Tag Archives: verbs

Hamlet: Final Response

Choose a focus for your final response to Hamlet.

Synthesize alternative points of view, (include links to sources: your posts, STJ blogs, etc.).

Review your responses throughout our study:

Writing tips:

Trackback.

PS: “To thine own rubric be true.”
rubric.png

November 9th is the “cut off” day for submission of my marks to the office.
Any assignment to be (re)submitted for grading must be “in my hand” before 2:00PM November 9th.

Hamlet Getting Started 2

Recall:

“refer to your responses to these questions and keep track of any changes in your opinions, or any surprises you find.”

Revisit your initial response to Hamlet: Getting Started. Include specific examples from the text to justify opinions you are forming; develop, rebuke, or refute your initial impressions. Synthesize ideas from outside the text to enhance the clarity of your argument. Use stronger verbs in topic sentences. Use transitions to move between ideas and examples, and avoid dropped quotes and the now overused blockquote.

Trackback. Thanks.

Outcome-Illustrating Verbs

AKA Strong Verbs

  1. Knowledge of terminology; specific facts; ways and means of dealing with specifics (conventions, trends and sequences, classifications and categories, criteria, methodology); universals and abstractions in a field (principles and generalizations, theories and structures): Knowledge is (here) defined as the remembering (recalling) of appropriate, previously learned information: Arrange; defines; describes; duplicate; enumerates; identifies; labels; lists; matches; names; order; reads; recall; recognize; records; relate; repeat; reproduces; selects; states; views.
  2. Comprehension: Grasping (understanding) the meaning of informational materials. Classifies; cites; converts; describes; discusses; estimates; explains; generalizes; gives examples; makes sense out of; paraphrases; report; restates (in own words); select; summarizes; traces; translate; understands.
  3. Application: The use of previously learned information in new and concrete situations to solve problems that have single or best answers. Acts; administers; apply; articulates; assesses; charts; choose; collects; computes; constructs; contributes; controls; demonstrate; determines; develops; discovers; dramatize; employ; establishes; extends; implements; includes; informs; interpret; instructs; operate; participates; practice; predicts; prepares; preserves; produces; projects; provides; relates; reports; schedule; shows; sketch; solves; teaches; transfers; uses; utilizes.
  4. Analysis: The breaking down of informational materials into their component parts, examining (and trying to understand the organizational structure of) such information to develop divergent conclusions by identifying motives or causes, making inferences, and/or finding evidence to support generalizations. Analyze; appraise; breaks down; calculate; categorize; correlates; diagrams; differentiates; discriminates; distinguishes; examine; focuses; illustrates; infers; limits; questions; outlines; points out; prioritizes; recognizes; separates; subdivides; tests.
  5. Synthesis: Creatively or divergently applying prior knowledge and skills to produce a new or original whole. Adapts; anticipates; assembles; categorizes; collaborates; collects; combines; communicates; compares; compiles; composes; contrasts; creates; designs; develops; devises; expresses; facilitates; formulates; generates; incorporates; individualizes; initiates; integrates; intervenes; manages; models; modifies; negotiates; organizes; plans; prepares; progresses; rearranges; reconstructs; reinforces; reorganizes; revises; structures; substitutes; validates.
  6. Evaluation: Judging the value of material based on personal values/opinions, resulting in an end product, with a given purpose, without real right or wrong answers. Appraises; argue; assess; attach; choose; compares & contrasts; concludes; core; criticizes; critiques; decides; defends; evaluate; interprets; judges; justifies; predicts; rate; reframes; supports; value.
  1. Adapted from: Bloom, B.S. Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: The Classification of Educational Goals: Handbook 1, Cognitive Domain. (New York; Toronto: Longmans, Green, 1956).

Hamlet: Act 1 and 2(English 30)

How do isolation and loneliness affect how we perceive ourselves?

Is Horatio a nihilist? A Christian existentialist? Something else? Does he reveal his “imperatives“? How does he respond when evidence challenges his “imperatives”?

Consider “Postulates 1-4.”

How do characters respond when evidence clearly contradicts their ideals?

While viewing/reading/blogging, keep the usual “Cornell” notes with pen and paper. Blog your response to textual issues arising from class discussion. Link your blog to online sources: wikis, etexts, guides, discussions, imdbs. Synthesize don’t plagiarize: hyperlink all sources. Refer to “Improve Your Critical Thinking” suggestions.

Refresh your skills by looking again at notes from our discussion on Bloom: Knowledge=>Comprehension==>Application==>
Analysis==>Synthesis==>Evaluation.

Ask for the “Strong Verbs” handout if you’ve misplaced yours.

PS: linguistic multi-taskers will excel.

Personal Universe Lexicon

To construct your Personal Universe Lexicon, start with a new post. You may wish to construct the list with pen and paper first and transfer it to your blog later. Begin by following these instructions:

Write down as many words as you can then sort the words into the categories outlined below. Complete each category. Write as quickly as you can.

Categories:

  • 16 words of each of the five senses (16 x 5 = 80 words). The words must mean, suggest: taste touch, sight, smell, and hearing. For instance, desiccated or frozen might suggest touch to you, or birdsong hearing.
  • 10 words of motion. The words must mean, suggest motion to you. They do not necessarily need to be verbs. Baby could be a motion word for someone, for example.
  • 3 abstractions. Such as love or freedom or truth.
  • 7 anything else. Any word with meaning to you that does not fit into the other categories.

All the words on the list must

  1. have significance to/for you
  2. be specific; that is the word must not be “bird” but “robin,” not “tree” but “aspen.”
  3. sound good to the ear.

Use no adverbs. Use no plurals.

Keep track of the words with your blog. Move them around each other in the list every day for a week. Choose one word at random from the list; write what the word(s) sparks, what the juxtaposition of words builds for you.

Trackback/pinkback your list to this post.