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Quiz up to Socrates

Short Answer(answer in as few words as possible):

  1. What was written in the first letter?
  2. Two clues link Hilde and Sophie. Which clue is the more mysterious? 
  3. Recall the analogy of the magic trick. What do the rabbit fur, the insects, and the magician symbolize?
  4. Why was the offering the most significant religious ceremony in Norse time?
  5. What did Thrym steal from Thor?
  6. What does Thales say all things are made of?
  7. Name the three philosophers from Miletus.
  8. Name the philosopher associated with the term “boundless”?
  9. What is the source of all things according to Anaximenes?
  10. Where did Parmenides think stuff comes from?
  11. Who first stated that fire was “rarefied air”?
  12. Thales and Anaximenes came to the same conclusion about substance, what?
  13. What is rationalism and who first suggested it?
  14. Who believed that you cannot step into the same river twice?
  15. How does Heraclitus explain God as a duality?
  16. What are the two major differences between Parmenides and Heraclitus?
  17. According to Empedocles, what are the four elements?
  18. According to Empedocles, what binds and separates things?
  19. Who first suggests that nature is built up of an infinite number of minute particles?
  20. Who beleived “something of everything was in everything”?
  21. How did Anaxagoruas describe the sun?
  22. What did Democritus believe bound atoms together?
  23. The word “a-tom” means “__-_________.”
  24. According to Democritus, what is a materialist?
  25. Who first said, “I would rather discover a new cause of nature than be the king of Persia”?
  26. What is fatalism?
  27. What character from a famous Greek tragedy was a slave to fate?
  28. What is the translation of the sign at Delphi?
  29. Who founded Greek medicine?
  30. What is the origin of the word “influenza”?

More Short Answer (or multiple choice or T/F):
Chapter 1, The Garden of Eden

  1. How old is Sophie when the novel opens?
  2. What is Albert Knag’s occupation?
  3. Where does Sophie live?
  4. What does the note say inside Sophie’s first envelope?
  5. What does Joanna say human beings are like?
  6. What question does Sophie ask herself as she looks in the mirror after she reads her first note?
  7. What does the note say inside Sophie’s second envelope?
  8. What do the envelopes have in common?
  9. What does Sophie call her secret spot?
  10. What does Sophie’s dad do for a living?
  11. How often does Sophie see her father?
  12. What does Sophie find in the regular mail as the story opens?

Chapter 2: The Top Hat

  1. How does Sophie surprise Joanna after they finish classes?
  2. Who is the only other being Sophie takes to her den with her?
  3. What does the introductory letter to Philosophy say?
  4. What do philosophers keep that babies have and adults lose?
  5. According to the top hat metaphor, what are philosophers?
  6. How does Sophie feel toward drug use?

Chapter 3: The Myths

  1. Ancient people used myths to explain what?
  2. What tool does the God Thor use?
  3. Why is Thor a powerful God?
  4. How does Thor dress to fool the giants?
  5. What is the Greeks’ criticism of Nordic Gods?
  6. What comprises Sophie’s myth?

Chapter 4, the Natural Philosophers

  1. What does Sophie’s mother think of the letters she receives?
  2. What does Anaximenes believe that everything comes from?
  3. What does Parmenides believe?
  4. How does Empedocles try to organize the world?
  5. What does Empedocles believe plays a role in bringing things together?
  6. According to Anaxagoras, what are seeds?

Chapter 5, Democritus and Chapter 6, Fate

  1. When do white envelopes arrive for Sophie?
  2. What does Empedocles believe plays a role in bringing things together?
  3. What do the big brown envelopes that arrive for Sophie contain?
  4. What does Empedocles believe plays a role in bringing things together?
  5. What does Sophie build with Legos?
  6. What does Empedocles believe plays a role in bringing things together?
  7. When Sophie’s mother sees her playing with Legos, what does Sophie tell her mother?
  8. What does Empedocles believe plays a role in bringing things together?
  9. After Sophie first tries to find her philosopher, how does Sophie’s philosopher avoid her seeing him?
  10. What does Empedocles believe plays a role in bringing things together?
  11. What does Sophie find in her room with the name “Hilde” written on it?
  12. What does Empedocles believe plays a role in bringing things together?

Longer Answers:

  1. Sophie receives mail addressed to Hilde. Is she silly or foolish for opening this mail? Why?
  2. Why does Sophie continue to do this homework, even though it is not required of her?
  3. Sophie immediately thinks about the first question, “Who are you?” How does this indirectly characterize her?
  4. What is Sophie’s den symbolic of? How?
  5. Why would Sophie not go with Joanna after classes?
  6. Is Sophie’s mother’s reaction to her daughter’s studies and new attitude realistic? Why?
  7. Why would ancient people make up such elaborate stories to explain how their world works?
  8. Why is it important that Sophie designed her own myth?
  9. What would be an example of Parmenides’ beliefs in Sophie’s life?
  10. What kind of teacher is Alberto? Why?
  11. What did Sophie learn from working with Legos in connection to Democritus?
  12. Do people today, as the Greeks did, believe in fate or predestination? What are examples?

