Tag Archives: response

While you read…Brave New World

Using the format of a blog, comment at the end of each reading session on both the substance of your reading and its effects on you.

Record pages or sections on which you are commenting. Record your impressions of characters, events, conflicts, descriptions. Record responses to your own questions. Record questions about the novel as you read. Respond to course focus questions.

Make sure you take the time after, during, or before each reading session to make an entry into your blog. 10-15 sentences per reading session might be enough.

Make each entry interesting, personal, intelligent. Avoid retelling the story or simply “dumbing-down” the text. Write posts that engages your readers in critical thinking, enhances their attention span, and fills them with speculative awe.

Write several short posts per week, once a day at least. Write longer posts when your mood strikes you. Tag each post before publishing. Use categories such as the following to keep your responses organized:

Utopia
Community, Identity, Stability
Science and Technology
Conditioning
Soma
Sensual Pleasures
Religion
Family Life
Death
Skinner
Kohlberg
Piaget
Erikson
Freud
Adler
Thoreau

Track the posts you make and the comments you send and receive in a spreadsheet. Try to spend no more than 15 minutes on the computer per class. If that isn’t enough, do more work at home or during spare time. There is a need for quite, concentrated reading time during your day. Here we go.

English 30 Poetry Assignment

Respond to each of the following in a well-considered post in your blog.
Limit your selection of detail to a separate poem for each response.

  1. Explain how image and symbol reinforce theme in a poem.
  2. Explain how facts about a writer’s life are relevant to your understanding of a poem.
  3. Explain how a poem can reflect a poet’s personal psychology.
  4. Explain how your own experiences affect your interpretation of a poem.

Trackback each post here.

Religion 25 Final Exam New Revised

Would God enjoy a game of Bingo? Yahtzee? Battleship? Texas Hold’em? Would God enjoy the lottery? Just a random (rhetorical) thought.

Anyway, determine which questions have been randomly assigned to you. You can choose to do only the Short Answer questions you’ve been assigned. The Essay is worth 30%. Your grade will not exceed 100%. Good luck.

Short Answer:

  1. (___/4) What is the difference between Faith and superstition?
  2. (___/1) What was the inscription at Delphi?
  3. (___/2) Is there such thing as Natural Modesty?
  4. (___/2) How can Sophists be objectively wrong?
  5. (___/2) What did the Pre-Socratics think about Fate and Sickness?
  6. (___/6) How are Jesus and Socrates alike?
  7. (___/2) In Greek mythology, who was Hermes?
  8. (___/3) What is the difference between a Sophist and a Philosopher?
  9. (___/2) What did Socrates mean when he said, “He who knows what good is will do good?”
  10. (___/2) Explain Plato’s … “a longing to return to the realm of the soul.”
  11. (___/3) Describe Plato’s Academy.
  12. (___/6) According to Plato, what is the relationship of man to the State?
  13. (___/2) Can you have true knowledge about something in a constant state of change?
  14. (___/2) Who would make a better sculptor, Plato or Aristotle?
  15. (___/2) Are we born with innate ideas?
  16. (___/2) For Aristotle, contrast living and non-living.
  17. (___/2) What does Aristotle mean by “The First Mover”?
  18. (___/5) Indicate the factors that contribute to the formation of a person’s philosophy of life.
  19. (___/2) Why did Sophie’s teacher giver her an A on her Religious knowledge test? Why could he have given her a D?
  20. (___/2) What is the difference between Eastern and Western mysticism?
  21. (___/2 ) Why were Cynics happy?
  22. (___/2) What did Diogenes say to Alexander the Great?
  23. (___/2) Why are legal statutes unnecessary to Stoics?
  24. (___/2) What desire was common to all of the Hellenistic philosophers?
  25. (___/2) Who are the “garden philosophers”? Why?
  26. (___/2) Would Plotinus enjoy basketball or volleyball?
  27. (___/2) What does Aquinas believe are the two paths to God?
  28. (___/1) What inscription did Paul find on an alter?
  29. (___/1) What does “Sophia” mean?
  30. (___/2) When we talk about Socarates and Jesus, what dangers do we come across?
  31. (___/3) Who were the three great kings of Israel?
  32. (___/4) What was Paul’s revolutionary philosophy of God?
  33. (___/2) What was God’s covenant with Abraham and his seed?
  34. (___/6) What is the difference between the Indo-European and Semite origins?
  35. (___/1) What scared Sophie and Joanna about the postcards?
  36. (___/3) Should non-Jews first become Jewish before becoming a Christian?
  37. (___/2) What did Jesus call God that was unprecedented in the Jewish community?
  38. (___/2) Name the capitals of the Eastern and Western Empires?
  39. (___/1) What is the Latin word for Pope?
  40. (___/4) What epochs surrounded the middle ages?
  41. (___/1) The word “Christ” is a Greek translation of what Hebrew word meaning “the anointed one”?
  42. (___/4) Compare and Contrast Plato with St. Augustine.
  43. (___/2) Who was the female follower of Paul?
  44. (___/6) What three cultures emerged from the Divided Roman Empire?
  45. (___/3) “Almost all medieval philosophy centered on this one question.” What is this question?
  46. (___/2) What did St. Augustine say about Free Will?
  47. (___/2) Who was St. Thomas Aquinas’s famous teacher?
  48. (___/2) From where does evil originate?
  49. (___/4) How do you discern God’s will?

