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Language Arts 9 Course Outline

Instructor: Mr D. Sader, St. Jerome’s Catholic School

1. Course Philosophy
The aim of the English Language Arts is to encourage an understanding and appreciation of the importance and artistry of literature in students. It will enable students to use language confidently and competently for a variety of purposes, with a variety of audiences and in a variety of situations for communication, personal satisfaction and learning.

In St. Jerome’s Catholic School, the students are invited to look further and develop a more coherent understanding of what language means as both a Christian event and a human event. Facility with language provides us with the ability to express ourselves and our faith in words, and to communicate, listen, and enter into dialogue and true relationships with others. Higher-level thinking skills of inquiring, reasoning and reporting are recognized as particular gifts from God, bringing with them special responsibilities to use such talents for the good of the community. Students are invited to consider how the knowledge, skills and values studied within the language arts curriculum are integrated with other subject areas, including religious education and reflect the Catholic identity of the school.

2. General Outcomes/Themes:
English Language Arts General Outcomes 9 (2000)

Through listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and representing the students will:

  1. explore thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences.
  2. comprehend and respond personally and critically to oral, print and other media texts
  3. manage ideas and information
  4. enhance the clarity and artistry of communication
  5. respect, support and collaborate with others.

Theme (Focus):
The Human Condition–In Search of Self

3. Assessment
Assessment in all classes will occur on a regular basis. Assessment strategies fit into two broad categories: Assessment FOR Learning(during), and Assessment OF learning(after).

Assessment FOR Learning occurs during instruction and looks like discussion, peer review, student meetings, sharing questions and answers, revision, rewriting, personal reflection. Example assessments during learning: “Start an Online Discussion,” “Hamlet IV,iv Discussion,” “Honour and Certainty,” “Pillars of Character,” “Group Novel Study,” “Story Study Guide.”

Assessment OF Learning occurs midway through or at the end or a unit of instruction and looks like high stakes tests, midterm and final exams, end of unit tests, portfolios. Example assessments after learning: “Applying for a Summer Job,” “Choices Essay,” “Portfolio 10,” “Hamlet: Final Response,” “ELA 30 Final Exam.”

Marks taken during assessments and evaluations will contribute toward the final grade. Each unit of study uses various types of evaluation such as exams, assignments, collaborations, presentations. The weighting of each mark contributes to the unit total while the weighting of each unit contributes to the overall course grade. Late assignments will not be accepted after the end of unit due dates. Refer to student handbook for appeals procedures.

Approximate Gradebook Category Weighting
Personal/Creative ~ 30%

  • short stories, scripts, narratives, poems, book reviews, book talk, forum posts, online class discussion, blog comments, reading logs, any other personal/creative response to a text

Critical/Analytical ~ 40%

  • essays, letters, speeches, debates, reports, character sketches, any other critical or analytical response to a text

Representing ~ 5%

  • posters, photo essay, images, videos, animations, tag clouds, podcasts, surveys, mobiles, dioramas, collages, and any other assorted “blog bling”

Final Exam ~ 25%

  • Provincial Achievement Test: multiple choice reading comprehension (55 marks of 110), business letter functional writing assignment(20/110), and an expository/essay or narrative writing assignment(35/110).

4. Course Work and Evaluation
Quarter 1 Marks collected from course beginning to 1st report card cut-off
Quarter 2 Marks collected from course beginning to semester break cut-off.
Quarter 3 Marks collected from course beginning to 3rd report card cut-off.
Quarter 4 Marks collected from course beginning to final exam.

Provincial Achievement Test ~ 25%(Part A: May TBA; Part B: June TBA)

5. Primary Resources
Crossroads 9, Gage/Nelson Educational Publishing
Novel, TBA

Students will receive only one copy of each text according to the rental agreement. Additional/replacement texts may be purchased through the school office.

Reading List

Students are encouraged, but not required, to bring their own electronic internet devices into the classroom. These devices include and are not limited to laptops (any OS), Chromebooks, smartphones, tablets, ebook readers etc, etc, etc. Basically, if the device can browse the school’s website via the school’s enterprise class wi-fi network, it would be useful in the classroom (most days). Student use of any device must comply with the School Acceptable Use Policy.

