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Hamlet: After Act 1 and 2(English 30)

Major Response
(30-1)”I know not seems.” In I, ii, 76, Hamlet claims that his grief is real, not just a show. Make a chart of all the occasions in Act 1 and 2 when there is a difference between the way a character seems to be and the way he or she really is. Create your summary with the following headings:

  • The Character
  • The Situation
  • The Appearance
  • The Reality
  • The Reason for Hiding the Truth

Fill in your ideas about the characters’ behaviour and compare your summary with those of other students.

(30-2)Consider whether or not you think Polonius is a good father. Explain which of his actions were right and which were wrong. Create your own description of a good father. Write a letter to Polonius offering him advice about ways he could become a better parent.

Act 1&2 Considerations:

  1. Why did Marcellus and Bernardo ask Horatio to join them during their watch? What character traits does Horatio possess that would suggest they were right in asking him to join them?
  2. Imagine you were a talk show host, interviewing the newly crowned Claudius, King of Denmark. In a series of questions and answers, review the information provided in I,ii.
  3. Describe the Hamlet revealed in I,ii.
  4. Imagine you are an advice columnist and have received a question that deals with Laertes’ or Ophelia’s situation. Write the question and the response using exact phrases from Acts 1&2.
  5. Write a diary entry in which Ophelia or Laertes recounts some of the advice she or he has received and how she or he feels about the advice.
  6. In 1594, Thomas Nashe speculated why the devil often appeared in the likeliness of a parent or relative: “No other reason can be given of it but this, that in those shapes which he supposeth most familiar unto us, and that we are inclined to with a natural kind of love, we will sooner hearken to him than otherwise.” Hamlet’s friends offer him reasons to not trust the apparition of his father. Summarize these reasons. How does Hamlet respond and what does this show about his character?
  7. Knowing what he knows (in I,v), could Hamlet march into the castle and accuse Claudius of Murder? What would happen if Hamlet attempted to kill Claudius immediately? Write a short scene following Act 1 in which Hamlet accuses Claudius or attempts to kill.
  8. Imagine you are Reynaldo, in Paris, and conversing with a Dane about Laertes’ activities. Write a dialogue in which you follow Polonius’ instructions.
  9. Claudius, Gertrude, and Polonius all have differing opinions on the source of Hamlet’s madness. What are they?
  10. Read the First Player’s speech carefully. Outline what it has in common in terms of characters and situations with what has transpired in the Danish court.