Essay Questions:

Choose one of the following topics to develop into an essay.

  1. What ideas have you always wondered about that philosophy might explore. Be specific. For instance, Sophie wonders if something has always existed. Do you every think about why some people are tall and others short? Why some people go to jail and others don’t?
  2. Have you explored philosophy in your life without knowing that you actually were? Do you wonder about your existence often?
  3. Do you have any philosophical questions like Sophie? What are they? Do you think you’ll ever find the answers? Why or why not?
  4. Can anyone be a philosopher? What qualities does a philosopher need?
  5. Why does man have a need to figure out how the world is organized and how it came into being? Is this why Sophie continues with her coursework?
  6. Which philosopher stands out to you? Why?
  7. Choose one philosopher and explain how your chosen philosopher’s beliefs are still prevalent today.

Characters in Action

These questions are intended to help you perceive characters imaginatively – to help uncover the mysteries of motivation, personality, and interaction.

Understanding the Central Person

  1. What seems to drive this person to action?
  2. What action tells us most about this person?
  3. What action affects your feelings about this person?
  4. What are some basic character traits of this person?
  5. What is the greatest weakness of this person?
  6. How does this person relate to other people?
  7. What is special or important about this person’s moral or religious life?
  8. How does this person change or mature?
  9. What personal insights enlighten this person?

Exploring the World of Characters

  1. What other characters draw your special attention?
  2. What do they tell us about the central figure?
  3. What special relationships are formed by these less central people?
  4. What groups of people are associated in your mind?
  5. Do some of these people or groups represent values or ideas beyond themselves?
  6. Which characters provoke distaste or disdain?
  7. Which character is most mysterious and hard to understand?
  8. Which character could most easily be left out of this world?
  9. Do any of these other people seem to grow, change, or gain new self-understanding?
  10. Does any character you don’t know well play an important role?

Imagining Characters in Our World

  1. What in our world would shock the central character most?
  2. What would make anyone know this character didn’t fit in our world?
  3. What serious matters could you talk about with this person?
  4. What important values would you disagree on?
  5. What would your parents think about this character?
  6. What social causes would this person support?
  7. What television programs would be most appealing to this character?
  8. What would be the political affiliation, if any, of this person?
  9. What religious dogma would be most appealing or disgusting to this character?

Principal Images of Innocence and Experience

Innocence Experience
Divine Images Good parents False father and wicked stepmother
Wise old people Kings
Fairy godmothers Goddess of courtly love
Sky Images Music of the spheres King’s blazing crown
Fiery sword Lover’s flashing eyes
Moon
Fairies and spirits
Human Images One flesh of marriage The body politic
The shepherd Gardener and farmer
Animal Images Sheep Ape
Faithful hound Hawks, falcons
Domestic animals Swans and peacocks
Dove Lion
Unicorns and dolphins
Vegetable Images Pastoral settings Formal gardens
Eden Farm
Magician’s wand Royal scepter
Blossom Banner
Water Images Spring rain The opposing sea
Dew River
Fountains
Pools
Mineral Images Paths Courtyards
Cottages Capital city
Enchanted castle The highway

Principal Images of Heaven and Hell

Heavenly Demonic
Divine Images The society of gods Malicious gods
Sky father Blind fate
Sky mother
Sky Images Sun Fire and brimstone
Angels Darkness
Zeus’ Thunder
Promethean fire
Pentacostal fire
Human Images Members of one body Mob
Good shepherd Siren
King Tyrant
Animal Images Flock Monsters
Lamb of God Beasts of prey
Dove Serpent
Vegetable Images Garden Weeds
Tree of life The stake
Ambrosia Forbidden fruit
Manna
Bread and wine
Water Images Water of life Deluge
Baptism Whirlpools
Mineral Images Temple Wasteland
Straight path Labrynth
Mountaintop Babel
Gold Iron

Study Guide: Short Story

  1. Helpful Information (4 points)
    • Synthesize author information to help understand aspects of the story.
    • Explain important allusions
    • Link to other resources/critics/comments
  2. Unfamiliar Words (2 points)
    • Give references and contextual clues.
    • Link to online sources.
  3. Plot Summary(2 points)
  4. Theme (6 points)
  5. Main Fiction Elements (6 points)
  6. Personal Evaluation (6 points)
    • Offer a focused personal response to the story.
    • Mention merits and weaknesses.
    • Consider whether the story fulfilled its purpose as well as your own criteria for good stories.
    • Compare/contrast this story with other stories or other media with similar themes.
    • Need a response to story idea?
  7. Answer Critical Questions (4 points)
  8. “Quotable Quotes” (4 points)
    • Provide a list of key quotations.
  9. Publish Study Guide (6 points)
    • Attend to details that enhance the document.
    • Master key functions of productivity software.
  10. Attachments (Extra Credit)
    • Creative Response. Include a creative response (RAFTS, sequel, dramatization, interview, scene, sketch, etc.).
    • Any handouts, quizzes, media, electronic material, etc.