Completion of English Language Arts 9 requires the writing of 2 provincial achievement tests in May and June.

Alberta Education Resources for Parents

“My Child’s Learning”: Learn More About English Language Arts

English Language Arts 20 Course Outline

Instructor: Mr. D. Sader, St. Jerome’s Catholic School

1. Course Philosophy
The Alberta English Language Arts Program emphasizes lifelong applications of Language Arts skills. Language use reflects the inter-relatedness of the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and representing. Language is used to communicate understandings, ideas and feelings, to assist social and personal development, and to mediate thought processes. Language expansion occurs primarily through active involvement in language situations. Through writing the student can learn to clarify thought, emotion, and experience, and to share ideas, emotion and experiences with others. Literature is an integrated part of language learning.

In St. Jerome’s Catholic School, the students are invited to look further and develop a more coherent understanding of what language means as both a Christian event and a human event. Facility with language provides us with the ability to express ourselves and our faith in words, and to communicate, listen, and enter into dialogue and true relationships with others. Higher-level thinking skills of inquiring, reasoning and reporting are recognized as particular gifts from God, bringing with them special responsibilities to use such talents for the good of the community.

2. General Outcomes/Themes:
The study of English language arts enables each student to understand and appreciate the significance and artistry of literature. As well, it enables each student to understand and appreciate language and to use it confidently and competently for a variety of purposes, with a variety of audiences and in a variety of situations for communication, personal satisfaction, and learning.

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to

  • explore thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences.
  • comprehend literature and other texts in oral, print, visual and multimedia forms, and respond personally, critically and creatively.
  • manage ideas and information.
  • create oral, print, visual and multimedia texts, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication.
  • respect, support and collaborate with others.

The learning outcomes are interrelated and interdependent; each is to be achieved through a variety of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and representing experiences. Senior high school students engage all six language arts as they study texts and as they create their own texts in relevant situations for a variety of purposes and audiences. The classroom community, available resources, peer assistance, cooperation, individual motivation and teacher leadership will all assist growth. The application of computer technology in the writing process is essential for success.

Themes:
Decisions–Action or Apathy
The Human Condition–In Search of Self
World Perspectives–The Social Experience
Equality–Pain and Pride
Environment and Technology–Reality and Responsibility

Literature Texts:

  • Novel
  • Book-length Nonfiction or Feature Film
  • Modern Play
  • Shakespearean Play
  • Poetry (including song)
  • Short Story
  • Visual and Multimedia Text (including short films, video clips, photographs)
  • Essay
  • Popular Nonfiction (including news stories, feature articles, reviews, and other forms of informative and persuasive text)

Personal and Analytical/Critical Response Forms:

  • Narrative (factual and fictional)
  • Informative and Persuasive (essay, commentary, article, and review)
  • Poetry
  • Script
  • Oral, Visual, Multimedia (presentation, short film, photo essay, reader’s theatre, demonstration, prepared speech)

3. Assessment
Assessment in all classes will occur on a regular basis. Assessment strategies fit into two broad categories: Assessment FOR Learning(during), and Assessment OF learning(after).

Assessment FOR Learning occurs during instruction and looks like discussion, peer review, student meetings, sharing questions and answers, revision, rewriting, personal reflection. Example assessments during learning: “Start an Online Discussion,” “Hamlet IV,iv Discussion,” “Honour and Certainty,” “Pillars of Character,” “Group Novel Study,” “Story Study Guide.”

Assessment OF Learning occurs midway through or at the end or a unit of instruction and looks like high stakes tests, midterm and final exams, end of unit tests, portfolios. Example assessments after learning: “Applying for a Summer Job,” “Choices Essay,” “Portfolio 10,” “Hamlet: Final Response,” “ELA 30 Final Exam.”