Religion 25 Final Exam New Revised Key

KEY KEY KEY KEY KEY KEY KEY KEY KEY KEY KEY KEY

  1. (___/4) What is the difference between Faith and superstition?
    (Pg.48)
    Faith : Is that you believe in something and that is predestined, you have the ability to reason, logic and logos.
    Superstition is Emotion and Imagination.
    1. Can something come from nothing?
    2. God Exists?
    3. Immortal Soul?
    4. Man’s free will?
  2. (___/1) What was the inscription at Delphi?
    (Pg.53)
    – know thyself.
  3. (___/2) Is there such thing as Natural Modesty?
    (Pg.58)
    -No Society decides and Sophists
    (pg 63) Social conventions
  4. (___/2) How can Sophists be objectively wrong?
    (Pg.63)
    – No absolute norms.
    – What is right is in vogue.
    – They teach for money.
  5. (___/2) What did the Pre-Socratics think about Fate and Sickness?
    (Pg.53)
    – They believed that Fate controls history
    -Sickness is a result of Divine intervention
  6. (___/6) How are Jesus and Socrates alike?
    (Pg.66)
    -Enemies of the state
    -Spoke on behalf of a greater truth.
    -Their activities and beliefs cost them their lives.
    -could have abandoned faith to survive.
    other
  7. (___/2) In Greek mythology who was Hermes?
    (Pg. 60)
    -The messenger of the god.
    -the God of Sea Travelers.
  8. (___/3) What is the difference between a Sophist and a Philosopher?
    (pg. 62) Sophists reject philosophy
    (Pg.67)
    – Sophist: takes money for their teachings.
    – They are satisfied with what they know or what they think they know but really don’t .
    Philosopher: Knows that in reality he knows very little but constantly strives to achieve true insight.
  9. (___/2) What did Socrates mean when he said “He who knows what good is will do good?”
    (pg 69)(59)
    – the right insight leads to the right action.
    – “only he who does right can be a virtuous man.”
  10. (___/2) Explain Plato’s … “a longing to return to the realm of the soul…”
    (pg 85) to see utter perfection
    (Pg.89) – Ideals exist , reality is shadow.
    (Pg.101) – “Idea of chicken before “real ” chicken.
  11. (___/3) Describe Plato’s Academy.
    Located in Athens.
    – Academies ( The Great Hero)
    – Philosophy , Mathematics, Gym. Later: Science
  12. (___/6) According to Plato, what is the relationship of man to Sate?
    (Pg.91)
    -Head > Reason > Wisdom > Rulers
    – Chest >Will > Courage > Auxiliaries
    – Abdomen > Appetite > Temperance > Laborer’s
  13. (___/2) Can you have true knowledge about something in a constant state of change?
    (Pg.87)
    -Plato: No ideals exist in Realm of Ideas.
    – no thing is immutable only Ideals are real.
  14. (___/2) Who would make a better sculptor, Plato or Aristotle?
    (Pg. 109) – Plato would be a better sculptor but it would take longer to get the results because he needs perfection.
  15. (___/2) Are we born with innate ideas?
    (Pg.108)
    Plato: Yes Forgotten ideas that respond to re-teaching.
    Aristotle: No Only innate Reason
  16. (___/2) For Aristotle, contrast living and non-living.
    (pg 113)
    a. Living has “potentiality for change.”
    b. Nonliving can only change by external influence.
  17. (___/2) What does Aristotle mean by “The First Mover”?
    (Pg.114)
    – God moves the stars
    – God remains at rest (something from nothing)
  18. (___/5) Indicate the factors that contribute to the formation of a person’s philosophy of life.
    (Pg.124)
    – Environment and social situation
    (extra) – 4 postulates.
  19. (___/2) Why did Sophie’s teacher giver her an A on her Religious knowledge test? Why could he have given her a D?
    (Pg.126)
    It is important to have a personal point of view
    – her answers were right
    didn’t do her homework.
  20. (___/2) What is the difference between Eastern and Western mysticism?
    (p. 137,138) east=union with cosmic spirit in this world(material – internal)
    west=transformation/portation to a place above and beyond(ideal – outside)
  21. (___/2 ) Why were Cynics happy?
    (130) With nothing because Happiness does not exist in external advantages as luxury, power, health.
  22. (___/2) What did Diogenes say to Alexander the Great?
    (130) “Stand aside, you’re blocking my sun”
  23. (___/2) Why are legal statutes unnecessary to Stoics?
    (131)
    Laws were incomplete imitations of Natural Laws embedded in Nature. Naturals laws apply to everyone, including slaves.
  24. (___/2) What desire was common to all of the Hellenistic philosophers?
    (130)
    To discover how mankind should best live and die. (Ethics)
  25. (___/2) Who are the “garden philosophers”? Why?
    (133)Epicureans in his garden
  26. (___/2) Would Plotinus enjoy basketball or volleyball?
  27. (___/2) What does Aquinas believe are the two paths to God?
    -through faith and the Christian Revelation
    -through reason and the senses-181
  28. (___/1) What inscription did Paul find on an alter?
    -“To the unkown God”-161
  29. (___/1) What does “Sophia” mean?
    -in Greek, the female side of God-186
  30. (___/2) When we talk about Socarates and Jesus, what dangers do we come across?
    -Socrates: we saw how dangerous it could be to appeal to people’s reason
    -Jesus: we see how dangerous it can be to demand unconditional brotherly love and unconditional forgiveness-159
  31. (___/3) Who were the three great kings of Israel?
    Saul, David, and Soloman-156
  32. (___/4) What was Paul’s revolutionary philosophy of God?
    God “dwelleth not in temples made with hands”
    A personal God who intervenes in the course of history-162
  33. (___/2) What was God’s covenant with Abraham and his seed?
    That Abraham and all his seed would keep the Lord’s commandments. In exchange God would protect all the children of Abraham-155
  34. (___/6) What is the difference between the Indo-European and Semite origins?
    Indo-Europeans: life is continuous circle without beginning many gods(Buddhism, Hinduism)
    Semites: life is a time line with a creation and a day of judgment one God(Xty, Judaism, Islam) 152-153
  35. (___/1) What scared Sophie and Joanna about the postcards?
    One was postmarked for today-146
  36. (___/3) Should non-Jews first become Jewish before becoming a Christian?
    Paul said it was unnecessary
    Christianity is more than a Jewish sect
    The “Old Covenant” between God and Israel has been replaced by the “New Covenant” by Jesus between God and Man-163
  37. (___/2) What did Jesus call God that was unprecedented in the Jewish community?
    Father, Abba-158
  38. (___/2) Name the capitals of the Eastern and Western Empires?
    Constantinople and Rome, -171
  39. (___/1) What is the Latin word for Pope?
    Papa – 173
  40. (___/4) What epochs surrounded the middle ages?
    Roman(400AD)
    Renaissance(1400AD)
  41. (___/1) The word “Christ” is a Greek translation of what Hebrew word meaning “the anointed one”?
    Messiah
  42. (___/4) Compare and Contrast Plato with St. Augustine.
    Both: ideas originate in the Divine mind/realm.
    Augustine: God created world from void, Plato: world always existed.(p177)
  43. (___/2) Who was the female follower of Paul?
    Damaris(162)
  44. (___/6) What three cultures emerged from the Divided Roman Empire?
    Latinized Christian West from Rome(aka Roman Catholic)
    Greek Christian East from Constantinople(aka Byzantium, Byzantine)
    Islamic Muslim from North Africa, Middle East, Spain(aka Arabic)(173-4)
  45. (___/3) “Almost all medieval philosophy centered on this one question.” What is this question?
    Must we simply believe Christian revelation or can we approach the Christian truths with the help of reason?
    What was the relationship between the Greek philosophers and what the Bible said?
    Was there a contradiction between the Bible and reason, or were belief and knowledge compatible?(175)
  46. (___/2) What did St. Augustine say about Free Will?
    We have free will but God has foreseen how we will live.(178)
  47. (___/2) Who was St. Thomas Aquinas’s famous teacher?
    Albert the Great(187)
  48. (___/2) From where does evil originate?
    absence of God, man’s disobedience, falling away from God’s work.(177)
  49. (___/4) How do you discern God’s will?
    -answers will vary

