Tag Archives: publication

English Language Arts General Outcomes 10, 20, 30(2003)

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view, and represent to:
1. Explore thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences

  • discover possibilities
    • form tentative understandings, interpretations, and positions
    • experiment with language, image, and structure
  • extend awareness
    • consider new perspectives
    • express preferences, and expand interests
    • set personal goals for language growth

2. Comprehend literature and other texts in oral, print, visual, and multimedia forms, and respond personally, critically, and creatively.

  • respond to a variety of print and nonprint texts
    • connect self, text, culture, milieu
    • evaluate the verisimilitude, appropriateness, and significance of print and nonprint texts
    • appreciate the effectiveness and artistry of print and nonprint texts
  • construct meaning form text and context
    • discern and analyze context
    • understand and interpret content
    • engage prior knowledge
    • use reference strategies and reference technologies
  • understand and appreciate textual forms, elements, and techniques
    • relate form, structure, and medium to purpose, audience, and content
    • relate elements, devices, and techniques to created effects

3. Manage ideas and information

  • determine inquiry or research requirements
    • focus on purpose and presentation form
    • plan inquiry or research, and identify information needs and sources
  • follow a plan of inquiry
    • select, record, and organize information
    • evaluate sources, and assess information
    • form generalizations and conclusions
    • review inquiry or research process and findings

4. Create oral, print, visual, and multimedia texts, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication

  • develop and present a variety of print and nonprint texts
    • assess text creation content
    • consider and address form, structure, and medium
    • develop content
    • use production, publication, and presentation strategies and technologies consistent with context
  • improve thoughtfulness, effectiveness, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication
    • enhance thought and understanding and support and detail
    • enhance organization
    • consider and address matters of choice
    • edit text for matters of correctness

5. Respect, support, and collaborate with others

  • respect others and strengthen community
    • use language and image to show respect and consideration
    • appreciate diversity of expression, opinion, and perspective
    • recognize accomplishments and events
  • work within a group
    • cooperate with others and contribute to group processes
    • understand and evaluate group processes

text_study.pngtext_creation1.png
View English Language Arts Curriculum PDF(ELA10-1, ELA10-2, ELA20-1, ELA20-2, ELA30-1, ELA30-2)

Hotlinking Images? We have all done it. Warnings!Warnings!Warnings!

When adding an image to your page on iblog.stjschool.org with a link to an image on another site, you may get unexpected results. This is called hotlinking: when images appear to be embedded on your page, but are simply linked to someone else’s page.

Advantages: no bandwidth or disk quota used from your account because you are not storing/delivering the image here.

Disadvantage: many “smart” sites forbid and display a 404 error. Some may just limit to a finite number, say 5 visits per day. Unscrupulous sites will surprise your visitors with a redirected hotlink path to images you didn’t want to show. YIKES! Hence, HOT- linking, as in play with fire? … gonna get burned.

The ethics of “hotlinking” can be equated to the ethics of stealing an image without the original author’s permission. Look for a “you are forbidden” message. But that’s not all, a web server can simply detect a hotlinked image and replace it with anything they like. Be warned, if I can program the snowotherway server to refer all attempts at hotlinking to a 404.html file, so can any other. Judge wisely, test and retest a “hotlinked” image before committing it to publication. Unscrupulous webservers fight this “theft” in unscrupulous ways, so be very careful.

Now, a smart web host, like snowotherway, will use server settings to eliminate the practice of “hotlinking” into your file folders to “steal” our bandwidth. And, no, I won’t refer redirects to “unscrupulous” images.

Commercial sites like Amazon.ca, and imdb.com, may even encourage the practice of hotlinking for obvious commercial reasons. But they are huge, have tonnes of bandwidth, and they may profit if you follow an image from their site.

Conclusion, a human is the only judge of what a picture image on the ‘net looks like. No computer or software can actually “see” an image. So be warned, what you tell another site to deliver in an image to your web page, may not be what your visitors get.

Out,

D. Sader