Marks taken during assessments and evaluations will contribute toward the final grade. Each unit of study uses various types of evaluation such as exams, assignments, collaborations, presentations. The weighting of each mark contributes to the unit total while the weighting of each unit contributes to the overall course grade. Late assignments will not be accepted after the end of unit due dates. Refer to student handbook for appeals procedures.

Gradebook Category Weighting
Personal/Creative 30%

  • short stories, scripts, narratives, poems, book reviews, book talk, forum posts, online class discussion, blog comments, reading logs, any other personal/creative response to a text

Critical/Analytical 40%

  • essays, letters, speeches, debates, reports, character sketches, any other critical or analytical response to a text

Representing 5%

  • posters, photo essay, images, videos, animations, tag clouds, podcasts, surveys, mobiles, dioramas, collages, and any other assorted “blog bling”

Final Exam 25%

4. Final Evaluation

  • Term 1 37.5% Marks collected from course beginning to 1st report card cut-off
  • Term 2 37.5% Marks collected from 1st report card cut-off to final exam.
  • School Final Exam 25% (Date TBA)

5. Primary Resources
Students will receive only one copy of each text according to the rental agreement. Additional/replacement texts may be purchased through the school office.
Reading List.
TBA: many free online sources, sites, etexts will be used.

Students are encouraged, but not required, to bring their own electronic internet devices into the classroom. These devices include and are not limited to laptops (any OS), Chromebooks, smartphones, tablets, ebook readers etc, etc, etc. Basically, if the device can browse the school’s website via the school’s enterprise class wi-fi network, it would be useful in the classroom (most days). Student use of any device must comply with the School Acceptable Use Policy.

6. ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 versus ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2
The ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 course sequence provides an opportunity to study texts with an increased emphasis on critical analysis. Texts studied are often “literary” in nature and relate to cultural and societal issues. These courses are designed for students who aspire to careers that require a broader application of skill to a generalized level.

The ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2 course sequence provides for the study of texts at a variety of levels of sophistication to meet the needs of students who are more diverse in terms of aspirations and abilities. Texts studied often have specific applications to careers or daily living. The courses focus on developing effective communication strategies and supporting students in enhancing their skills for text study and text creation.

Both ELA 30-1 and 30-2 serve as prerequisites for a senior high school diploma; however, not all post-secondary institutions accept ELA 30-2 for entry. In general, students who plan to attend a post-secondary institution need to familiarize themselves with the entry requirements of the institution and the program they plan to enter.

Completion of English Language Arts 30-1 or 30-2 requires the writing of a provincial diploma examination.

2011-2012 Senior High Curriculum Handbook for Parents: Catholic Version

ALberta Education: Learn More About The 20-Level English Language Arts Courses

English Language Arts 10 Course Outline

1. Course Philosophy
The Alberta English Language Arts Program emphasizes lifelong applications of Language Arts skills. Language use reflects the inter-relatedness of the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and representing. Language is used to communicate understandings, ideas and feelings, to assist social and personal development, and to mediate thought processes. Language expansion occurs primarily through active involvement in language situations. Through writing the student can learn to clarify thought, emotion, and experience, and to share ideas, emotion and experiences with others. Literature is an integrated part of language learning.

In St. Jerome’s Catholic School, the students are invited to look further and develop a more coherent understanding of what language means as both a Christian event and a human event. Facility with language provides us with the ability to express ourselves and our faith in words, and to communicate, listen, and enter into dialogue and true relationships with others. Higher-level thinking skills of inquiring, reasoning and reporting are recognized as particular gifts from God, bringing with them special responsibilities to use such talents for the good of the community.

2. General Outcomes/Themes:
The study of English language arts enables each student to understand and appreciate the significance and artistry of literature. As well, it enables each student to understand and appreciate language and to use it confidently and competently for a variety of purposes, with a variety of audiences and in a variety of situations for communication, personal satisfaction, and learning.

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to

  • explore thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences.
  • comprehend literature and other texts in oral, print, visual and multimedia forms, and respond personally, critically and creatively.
  • manage ideas and information.
  • create oral, print, visual and multimedia texts, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication.
  • respect, support and collaborate with others.