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Prepare for English Language Arts Finals

For those in the midst, or looking ahead at finals in my LA classes(9, 10-1, 20-1, 20-2, 30-1, 30-2).

Consider the outcomes we’ve tried to achieve.

Enhancing the artistry of communication has been a strong technical focus. Skills mastered include using online blogging tools, Word Processing, Spreadsheets, even graphical enhancements using Photoshop or audio/video podcasting tools have been included where time permitted and initiative taken. Participation on an online forum has generated a myriad of useful tips/reminders, questions/answers. There will be no speadsheets on the final, the use of Word will be necessary for English 30.

Each course has been structured around Focus Questions and related questions: English 10, English 9.

Emphasis on social networking, peer review/support/criticism has been critical for developing critical thought and reflection for writers defending an idea.

Each course has a reading list: English 10, English 30. Not every title has been studied intensively(or at all), but the proportion of attention paid to those pieces that were studied in class deserve the same level of attention on the final. Of course, those who choose additional literature from the list to focus on in the final deserve to have that initiative rewarded as well. If you choose to focus on Shakespeare, your audience gets tougher, I’ve noticed.

An English 30 paper looking at how the images/symbols/archetypes of Sophocles and Kingsolver relate to personal freedom to would be intriguing. Why not an English 10 paper discussing the threat of fanaticism by comparing the speeches of Mark Antony, Joseph Strorm, and Eamon De valera? What does Søren Kierkegaard have to do with every page you’ve ever read or written?

Extras, everyone should be able to link to Wikipedia for literary terms, difficult vocabulary, or just the odd or eccentric idea; can anyone incorporate the Hayflick Limit into their paper? Everyone has seen video and heard an mp3, but are any daring enough to Podcast their final essay? A carefully edited U2 mp3 snip, an embedded flash video of Ophelia Simpson, a slideshow?

rubric.pngThe only limit is to abide the first line of every rubric you’ve ever attached to any assignment:

I _________________ honestly declare that the work is what I have done. In circumstances when I have quoted a certain authority, I have clearly indicated what is a quote and the author. 

A Blogger’s Code of Ethics contains truths far older than the phenomenon of blogging.

English 30s will have no access to internet, filesharing, etc etc. English 10s can have it all.

My Mother’s Kitchen

  1. Use pencil crayons to draw a picture of your mother’s kitchen.
  2. Put the oven in it, and also something green, and something dead.
  3. Write a poem about your mother’s kitchen.
  4. You are not in this poem, but some female relation – aunt, sister, close friend – must walk into the kitchen during the course of the poem.
  5. Completed poems, with a suitable image(72 dpi, png, lightbox), should appear in your blog and trackback here.

A lesson on single point perspective. Hint: Tiles need an extra diagonal, too.

So I was listening to Music from the Junos . . .(RS25)

The lyrics from K-OS’s, “Heaven Only Knows,” struck a chord with something we had been discussing in class about “mysticism.”

Discuss the following K-OS lyrics based on what we’ve learned when comparing Western and Eastern Mysticism.

Have a careful listen to a variety of current or classic tunes by a variety of recording artists.

Which artists demonstrate our understanding of Western Mysticism, which are clearly Eastern, are any a little of each?

Continue reading

When the basic needs are met, then what?(RS 25)

400px-maslows_hierarchy_of_needs.png
Today we asked if there was something all humans strive for after all needs have been met. Of course, only a philosopher can imagine a world in which all needs could be met.

