencies by:
  • managing learning
  • managing resources
  • communicating effectively
  • working with others
  • demonstrating responsibility

SPECIFIC OUTCOMES
INF1020 Keyboarding 1
Detailed Outcomes
50% 3 ALL KEYS Tests scored over 20 wpm. Tests must be passed consecutively within the same five day period.
40% Exercises, drills, timings.
10% Workstation Routines

INF2030 Keyboarding 2
Detailed Outcomes
50% 6 ALL KEYS Tests scored over 30 wpm. Tests must be passed consecutively within the same five day period.
40% Exercises, drills, timings.
10% Workstation Routines

INF1030 Word Processing 1
Detailed Outcomes
10% Planning
50% Final Project: A portfolio
30% Technical Skills
10% Workstation Routines

INF1040 Graphic Tools
Detailed Outcomes
10% Planning
50% Final Project: A portfolio
30% Technical Skills
10% Workstation Routines

INF1060 Spreadsheet 1
Detailed Outcomes
45% Technical Skills: Creation
45% Technical Skills: Manipulation
10% Workstation Routines

INF1070 HyperMedia Tools
Detailed Outcomes
10% Storyboard
50% Final Project
30% Technical Skills
10% Workstation Routines

INF2200 Information Highway 2
Detailed Outcomes
70% Design Skills and Editing; text, graphics, style; accuracy, grammar, quality
20% Planning: research, preparation, basic functions
10% Workstation Routines

ASSESSMENT
Each module is a one credit course and will be assessed with cumulative averaging. Final grades will be assigned to completed modules only. Assessment weightings/rubrics are derived from the provincially developed courses.

World Perspectives–The Social Experience

Once and for all you can know there’s a universe of people outside and you’re responsible to it. – A. Miller

One of the challenges highlighted in history and in literature is striking the balance between individual and societal rights and responsibilities; between personal goals and societal needs; between personal ambition and the common good; between personal values and social values.

Beyond Personal Goals–Individual, Group, and Societal Responsibility
What are our responsibilities to others?
Related Questions:

  • What is our place in society?
  • What are our responsibilities to self? To society? To future generations?
  • How do we balance self-preservation with concern for others?
  • What are our individual rights and responsibilities? What might be our responsibilities and rights as members of particular groups within society?
  • What are our societal rights and responsibilities? Does society count on us as individuals? If so how?
  • What actions are expected of individuals within a society?
  • How does society ensure there is respect for both individuals and for groups?

Dealing with Universal Issues, such as Truth and Justice
What is “truth” and what is “justice”?
Related Questions:

  • How do we define “truth” and “justice”?
  • What are the important truths in life?
  • How do we find truth? How do we tell right from wrong?
  • What are the rights of all?
  • Why is justice often hard to achieve? Is justice fair? Infallible?
  • Why does justice sometimes “sting”? How do we remedy injustice?
  • Are there situations in which it is more just to treat people differently than to treat them the same?

Ambition, Power, and the Common Good
What is the nature of ambition and power?
Related Questions:

  • What gives a person status? Is status achieved the same way in all societies? Within a society?
  • How do ambition and power drive us? How do they challenge us?
  • What is meant by “the common good”? Who decides what the common good is? Is the common good best for every individual in a society?
  • What is the appeal of being in the position of “ruling” other people? What disadvantages accompany being the authority figure?
  • How does lack of power affect particular individuals or groups?
  • What is the reality of being colonized or “ruled”?
  • What is the advantage in treating others as we wish they would treat us? Why is this often difficult?

Social Criticism–Conformity and Nonconformity/ Resistance
What is social criticism?
Related Questions:

  • What societal issues concern us?
  • What is the purpose of social criticism?
  • What is conformity? What is nonconformity? What is meant by “the status quo”? What is rebellion? Do different people define these differently? Are they manifested differently in different societies?
  • What is the role of the state in Canada? What is the role of the individual or groups within the state?
  • How should the state treat its citizens? Is this the same in every country?
  • What is the relationship between the individual and the state in Canada? In other countries?
  • What are the shortcomings of Canadian society? How can we, as citizens, address them?
  • Why do some individuals or groups challenge the system while others abide with it? What is political protest? How does Canadian society treat nonconformity? Rebellion? Is rebellion risky in Canada as compared to other countries? Why or why not?
  • How does Canadian society respond to challenges?

Addressing the Issues–Causes and Crusades
How can we make the world a better place?
Related Questions:

  • What matters most to us as individuals? As groups? As a society?
  • Do all people tackle causes in their lifetimes? Why or why not? What causes might our generation tackle?
  • What do people do when faced with a decision between advancing a cause and doing what they believe is right?
  • Are there situations in which individuals might challenge authority? What are some responsible ways of challenging authority?

English Language Arts General Outcomes 10, 20, 30(2003)

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view, and represent to:
1. Explore thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences

  • discover possibilities
    • form tentative understandings, interpretations, and positions
    • experiment with language, image, and structure
  • extend awareness
    • consider new perspectives
    • express preferences, and expand interests
    • set personal goals for language growth

2. Comprehend literature and other texts in oral, print, visual, and multimedia forms, and respond personally, critically, and creatively.

  • respond to a variety of print and nonprint texts
    • connect self, text, culture, milieu
    • evaluate the verisimilitude, appropriateness, and significance of print and nonprint texts
    • appreciate the effectiveness and artistry of print and nonprint texts
  • construct meaning form text and context
    • discern and analyze context
    • understand and interpret content
    • engage prior knowledge
    • use reference strategies and reference technologies
  • understand and appreciate textual forms, elements, and techniques
    • relate form, structure, and medium to purpose, audience, and content
    • relate elements, devices, and techniques to created effects

3. Manage ideas and information

  • determine inquiry or research requirements
    • focus on purpose and presentation form
    • plan inquiry or research, and identify information needs and sources
  • follow a plan of inquiry
    • select, record, and organize information
    • evaluate sources, and assess information
    • form generalizations and conclusions
    • review inquiry or research process and findings

4. Create oral, print, visual, and multimedia texts, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication

  • develop and present a variety of print and nonprint texts
    • assess text creation content
    • consider and address form, structure, and medium
    • develop content
    • use production, publication, and presentation strategies and technologies consistent with context
  • improve thoughtfulness, effectiveness, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication
    • enhance thought and understanding and support and detail
    • enhance organization
    • consider and address matters of choice
    • edit text for matters of correctness

5. Respect, support, and collaborate with others

  • respect others and strengthen community
    • use language and image to show respect and consideration
    • appreciate diversity of expression, opinion, and perspective
    • recognize accomplishments and events
  • work within a group
    • cooperate with others and contribute to group processes
    • understand and evaluate group processes

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View English Language Arts Curriculum PDF(ELA10-1, ELA10-2, ELA20-1, ELA20-2, ELA30-1, ELA30-2)