The learning outcomes are interrelated and interdependent; each is to be achieved through a variety of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and representing experiences. Senior high school students engage all six language arts as they study texts and as they create their own texts in relevant situations for a variety of purposes and audiences. The classroom community, available resources, peer assistance, cooperation, individual motivation and teacher leadership will all assist growth. The application of computer technology in the writing process is essential for success.

Themes:
Decisions–Action or Apathy
The Human Condition–In Search of Self
World Perspectives–The Social Experience
Equality–Pain and Pride
Environment and Technology–Reality and Responsibility

3. Assessment
Assessment in all classes will occur on a regular basis. Assessment strategies fit into two broad categories: Assessment FOR Learning(during), and Assessment OF learning(after).

Assessment FOR Learning occurs during instruction and looks like discussion, peer review, student meetings, sharing questions and answers, revision, rewriting, personal reflection. Example assessments during learning: “Start an Online Discussion,” “Hamlet IV,iv Discussion,” “Honour and Certainty,” “Pillars of Character,” “Group Novel Study,” “Story Study Guide.”

Assessment OF Learning occurs midway through or at the end or a unit of instruction and looks like high stakes tests, midterm and final exams, end of unit tests, portfolios. Example assessments after learning: “Applying for a Summer Job,” “Choices Essay,” “Portfolio 10,” “Hamlet: Final Response,” “ELA 30 Final Exam.”

Marks taken during assessments and evaluations will contribute toward the final grade. Each unit of study uses various types of evaluation such as exams, assignments, collaborations, presentations. The weighting of each mark contributes to the unit total while the weighting of each unit contributes to the overall course grade. Late assignments will not be accepted after the end of unit due dates. Refer to student handbook for appeals procedures.

Approximate Gradebook Category Weighting
Personal/Creative ~ 30%

  • short stories, scripts, narratives, poems, book reviews, book talk, forum posts, online class discussion, blog comments, reading logs, any other personal/creative response to a text

Critical/Analytical ~ 40%

  • essays, letters, speeches, debates, reports, character sketches, any other critical or analytical response to a text

Representing ~ 5%

  • posters, photo essay, images, videos, animations, tag clouds, podcasts, surveys, mobiles, dioramas, collages, and any other assorted “blog bling”

Final Exam ~ 25%

4. Course Work and Evaluation

Unit 1 ~ 37.5% Determined from marks collected from course beginning to 1st report card cut-off

Unit 2 ~ 37.5% Determined from marks collected from 1st report card cut-off to final exam.

School Final Exam ~ 25% (Date TBA)

5. Primary Resources
Students will receive only one copy of each text according to the rental agreement. Additional/replacement texts may be purchased through the school office.
Reading List

6. ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 versus ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2
The ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 course sequence provides an opportunity to study texts with an increased emphasis on critical analysis. Texts studied are often “literary” in nature and relate to cultural and societal issues. These courses are designed for students who aspire to careers that require a broader application of skill to a generalized level.

The ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2 course sequence provides for the study of texts at a variety of levels of sophistication to meet the needs of students who are more diverse in terms of aspirations and abilities. Texts studied often have specific applications to careers or daily living. The courses focus on developing effective communication strategies and supporting students in enhancing their skills for text study and text creation.

Both ELA 30-1 and 30-2 serve as prerequisites for a senior high school diploma; however, not all post-secondary institutions accept ELA 30-2 for entry. In general, students who plan to attend a post-secondary institution need to familiarize themselves with the entry requirements of the institution and the program they plan to enter.

Completion of English Language Arts 30-1 or 30-2 requires the writing of a provincial diploma examination.

Senior High Curriculum at a Glance (pdf)

NRSV Religion 25 Final Exam 2008- Glutten Free

Would God enjoy a game of Bingo? Yahtzee? Battleship? Texas Hold’em? Would God enjoy the lottery?

Just a random (rhetorical) thought.

Anyway, determine which questions have been randomly assigned to you(open your Fortune Cookie). Do only the questions you’ve been assigned. If your Fortune Cookie has a “bonus”, your response to that question will be scored as a bonus as well. Your grade will not exceed 100%. Mwaahahaa.

