Archive for the ‘Cross Roads’ Category

Read Matthew 6:24-34.

In this Gospel reading, before Jesus tells his listeners not to worry, he says “No one can serve two masters.” Who is Jesus refering to? One master is God(Love), surely, but who is the other?

Could Jesus be refering to more specific “evils” – evils that cause us to worry and make us miserable?

What kinds of worry are normal? What kinds of worry lead to debilitating anxiety?

Consider the character Tony from Wm. Paul Young’s, “Cross Roads” – after reading Chapter 3. What “masters” does (or doesn’t) he serve? What other ideas come to mind?

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Matthew 6:24-34
View in: NRSV
24No man can serve two masters. For either he will hate the one, and love the other: or he will sustain the one, and despise the other. You cannot serve God and mammon.
25Therefore I say to you, be not solicitous for your life, what you shall eat, nor for your body, what you shall put on. Is not the life more than the meat: and the body more than the raiment?
26Behold the birds of the air, for they neither sow, nor do they reap, nor gather into barns: and your heavenly Father feedeth them. Are not you of much more value than they?
27And which of you by taking thought, can add to his stature by one cubit?
28And for raiment why are you solicitous? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they labour not, neither do they spin.
29But I say to you, that not even Solomon in all his glory was arrayed as one of these.
30And if the grass of the field, which is today, and tomorrow is cast into the oven, God doth so clothe: how much more you, O ye of little faith?
31Be not solicitous therefore, saying, What shall we eat: or what shall we drink, or wherewith shall we be clothed?
32For after all these things do the heathens seek. For your Father knoweth that you have need of all these things.
33Seek ye therefore first the kingdom of God, and his justice, and all these things shall be added unto you.
34Be not therefore solicitous for tomorrow; for the morrow will be solicitous for itself. Sufficient for the day is the evil thereof.
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