Tag Archives: theme

Parent Guide: A Lifeline for Lions

This week in class, we’re reading “A Lifeline for Lions ” by Pamela S. Turner.

In the informational text “A Lifeline for Lions,” Pamela S. Turner discusses an outbreak of a disease that negatively impacted Serengeti National Park’s lion population in 1994.

As we read, we will be discussing the themes of CommunityMan vs. Nature, and Social Change & Revolution as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“Who’s in control: man or nature?”, “How do people create change?”, and “What is the importance of community?”

Ways to support your child:

Parent Guide: Coping Mechanisms

This week in class, we’re reading “Coping Mechanisms” by CommonLit Staff.

In “Coping Mechanisms,” the author explains the difference between adaptive and maladaptive coping mechanisms.

As we read, we will be discussing the theme of Resilience & Success as it relates to the text. We are trying to answer this big question :

“How does a person overcome adversity?”

Ways to support your child:

Parent Guide: Working at the Hospital

This week in class, we’re reading “Working at the Hospital” by Barbara Radner.

In the informational text “Working at the Hospital,” Barbara Radner describes the different jobs at the hospital.

As we read, we will be discussing the theme of Community as it relates to the text. We are trying to answer this big question :

“What is the importance of community?”

Ways to support your child:

Parent Guide: Nice Chimps

This week in class, we’re reading “Nice Chimps” by Emily Sohn.

In the informational text “Nice Chimps,” Emily Sohn discusses a study that explores the altruistic nature of young children and chimpanzees.

As we read, we will be discussing the theme of Education & Knowledge as it relates to the text. We are trying to answer this big question :

“How do we understand the world around us?”

Ways to support your child:

Parent Guide: College students with disabilities are too often excluded

This week in class, we’re reading “College students with disabilities are too often excluded” by Christa Bialka.

In the informational text, “College students with disabilities are too often excluded,” Christa Bialka discusses how students with disabilities are not included in many on-campus activities.

As your child reads, they will be considering the themes of Community and Prejudice & Discrimination as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“What is the importance of community?” and “What are the effects of prejudice?”

Ways to support your child:

 

English 30 Poetry Assignment

Respond to each of the following in a well-considered post in your blog.
Limit your selection of detail to a separate poem for each response.

  1. Explain how image and symbol reinforce theme in a poem.
  2. Explain how facts about a writer’s life are relevant to your understanding of a poem.
  3. Explain how a poem can reflect a poet’s personal psychology.
  4. Explain how your own experiences affect your interpretation of a poem.

Trackback each post here.

Creat a Sitemap for your blog

Write a page(not a post). Title it Sitemap.
You’ll find the code here that you’ll need to paste into your page.

Enter Sitemap as the Page Slug.
Disable Comments and Pings.
Publish.

Go to Dashboard–>Options–>DDSitemapGen.
Enter the same Slug, update.

Add the link to the sitemap via your theme’s menu or sidebar or add a Pages widget.

Here’s an idea that could snowball!

Find a “copyright-free” etext online at, say, Project Gutenberg or here or here

Start a new blog.

Parse your etext into manageable chunks and insert into your blog.

Add graphics and organizers. Edit theme. Voila.

Look at Castle of Otranto and The Jesuit Relations and the History of New France as examples.

Search for works by the following at Gutenberg:
Austen, Jane
Barrie, J.M.
Brontà«, Charlotte
Brontà«, Emily
Dickens, Charles
Burroughs, Edgar Rice
Carroll, Lewis
Chesterton, G. K
Christie, Agatha
Twain, Mark
Collins, Wilkie
Connor, Ralph
Conrad, Joseph
Corelli, Marie
Defoe, Daniel
De la Mare, Walter
Doyle, Arthur Conan, Sir
Eliot, George
Galsworthy, John
Haggard, H. Rider
Hardy, Thomas
Henty, G. A.
James, Henry
Jerome, Jerome K.
Joyce, James
Kingsley, Charles
Kipling, Rudyard
Leacock, Stephen
Mansfield, Katherine
Maugham, W. Somerset
Maupassant, Guy de
McClung, Nellie L.
Melville, Herman
Montgomery, L. M.
Moodie, Susanna
Moore, Clement Clarke
Nesbit, E.
Oppenheim, E. Phillips
Potter, Beatrix
Sabatini, Rafael
Scott, Walter, Sir
Shaw, George Bernard
Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft
Sinclair, Upton
Stevenson, Robert Louis
Stoker, Bram
Swift, Jonathan
Thackeray, William Makepeace
Trollope, Anthony
Wallace, Edgar
Walpole, Horace
Wells, H. G.
Wilde, Oscar
Wodehouse, P. G.
Woolf, Virginia
Yonge, Charlotte Mary

Moving, Graduating, Take your blog with you.

In your dashboard, under ‘Options/Reading’, you need to check that the number of posts under ‘Syndication feeds’ is set to At LEAST the number of posts in your blog, and that the feed is set to ‘Full text’ before saving it as an .xml file.(look for the xml link in browser bar or meta somewhere in your theme header/sidebar/footer)

In your new blog at “wordpress.com” or “edublogs.org” for example simply import the .xml file and you are back in business.

Sadly, once you are no longer a student at St. Jerome’s your blog is gone. (Usually I don’t get around to cleaning things up until the fall, though).