Good luck. I mean it.

If you would rather answer all questions, go right ahead.

  1. What is a Rice Krispie Square for?
  2. Is there a single basic substance of which all Rice Krispie Squares are made?
  3. Do Rice Krispie Squares change?
  4. Do forces exist outside the Rice Krispie Square that determine its “Rice Krispie Square-ness”?
  5. Why do bad things happen to good Rice Krispie Squares?
  6. Can a Rice Krispie Square be evil?
  7. What is the role of a single Rice Krispie Square amongst a plate of Rice Krispie Squares?
  8. Are any two Rice Krispie Squares identical?
  9. How ought a Rice Krispie Square behave?
  10. Can a Rice Krispie Square not be a Rice Krispie Square?
  11. What is the relationship between a good recipe and a good Rice Krispie Square?
  12. What is the relationship between a good baker and a good recipe?
  13. What is the relationship between a good baker and a good Rice Krispie Square?
  14. By sensing only the Rice Krispie Square, what can be reasoned about the baker?
  15. What being first said, “This shall be a Rice Krispie Square!”?
  16. What do all future Rice Krispie Squares have in common with the “first Rice Krispie Square”?
  17. What do all bakers have in common with the first baker?
  18. What came first: the Rice Krispie Square, or the recipe, or the baker?
  19. Is there a single source of all Rice Krispie Squares?
  20. Can the same Rice Krispie Square be eaten twice?
  21. What Rice Krispie Square would be so good that you would give up being the King of Persia?
  22. What forces bind and separate Rice Krispie Squares?
  23. Could a Rice Krispie Square be made of stuff that was boundless?
  24. What four basic elements are in every Rice Krispie Square?
  25. If there were no more Rice Krispie Squares, would there still be a baker?
  26. Would the ultimate Rice Krispie Square-baker only choose one kind of Rice Krispie Square to bake, ever?
  27. Should the recipes for the best Rice Krispie Squares be kept secret? or sold to the highest bidder? or shared without conditions?
  28. Where do Rice Krispie Squares belong?
  29. If you met a sophist selling Rice Krispie Squares, would you buy one?
  30. How is a Rice Krispie Square like an atom?
  31. Would you know if you’ve eaten a Rice Krispie Square made from rarefied air?
  32. Who would bake better Rice Krispie Squares, Plato or Aristotle? Describe Plato’s Rice Krispie Square.
  33. If all good Rice Krispie Squares ever baked get eaten, would we still know what is a good Rice Krispie Square?
  34. Why would a baker still struggle to bake poor Rice Krispie Squares under conditions which make it impossible to bake good Rice Krispie Squares?
  35. Why do bakers bake Rice Krispie Squares in batches rather than one at a time?
  36. Is the intent of the baker relevant to what you do with a Rice Krispie Square?
  37. Why do bakers seem reluctant to come out of the kitchen and follow their Rice Krispie Squares to where they are eaten?
  38. Should you be able to tell the difference between a “homemade” Rice Krispie Square made with care, love, compassion, kindness, and a Rice Krispie Square made by an industrial machine?
  39. Do you remember the best Rice Krispie Square you ever ate? Should you?
  40. When will you taste again the best Rice Krispie Square you ever tasted?
  41. Can you tell the difference between a rich Rice Krispie Square and a poor Rice Krispie Square? Should there be poor Rice Krispie Squares?
  42. Are there Rice Krispie Squares anywhere else in the universe?
  43. How is it possible for two bakers in different places, who don’t know each other, to make similar Rice Krispie Squares?
  44. Should rain forests be destroyed to make room for more Rice Krispie Squares?
  45. Should there be more songs sung about Rice Krispie Squares?
  46. Should Rice Krispie Squares be afraid of Rice Krispie Square monsters?
  47. If you were deserted on an island, and found a Rice Krispie Square, what would you do with the Rice Krispie Square?
  48. When a baker finds that they have more Rice Krispie Squares than what fits the Rice Krispie Square jar, what should be done with the extra Rice Krispie Squares?
  49. You are an inmate in a prison. A sadistic guard wants your last Rice Krispie Square, if you don’t give it to him he will not only eat your Rice Krispie Square but some other innocent inmate’s Rice Krispie Square as well. You don’t have any doubt that he means what he says. What should you do?