Essay
What, if anything, do the cookies we have shared during this class have to do with philosophy? Consider any of the following or come up with your own reasons.

Fate put them here and it is their destiny to be eaten – Pre Socratics

They are a message from the Gods. – Hermes

They were bought and paid for. – Sophists

Cookies, when did we have cookies? – anonymous absentee student

They are longing to return to the realm of the soul. – Plato

They are from Delphi – Know Thy Cookie!

They are created by a First Baker. – Aristotle

I don’t know. – Socrates

It’s better than Hemlock. – Socrates

The existence of appetite shows man’s place in society. – Plato

Cookies? What cookies? These are mere shadows. – Plato

These cookies will not eat themselves, they are nonliving. – Aristotle

The abundance of cookies only demonstrates the appeal of a Golden Mean. – Aristotle

The abundance of cookies demonstrates that the ideal is immutable. – Plato

The cookies are here because the task was required for homework. – Sophie’s Teacher.

The cookies are a portal to a parallel hyper-reality in which we are the ideas. – Alberto Knox

Attach your completed rubric and “fortune” to your response.
holistic.png

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Creative Response: English 30

Choose from the following:

(Partner up if/where necessary)

  1. Write a folk song.
  2. Create a dialogue in the forums between any 2(or more) authors.
  3. Create a dialogue in the forums b etween any 2 or more characters
  4. Create a new scene to be inserted into a text synthesizing a character(or 2) from outside the text.

Trackback. Then rewrite the quiz on Steinbeck’s Chrysanthemums.(Post questions in the forums.)

Should machines be “smarter” than humans?

Start here(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technological_singularity).

Are any of Huxley’s machines “smart”? Does Huxley’s future have any need for computation? Why, why not?

Consider Huxley, what would be a “predicted future event believed to precede immense technological progress in an unprecedentedly brief time”?(Look at a the real world goal of Zyvex)

Is Asimov enough?

What would Young Macduff give as a cheeky response to the “rise of the machines”?

Bloggiest start to the bloggiest year ever.

What a funny word, “bloggiest”. Should I say it is a “most bloggy” start to the year? Does correct English matter in a blog?

All students I teach have begun a blog, of sorts. For the most part, I’ve insisted the content of the blog must be school or course related, the myriad responses to Macbeth fit this category. Other responses are more like “snowflakes”, snowflakes is my term to describe the phenomena of no two responses to the same prompt being identical.

I aggregate(not related to the term aggravate) RSS feeds from each class to aid in tracking down assigned work. Each student has a spreadsheet I term the Data Collector that averages rubric scores and totals moderated comment feeds, too. I then collect the Data Collectors periodically to determine scores to enter into GradeLogic. The data collectors serve a dual purpose, a foundation to build a grade obviously, but a powerful device to bring a landslide of peer pressure and collaborative assistance on the lazy, slower, or reluctant bloggers. Those that finish first have always shown a willingness to “share their secrets” with others.

Students are also instructed to collect and deposit appropriate comments on each other’s blogs, too. It is proving to be a fine art to learn to comment. Last year I found the aspect of commenting to be more valuable than the creation of the posts. Comments must contain evidence of critical thinking, I said, not simply “gladhanding”. If you troll the blogs you’ll notice the biggest difference right now between a veteran blogger and a newbie is the quality/quantity of appropriate comments. Students complete work earlier to benefit from positive/any attention from peer “commentors”. Any student who doesn’t get their blog post done on time, gets punished by receiving low or no rubric scores from their peers. However, unlike class discussions, the very nature of blogging allows anyone to catch up at any time. The students themselves seem to have an unofficial pecking order for who writes the best comments. They have internalized their own standards for what they will accept as a comment on their blog and are very persuasive at convincing each other to measure up. A few students are positively verbose and comment on all they can. Others choose fewer responses yet measure their words very carefully. Those that finish writing a post early, are left to hustle remaining students.

The grade 10s are shifting their attention to Keyboarding modules for a while, although I keep prodding them about “Turing Tests”. iGod is our most recent fascination.

The grade 9s get their prompts from Mrs. Fraser’s class then I help them become a bit more tech savvy.

The Grade 11s are in the midst of Macbeth and may see no reprieve for at least 2 more weeks, I figure. The more traditional assignments I’ve used for the last 14 years are as appropriate in a blog as they have ever been in my class. Doing it with blogs is just so cool!

Three Questions – by Leo Tolstoy

One day it occurred to a certain emperor that if he only knew the answers to three questions, he would never stray in any matter.

What is the best time to do each thing? Who are the most important people to work with? What is the most important thing to do at all times?

The emperor issued a decree throughout his kingdom announcing that whoever could answer the questions would receive a great reward. Many who read the decree made their way to the palace at once, each person with a different answer. Continue reading