I believe in God,
the Father almighty,
Creator of heaven and earth,
and in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord,
who was conceived by the Holy Spirit,
born of the Virgin Mary,
suffered under Pontius Pilate,
was crucified, died and was buried;
he descended into hell;
on the third day He rose again from the dead;
he ascended into heaven,
and is seated at the right hand of God the Father Almighty;
from there he will come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit,
the holy catholic Church,
the communion of Saints,
the forgiveness of sins,
the resurrection of the body,
and life everlasting. Amen.

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I believe in one God,
the Father almighty,
maker of heaven and earth,
of all things visible and invisible.

I believe in one Lord Jesus Christ,
the Only Begotten Son of God,
born of the Father before all ages.
God from God, Light from Light,
true God from true God,
begotten, not made, consubstantial with the Father;
through him all things were made.
For us men and for our salvation
he came down from heaven,
and by the Holy Spirit was incarnate of the Virgin Mary,
and became man.

For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate,
he suffered death and was buried,
and rose again on the third day
in accordance with the Scriptures.

He ascended into heaven
and is seated at the right hand of the Father.
He will come again in glory
to judge the living and the dead
and his kingdom will have no end.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life,
who proceeds from the Father and the Son,
who with the Father and the Son is adored and glorified,
who has spoken through the prophets.

I believe in one, holy, catholic and apostolic Church.
I confess one baptism for the forgiveness of sins
and I look forward to the resurrection of the dead
and the life of the world to come. Amen.

Questions:

How can one God be three “persons” – Father, Son, and Holy Spirit?

How can Jesus be both God and human?

What is God’s kingdom like?

Think of one club, team or organization to which you presently belong. What is the purpose of this group? What is one requirement or belief of the group that helps all its members work toward a common goal?

Read Isaiah 49:15-16. What is the prophet attempting to tell us about God?

Read CCC #239. What does the Church say about God in this passage?

Read John 13:3-17. What does this passage tell us about Jesus and therefore about God?

When do you most feel the presence of Jesus in your life?

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“Make big things from small beginnings.”

First Read Titus.

The letter from Paul to Titus is very short and was written (around 66 AD) to a Church leader who did not become very famous. And yet a passage from this letter (Titus 2:11-14) is used every year at Christmas midnight Mass. Four little verses that are read at Mass begin with, “Beloved: The grace of God has appeared, saving all and training us to reject godless ways and worldly desires” (The Lectionary, p. 106).

The Christmas story itself has other examples of God making big things from small beginnings. Mary is just a young girl – a teenager – and she becomes the mother of God. Bethlehem is a tiny town, not very well known for anything, and it becomes the birthplace of our Messiah.

God is very good at making surprising things happen from humble beginnings. So don’t ever doubt the importance of whatever you do for God. Even if you think it is small, God can make very big things come from it.

Second, take note of specific passages that Paul offers as advice to Titus.

Consider these themes:
1. What makes a worthy church leader? (Titus 1:5-9)
2. What tips are offered for living the Christian life? (Titus 2:1-8)
3. How can people, in general, be good in every way? (Titus 3:1-11)

Finally, write your own letter to a trusted friend. Modernize it. Make it real, convincing, believable for the 21st century.

Consider these themes:
1. What advice could be offered to a teenager looking at their personal future as an adult citizen (or a leader) in Canadian society?
2. What advice could be offered to a teenager struggling with peer pressure and social media or struggling with the temptation of drugs and alcohol?
3. What advice could you offer a teenager who struggles with relating to adults in authority: teachers, parents, police, politicians, TAs, … referees?

Format your letter using the same business letter guidelines you have mastered in ELA 9. Use your own address and the address of a friend in class, (or invent a realistic looking address).

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Consider the following excerpt from Amoris Laetitia by Pope Francis:

Love rejoices with others
109. The expression chaírei epì te adikía[“rejoice over wrongdoing”] (1 Cor 13:6) has to do with a negativity lurking deep within a person’s heart. It is the toxic attitude of those who rejoice at seeing an injustice done to others. The following phrase expresses its opposite: sygchaírei te aletheía: “it rejoices in the right”. In other words, we rejoice at the good of others when we see their dignity and value their abilities and good works. This is impossible for those who must always be comparing and competing, even with their spouse, so that they secretly rejoice in their failures.

110. When a loving person can do good for others, or sees that others are happy, they themselves live happily and in this way give glory to God, for “God loves a cheerful giver” (2 Cor 9:7). Our Lord especially appreciates those who find joy in the happiness of others. If we fail to learn how to rejoice in the well-being of others, and focus primarily on our own needs, we condemn ourselves to a joyless existence, for, as Jesus said, “it is more blessed to give than to receive” (Acts 20:35). The family must always be a place where, when something good happens to one of its members, they know that others will be there to celebrate it with them.

  • What are some joys we have experienced in our family? Are there ways to build upon these joys to create a more joyful home?
  • In what ways could we add more joy to our family? Could we be more cheerful in giving and complain less? Could we focus less on our own needs and more on the happiness of a family member? Could we rejoice in our family’s love by affirming each other more with compliments? Could we smile more at our family members?
  • Do we base our lives on the joyful awareness that we are beloved sons and daughters of God, or do we let something rob us of the joy of the Gospel? What is it that robs us? Is it anxiety, fear, or impatience? How might prayer help with these things?
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In this Bishop Barron video, he lays out the argument about what is the “central logic of Christianity.”