Essay
What, if anything, do the Rice Krispie Squares we’ve shared this term have to do with philosophy? Consider any of the following or come up with your own reasons. Respond in the form of an essay. Inject your own humor, wit, personality, voice.

Fate put them here and it is their destiny to be eaten – Pre Socratics
They are a message from the Gods. – Hermes
They were bought and paid for. – Sophists
They are longing to return to the realm of the Rice Krispie Square. – Plato
They are from Delphi – Know Thy Rice Krispie Square!
They are created by a First Baker. – Aristotle
I don’t know. – Socrates
It’s better than Hemlock. – Socrates
The existence of appetite shows man’s place in society. – Plato
Rice Krispie Squares? What Rice Krispie Squares? These are mere shadows. – Plato
These Rice Krispie Squares will not eat themselves, they are nonliving. – Aristotle
Why do my Rice Krispie Squares have tiny holes in them and why are they a bit damp around the edges? – Sophie
The abundance of Rice Krispie Squares only demonstrates the appeal of a Golden Mean. – Aristotle
The abundance of Rice Krispie Squares demonstrates that the ideal is immutable. – Plato
The Rice Krispie Squares are here because the task was required for homework. – Sophie’s Teacher.
The Rice Krispie Squares are a portal to a parallel hyper-reality in which we are the ideas. – Alberto Knox
_______ __ ___ _______ _____.– read fortune in Rice Krispie Square

NRSV Religion 25 Final Exam 2008

Would God enjoy a game of Bingo? Yahtzee? Battleship? Texas Hold’em? Would God enjoy the lottery?

Just a random (rhetorical) thought.

Anyway, determine which questions have been randomly assigned to you(open your fortune cookie). Do only the questions you’ve been assigned. If your fortune cookie has a “bonus”, your response to that question will be scored as a bonus as well. Your grade will not exceed 100%. Mwaahahaa.

Good luck. I mean it.

If you would rather answer all questions, go right ahead.

  1. What is a cookie for?
  2. Is there a single basic substance of which all cookies are made?
  3. Do cookies change?
  4. Do forces exist outside the cookie that determine its “cookie-ness”?
  5. Why do bad things happen to good cookies?
  6. Can a cookie be evil?
  7. What is the role of a single cookie amongst a plate of cookies?
  8. Are any two cookies identical?
  9. How ought a cookie behave?
  10. Can a cookie not be a cookie?
  11. What is the relationship between a good recipe and a good cookie?
  12. What is the relationship between a good baker and a good recipe?
  13. What is the relationship between a good baker and a good cookie?
  14. By sensing only the cookie, what can be reasoned about the baker?
  15. What being first said, “This shall be a cookie!”?
  16. What do all future cookies have in common with the “first cookie”?
  17. What do all bakers have in common with the first baker?
  18. What came first: the cookie, or the recipe, or the baker?
  19. Is there a single source of all cookies?
  20. Can the same cookie be eaten twice?
  21. What cookie would be so good that you would give up being the King of Persia?
  22. What forces bind and separate cookies?
  23. Could a cookie be made of stuff that was boundless?
  24. What four basic elements are in every cookie?
  25. If there were no more cookies, would there still be a baker?
  26. Would the ultimate cookie-baker only choose one kind of cookie to bake, ever?
  27. Should the recipes for the best cookies be kept secret? or sold to the highest bidder? or shared without conditions?
  28. Where do cookies belong?
  29. If you met a sophist selling cookies, would you buy one?
  30. How is a cookie like an atom?
  31. Would you know if you’ve eaten a cookie made from rarefied air?
  32. Who would bake better cookies, Plato or Aristotle? Describe Plato’s cookie.
  33. If all good cookies ever baked get eaten, would we still know what is a good cookie?
  34. Why would a baker still struggle to bake poor cookies under conditions which make it impossible to bake good cookies?
  35. Why do bakers bake cookies in batches rather than one at a time?
  36. Is the intent of the baker relevant to what you do with a cookie?
  37. Why do bakers seem reluctant to come out of the kitchen and follow their cookies to where they are eaten?
  38. Should you be able to tell the difference between a “homemade” cookie made with care, love, compassion, kindness, and a cookie made by an industrial machine?
  39. Do you remember the best cookie you ever ate? Should you?
  40. When will you taste again the best cookie you ever tasted?
  41. Can you tell the difference between a rich cookie and a poor cookie? Should there be poor cookies?
  42. Are there cookies anywhere else in the universe?
  43. How is it possible for two bakers in different places, who don’t know each other, to make similar cookies?
  44. Should rain forests be destroyed to make room for more cookies?
  45. Should there be more songs sung about cookies?
  46. Should cookies be afraid of cookie monsters?
  47. If you were deserted on an island, and found a cookie, what would you do with the cookie?
  48. When a baker finds that they have more cookies than what fits the cookie jar, what should be done with the extra cookies?
  49. You are an inmate in a prison. A sadistic guard wants your last cookie, if you don’t give it to him he will not only eat your cookie but some other innocent inmate’s cookie as well. You don’t have any doubt that he means what he says. What should you do?