Samples:
ELA 9: A Sunrise on the Veld
ELA 9: Coffee, Snacks, Worms

Computer Option 9 Course Outline

PHILOSOPHY AND RATIONALE
Computer Option 9 significantly overlaps the provincially developed Information Processing strand of Career and Technology Studies (CTS). Philosophy, rationale. general outcomes, and assessment instruments(rubrics) are derived from the provincially developed course with variations in delivery, instructional time, and level of difficulty to meet the needs of Grade 9 students.

The 5 periods per cycle of scheduled instructional time for this course includes additional instructional time for Language Arts 9.

GENERAL OUTCOMES
Within an applied context relevant to personal goals, aptitudes and abilities; the student in Computer Option 9 will:

  • demonstrate the basic knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for achievement and fulfillment in personal life
  • use technology effectively to link and apply appropriate tools, management and processes to produce a desired outcome
  • develop basic competencies by:
  • managing learning
  • managing resources
  • communicating effectively
  • working with others
  • demonstrating responsibility

SPECIFIC OUTCOMES
INF1020 Keyboarding 1
Detailed Outcomes
50% 3 ALL KEYS Tests scored over 20 wpm. Tests must be passed consecutively within the same five day period.
40% Exercises, drills, timings.
10% Workstation Routines

INF2030 Keyboarding 2
Detailed Outcomes
50% 6 ALL KEYS Tests scored over 30 wpm. Tests must be passed consecutively within the same five day period.
40% Exercises, drills, timings.
10% Workstation Routines

INF1030 Word Processing 1
Detailed Outcomes
10% Planning
50% Final Project: A portfolio
30% Technical Skills
10% Workstation Routines

INF1040 Graphic Tools
Detailed Outcomes
10% Planning
50% Final Project: A portfolio
30% Technical Skills
10% Workstation Routines

INF1060 Spreadsheet 1
Detailed Outcomes
45% Technical Skills: Creation
45% Technical Skills: Manipulation
10% Workstation Routines

INF1070 HyperMedia Tools
Detailed Outcomes
10% Storyboard
50% Final Project
30% Technical Skills
10% Workstation Routines

INF2200 Information Highway 2
Detailed Outcomes
70% Design Skills and Editing; text, graphics, style; accuracy, grammar, quality
20% Planning: research, preparation, basic functions
10% Workstation Routines

ASSESSMENT
Each module will be assessed with cumulative averaging. Final grades will be assigned to completed modules only. Assessment weightings/rubrics are derived from the provincially developed courses. Prompts for writing assignments are derived from the concurrent delivery of Language Arts 9.

Information Processing General Outcomes

PHILOSOPHY AND RATIONALE
Information Processing 10 significantly overlaps the provincially developed Information Processing strand of Career and Technology Studies (CTS). Philosophy, rationale. general outcomes, and assessment instruments(rubrics) are derived from the provincially developed course with variations in delivery, instructional time, and level of difficulty to meet the needs of Grade 10 students.

GENERAL OUTCOMES
Within an applied context relevant to personal goals, aptitudes and abilities; the student in Information Processing 10 will:

  • demonstrate the basic knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for achievement and fulfillment in personal life
  • use technology effectively to link and apply appropriate tools, management and processes to produce a desired outcome
  • develop basic competencies by:
  • managing learning
  • managing resources
  • communicating effectively
  • working with others
  • demonstrating responsibility

SPECIFIC OUTCOMES
INF1020 Keyboarding 1
Detailed Outcomes
50% 3 ALL KEYS Tests scored over 20 wpm. Tests must be passed consecutively within the same five day period.
40% Exercises, drills, timings.
10% Workstation Routines

INF2030 Keyboarding 2
Detailed Outcomes
50% 6 ALL KEYS Tests scored over 30 wpm. Tests must be passed consecutively within the same five day period.
40% Exercises, drills, timings.
10% Workstation Routines

INF1030 Word Processing 1
Detailed Outcomes
10% Planning
50% Final Project: A portfolio
30% Technical Skills
10% Workstation Routines

INF1040 Graphic Tools
Detailed Outcomes
10% Planning
50% Final Project: A portfolio
30% Technical Skills
10% Workstation Routines

INF1060 Spreadsheet 1
Detailed Outcomes
45% Technical Skills: Creation
45% Technical Skills: Manipulation
10% Workstation Routines

INF1070 HyperMedia Tools
Detailed Outcomes
10% Storyboard
50% Final Project
30% Technical Skills
10% Workstation Routines

INF2200 Information Highway 2
Detailed Outcomes
70% Design Skills and Editing; text, graphics, style; accuracy, grammar, quality
20% Planning: research, preparation, basic functions
10% Workstation Routines

ASSESSMENT
Each module is a one credit course and will be assessed with cumulative averaging. Final grades will be assigned to completed modules only. Assessment weightings/rubrics are derived from the provincially developed courses.