But there must be something to the question asked of Sophie: Is there something else that all humans, all times and all places, need?

Maslow can help.

In the News(CTS bloggers)

CBC RSS feeds. Browse the many RSS feed categories. Select at least one to be added to your blog’s sidebar.

  • Copy(right-click or control-click) a feed url from CBC RSS feeds.
  • Go to Dashboard–>Presentation–>Sidebar Widgets–>Add RSS widgets.
  • Drag RSS widget to your sidebar.
  • Paste the url into the RSS widget.
  • Save and view site.

Here’s an idea that could snowball!

Find a “copyright-free” etext online at, say, Project Gutenberg or here or here

Start a new blog.

Parse your etext into manageable chunks and insert into your blog.

Add graphics and organizers. Edit theme. Voila.

Look at Castle of Otranto and The Jesuit Relations and the History of New France as examples.

Search for works by the following at Gutenberg:
Austen, Jane
Barrie, J.M.
Brontà«, Charlotte
Brontà«, Emily
Dickens, Charles
Burroughs, Edgar Rice
Carroll, Lewis
Chesterton, G. K
Christie, Agatha
Twain, Mark
Collins, Wilkie
Connor, Ralph
Conrad, Joseph
Corelli, Marie
Defoe, Daniel
De la Mare, Walter
Doyle, Arthur Conan, Sir
Eliot, George
Galsworthy, John
Haggard, H. Rider
Hardy, Thomas
Henty, G. A.
James, Henry
Jerome, Jerome K.
Joyce, James
Kingsley, Charles
Kipling, Rudyard
Leacock, Stephen
Mansfield, Katherine
Maugham, W. Somerset
Maupassant, Guy de
McClung, Nellie L.
Melville, Herman
Montgomery, L. M.
Moodie, Susanna
Moore, Clement Clarke
Nesbit, E.
Oppenheim, E. Phillips
Potter, Beatrix
Sabatini, Rafael
Scott, Walter, Sir
Shaw, George Bernard
Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft
Sinclair, Upton
Stevenson, Robert Louis
Stoker, Bram
Swift, Jonathan
Thackeray, William Makepeace
Trollope, Anthony
Wallace, Edgar
Walpole, Horace
Wells, H. G.
Wilde, Oscar
Wodehouse, P. G.
Woolf, Virginia
Yonge, Charlotte Mary

Bloggiest start to the bloggiest year ever.

What a funny word, “bloggiest”. Should I say it is a “most bloggy” start to the year? Does correct English matter in a blog?

All students I teach have begun a blog, of sorts. For the most part, I’ve insisted the content of the blog must be school or course related, the myriad responses to Macbeth fit this category. Other responses are more like “snowflakes”, snowflakes is my term to describe the phenomena of no two responses to the same prompt being identical.

I aggregate(not related to the term aggravate) RSS feeds from each class to aid in tracking down assigned work. Each student has a spreadsheet I term the Data Collector that averages rubric scores and totals moderated comment feeds, too. I then collect the Data Collectors periodically to determine scores to enter into GradeLogic. The data collectors serve a dual purpose, a foundation to build a grade obviously, but a powerful device to bring a landslide of peer pressure and collaborative assistance on the lazy, slower, or reluctant bloggers. Those that finish first have always shown a willingness to “share their secrets” with others.

Students are also instructed to collect and deposit appropriate comments on each other’s blogs, too. It is proving to be a fine art to learn to comment. Last year I found the aspect of commenting to be more valuable than the creation of the posts. Comments must contain evidence of critical thinking, I said, not simply “gladhanding”. If you troll the blogs you’ll notice the biggest difference right now between a veteran blogger and a newbie is the quality/quantity of appropriate comments. Students complete work earlier to benefit from positive/any attention from peer “commentors”. Any student who doesn’t get their blog post done on time, gets punished by receiving low or no rubric scores from their peers. However, unlike class discussions, the very nature of blogging allows anyone to catch up at any time. The students themselves seem to have an unofficial pecking order for who writes the best comments. They have internalized their own standards for what they will accept as a comment on their blog and are very persuasive at convincing each other to measure up. A few students are positively verbose and comment on all they can. Others choose fewer responses yet measure their words very carefully. Those that finish writing a post early, are left to hustle remaining students.

The grade 10s are shifting their attention to Keyboarding modules for a while, although I keep prodding them about “Turing Tests”. iGod is our most recent fascination.

The grade 9s get their prompts from Mrs. Fraser’s class then I help them become a bit more tech savvy.

The Grade 11s are in the midst of Macbeth and may see no reprieve for at least 2 more weeks, I figure. The more traditional assignments I’ve used for the last 14 years are as appropriate in a blog as they have ever been in my class. Doing it with blogs is just so cool!