Essay
What, if anything, do the cookies we’ve shared this term have to do with philosophy? Consider any of the following or come up with your own reasons. Respond in the form of an essay. Inject your own humor, wit, personality, voice.

Fate put them here and it is their destiny to be eaten – Pre Socratics
They are a message from the Gods. – Hermes
They were bought and paid for. – Sophists
They are longing to return to the realm of the cookie. – Plato
They are from Delphi – Know Thy Cookie!
They are created by a First Baker. – Aristotle
I don’t know. – Socrates
It’s better than Hemlock. – Socrates
The existence of appetite shows man’s place in society. – Plato
Cookies? What cookies? These are mere shadows. – Plato
These cookies will not eat themselves, they are nonliving. – Aristotle
Why do my cookies have tiny holes in them and why are they a bit damp around the edges? – Sophie
The abundance of cookies only demonstrates the appeal of a Golden Mean. – Aristotle
The abundance of cookies demonstrates that the ideal is immutable. – Plato
The cookies are here because the task was required for homework. – Sophie’s Teacher.
The cookies are a portal to a parallel hyper-reality in which we are the ideas. – Alberto Knox
_______ __ ___ _______ _____.– read fortune in cookie

Portfolio 10: Now Focus on Me

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view, and represent to:

  1. Explore thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences
  2. Comprehend literature and other texts in oral, print, visual, and multimedia forms, and respond personally, critically, and creatively.
  3. Manage ideas and information
    • determine inquiry or research requirements
    • follow a plan of inquiry
  4. Create oral, print, visual, and multimedia texts, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication
  5. Respect, support, and collaborate with others

Specific Outcomes:

  1. Each student will write a final post as an introduction to all the portfolio pieces that directly or indirectly let the audience know what it is s/he values most about life.
  2. Students will internalize focus questions.
  3. Students will infuse ICT outcomes.
  4. Students will create a portfolio in response to course focus questions.
  5. Students will improve their “TIC” (Technique, Insight, Communication)
  6. Student writing skills will emphasize an increase in personal voice and a decrease in X=X errors

    Students will plan a portfolio that includes the following.

    1. One post about a novel’s exploration of a focus question
    2. One post about a short story’s exploration of a focus question
    3. One post about an excerpt from Shakespeare exploring a focus question
    4. One post prompted by viewing a film or TV episode with emphasis on voice and critical thinking about a focus question
    5. One post prompted by a music lyric with emphasis on voice and critical thinking about a focus question
    6. Now Focus on Me: a final post as an introduction to all the portfolio pieces that directly or indirectly let the audience know what it is s/he values most about life.