Watch the video: pause, rewind, watch again, question, research, read scripture, note, start again, pause, note some more.

Write a post in your iblog in which you
• demonstrate an understanding of the main point(s),
• relates an idea(s) from the video to another text(s),
• offer your own arguments – agreeing or disagreeing with the points in the video – with supporting evidence.

Consider the rubric.

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Georges Lemaître.

Duncan Aikman of the New York Times spotlighted Lemaitre’s view in 1933: “‘There is no conflict between religion and science,’ Lemaïtre has been telling audiences over and over again in this country …. His view is interesting and important not because he is a Catholic priest, not because he is one of the leading mathematical physicists of our time, but because he is both.”

Read ‘A Day Without Yesterday’: Georges Lemaitre & the Big Bang by Mark Midbon.

Ready to write? Try this assignment: The Myth of Catholic Irrationality.

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Bishop Dowd of Montreal wrote the following while participating in the Synod of Bishops on Young People, Faith and Vocational Discernment in Rome in October 2018:

The 4 basic questions I believe constitute the corners and edges that anchor the puzzle. These questions are:

  • Who is God?
  • If God is good, why is there evil in he world?
  • If God is good but there is evil in the world, what has God done about it?
  • If God is good but there is evil in the world and God is doing something about it, how can we be part of it?

It is my conviction that these questions haunt the heart of every person, religious or not, and that the Christian faith can give a complete answer to those questions. God is love, the tragedy of sin, the drama and beauty of salvation history, and the call to vocation.

Also in his paper he mentions his support for Bishop Barron from California. Bishop Barron said the following in his “intervention” to Pope Francis:

What would a new apologetics look like? First, it would arise from the questions that young people spontaneously ask. It would not be imposed from above but would rather emerge organically from below, a response to the yearning of the mind and the heart. Here it would take a cue from the method of St. Thomas Aquinas. The austere texts of the great theological master in point of fact emerged from the lively give-and-take of the quaestiones disputatae that stood at the heart of the educational process in the medieval university. Thomas was deeply interested in what young people were really asking. So should we.

Have a closer look at Bishop Barron’s “A New Apologetics” and Bishop Dowd’s “Putting together the puzzle of faith.” What discussion points, ideas, or questions do you find agreeable?

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Source: CCCB

The Catholic Church for its part continues to underline the ethical problems involved with the recreational use and abuse of this drug: the negative risks that impact on psychological and physical health, the growing problems of a society more and more dependent on drugs and alcohol, the possibility of brain damage especially to those under the age of 25, the negative repercussions on families and local communities, and unfortunately the willingness of businesses and governments to exploit the drug for commercial interests and as a source of tax revenue, thereby even further jeopardizing the pursuit of the common good.

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Read about Howard Gardner’s eight “signs” of intelligence (and at wikipedia).

Consider the first seven intelligences for this activity:

  1. Spatial – picture smart
  2. Bodily-Kinesthetic – body smart
  3. Musical – music smart
  4. Linguistic – word smart
  5. Logical-mathematical – number smart
  6. Interpersonal – people smart
  7. Intrapersonal – self smart

Small Group Process:

Task 1: Form groups of 7, each member of the group studies a “set” or readings/questions. Each member then reports to the group: give a brief summary of the passage and share answers to the questions. If your group is short a member or two, divide the work fairly so all sets get done.

Task 2: The group members together complete the following task. Using the scripture passages below find:

  • 2 examples of the importance and/or value of musical intelligence
  • 3 people who are word smart
  • 2 people who use logical intelligence
  • 2 people whose understanding of Jesus is rooted in the intelligence of relationships
  • 1 person who is self smart
  • 3 passages that rely on spatial intelligence
  • 1 person who uses physical intelligence to understand Jesus.

Set A
Luke 10:38-42
What does Mary do?

John 11:5-6
What is Jesus’ attitude toward Mary, Martha and Lazarus?

John 11:20-22
What is Martha’s faith based on? Logic? A Convincing argument? Her relationship with Jesus.

Set B
Exodus 4:10-17
What is Aaron’s role?

Acts 8:26-38
Who are the two people in this story?
Why does one of them choose to be baptized?

Set C
2 Chronicles 5:11-14
What happens right before God’s presence fills the temple?

1 Samuel 16:23
Who calms Saul and how?

Set D
John 1:3-9
How is Jesus described in this passage?

Mark 13:24-27
How does Jesus speak about the second coming?

Ezekiel 1:4-28
Ezekial uses (music / logic / images / human relationships) to help understand God.

Set E
Exodus 18:13-27
What is Moses’ problem?
Who helps him solve it in a logical step by step way?

John 11:16
Who has a very matter-of-fact attitude?
What does he say?

John 20:24-29
Whose need for proof does Jesus understand and accept?

Set F
Luke 5:4-11
When does Peter first begin to understand Jesus?

Matthew 14:24-33
What does Peter do when he sees Jesus?

Matthew 17:1-8
What does Peter suggest in this passage?

John 13:3-10
What does Jesus do? how does Peter respond?
Based on these passages, which of the intelligences does Peter often use to understand and respond to Jesus?

Set G
Romans 7:14-23
Who does Paul talk about as he tries to explain law and grace?

1 Corinthians 2:1-5
What does Paul say helped reveal the power and the Spirit?

2 Corinthians 12:7-10
Paul understands that in his ________ the _____ that God has given him is visible.

Which of the intelligences is Paul using in these passages to help people understand God.

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