      Assessment/Evaluation:

      • 1 submission but all assignments must be included/linked

      Timeline:

      • May 30: final submission

      Rubric:

      • rubric.png

      Short Story Study

      Students will listen, speak, read, write, view, and represent to:

      1. Explore thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences
      2. Comprehend literature and other texts in oral, print, visual, and multimedia forms, and respond personally, critically, and creatively.
      3. Manage ideas and information
        • determine inquiry or research requirements
        • follow a plan of inquiry
      4. Create oral, print, visual, and multimedia texts, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication
      5. Respect, support, and collaborate with others

      Specific Outcomes:

      1. Students will produce a study guide in response to 3 stories.
      2. Students will internalize focus questions.
      3. Students will infuse ICT outcomes.
      4. Students will write 3 creative/personal responses
      5. Students will write a 5 Paragraph Critical Response Essay Exam in response to a teacher selected focus question.
      6. Students will improve their “TIC” (Technique, Insight, Communication)
      7. Student writing skills will emphasize an increase in personal voice and a decrease in X=X errors

      Learning Activities and Strategies:

      • Group A: ___,___,___,___
      • Group B: ___,___,___,___
      • Group C: ___,___,___,___
      • Group D: ___,___,___,___
      • Group E: ___,___,___,___
      • Group F: ___,___,___,___

      Students will plan a reading/response strategy.

      • consider focus questions
      • map out a response/reading plan to produce 3 creative/personal responses
      • must be approved by a group leader and teacher.
      • consider features in the texts/blogs for response ideas

      Resources and Materials:

      Assessment/Evaluation:

      • 33% 3 Study Guides – 40 points each
      • 33% 3 Creative/personal response submissions
      • 34% Exam (1 critical response essay)

      Timeline 10-A:

      • April 15: first creative/personal response submission
      • April 21: second creative/personal response submission
      • April ___: final creative/personal response submission
      • April ___: critical response essay exam

      Timeline 10-B:

      • April 15: first creative/personal response submission
      • April 21: creative/personal response second submission
      • May 4: creative/personal response final submission
      • May ___: critical response essay exam

      Notes:

      • smaller groups should yield an increase in on-time/on-task behaviours
      • peer support should emphasize development of voice in error-free writing

      Rubric:

      Novel Study

      Students will listen, speak, read, write, view, and represent to: 

      1. Explore thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences
      2. Comprehend literature and other texts in oral, print, visual, and multimedia forms, and respond personally, critically, and creatively.
      3. Manage ideas and information
        • determine inquiry or research requirements
        • follow a plan of inquiry
      4.  Create oral, print, visual, and multimedia texts, and enhance the clarity and artistry of communication 
      5.  Respect, support, and collaborate with others

      Specific Outcomes:

      1. Students will produce a body of evidence in response to 2 novels.(see Random Idea Generator)
      2. Students will internalize focus questions.
      3. Students will infuse ICT outcomes.
      4. Students will produce one “Outside the Box” response.
      5. Students will write a 5 Paragraph Argumentative Essay Exam in response to a teacher selected focus question.
      6. Students will improve their “TIC” (Technique, Insight, Communication)

      Learning Activities and Strategies: 

      • Group A: JP, BC, AP, JB, BG
      • Group B: JC, CA, MM, CM, APr
      • Group C: AN, JPo, MP, TS, SdJ
      • Group D: NC, KW, CS, JM, SG
      • Group E: DL, BR, OH, KY

      Students will plan a reading/response strategy. 

      • select 2 texts
      • select focus questions
      • map out a response/reading plan to produce a body of evidence
      • determine their “Outside the Box” activity. 
      • must be approved by a group leader and teacher.

      Resources and Materials:

      • Of Mice and Men
      • Why Shoot the Teacher
      • The Education of Little Tree
      • Never Cry Wolf
      • Something Wicked This Way Comes
      • Lord of the Flies
      • The Chrysalids 

      Assessment/Evaluation:

      • 25% Group Process
      • 25% Body of Evidence
      • 25% “Outside the Box”
      • 25% Exam

      Timeline:

      • 3 weeks

      Rubric:

      • rubric.png 

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