Archive for the ‘Religious Education (Catholic) 9’ Category

Theme 1: What is love?

Outcomes
Students will

  • examine and evaluate their understanding of love
  • analyze Scripture pas- sages where Christ models love
  • explore the Christian dimensions of love within the context of popular notions of love
  • analyze ways they love others because they love themselves
  • articulate what it means to be loved and to love unconditionally
  • listen prayerfully to the call to be loving

Key Concepts

  • We are called to love as Jesus loved.

    (Since we have been loved, we also must love – 1 John 4.10- 12.)

  • Love that is rooted in Christ will never fail, even when it seems to be the most foolish, unreasonable or diffi- cult choice.
  • Love is not just an emotion. Love is willed. Mature love is a call to action which fosters the good of others.
  • Giving and receiving love is the most important dimension of our lives, bringing out the best in both the lover and the beloved.
  • To truly love others, we must love our- selves.

Theme 2: What is the loving thing to do?

Outcomes
Students will

  • reviewandapplythe decision-making model (see, judge, act, evaluate)
  • demonstrate an understanding of the role of the magisteri- um, Scripture and tra- dition in moral deci- sion making
  • identify times when it may be difficult to do what is loving
  • define conscience and name its role in moral decision making
  • explain the relation- ship between Christian moral deci- sion making and love

Key Concepts

  • Christian moral deci- sion making is based on love.
  • People are bound by their conscience in determining the loving thing to do.
  • The magisterium, Scripture and tradition guide Catholics in moral decision making.
  • Doing the loving thing may mean doing what is difficult or unpopular.

Theme 3: Why wait?

Outcomes
Students will

  • explain how our sexuality can help us to love
  • identify acceptable Christian expressions of love
  • explain why having sex is not the loving thing to do outside of marriage
  • define chastity and understand why it is a Christian virtue
  • analyze sexual issues in relation to the virtue of chastity

Key Concepts

  • “All Christ’s faithful are called to lead a chaste life in keeping with their particular states of life” (CCC #2348).
  • “Chastity includes an apprenticeship in self- mastery which is a training in human freedom” (CCC #2339).
  • God created us as sexual beings. Our sexuality draws us out of our- selves to relate with others.
  • Genital sexual expression becomes personal and truly human when it is integrated into the relationship of one per- son to another, in the complete and lifelong mutual gift of a man and a woman. (see CCC #2337)
  • Sexual feelings are neither good nor bad in themselves; they sim- ply are.
  • There are many chaste ways of expressing our love for others.
  • The sixth commandment protects the sacred bonds of committed love.

Theme 4: How does love go wrong?

Outcomes
Students will

  • use 1 Corinthians 13.4-8a for identifying the signs of manipulative, coercive and abusive behaviour in relationships
  • value the basic dignity of every person within relationships
  • understand and demonstrate skills of appropriate assertive behaviour
  • use Scripture for developing Christian attitudes towards loving others

Key Concepts

  • “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God” (Matthew 5.9).
  • In Scripture we find direction and inspiration for healthy, lov- ing relationships. (e.g., 1 Corinthians 13.4-8a, Romans 13.10)
  • People in healthy relationships recognize the equal dignity and basic rights of all involved.
  • Love goes wrong when it becomes self- centred.
  • Not all relationships are healthy. Manipulation, coercion and abuse are signs of unhealthy relationships.
  • Assertiveness skills are necessary for developing and maintaining healthy relationships.
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Theme 1: What do I really believe?

Outcomes
Students will

  • articulate ways that relationships based on faith are reasonable
  • express what it means to have a relationship with God through Jesus
  • describe how faith in Jesus Christ challenges them to love and respect others

Key Concepts

  • “Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God is one Lord…” (Deuteronomy 6.4).
  • Jesus is the beginning and the end, the alpha and the omega.
  • Faith cannot be fully explained, but it is reasonable. Faith admits mystery.
  • Our moral life has its source in faith in God, who reveals his love to us. (CCC #2087) Faith in God’s love encom- passes the call and the obligation to respond with love and respect – the first and second command- ments call us to love and respect God above everything, and to respect all creatures for and because of God.
  • Being faithful means being open to develop- ing our relationship with God.

Theme 2: What’s the point of prayer?

Outcomes
Students will

  • define Christian prayer
  • locate in Scripture, describe and demonstrate five forms of prayer:
    • Adoration and Blessing
    • Petition
    • Intercession
    • Thanksgiving
    • Praise
  • express different ways that God responds to prayer
  • demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between human freedom, divine prerogative and prayer

Key Concepts

  • “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heav- en” (Matthew 5.3).
  • Prayer is our living relationship with God.
  • The third commandment calls us to stop and pray. The Sunday celebration of the Lord’s Day and his Eucharist is at the heart of the Church’s life.
  • Jesus teaches us how to pray.
  • God always answers our prayers.
  • God answers our prayers in ways that are not limited by our own perspectives. God’s view is infinitely bigger than our view.
  • In answering our prayers, God does not take away human free- dom.
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Theme 1: How do I look?

Outcomes
Students will

  • value the sacredness of the human body, regardless of appearance
  • identify ways that we can co-operate with God in car- ing for our bodies
  • express ways in which the Incarnation shows the sacredness of the human body
  • respect physical change as integral to God’s creation of us
  • understand the ways we use our bodies in prayer

Key Concepts

  • The Incarnation shows us the sacredness of the human body.
  • Jesus affirms the dignity of every person.
  • We are made in the image and likeness of God.
  • The fifth commandment underlines the sacredness of human life.
  • We are called to co-operate with God in the care of our bodies.
  • God’s creation of us does not end: we constantly change physically; we are called to respect that change in ourselves and others.

Theme 2: How do I know what I know?

Outcomes
Students will

  • identify their own preferred ways of learning
  • name a variety of ways of learning and of growing intellectually
  • respect the unique intellect of each person
  • consider how intellect shapes faith
  • realize God’s desire to be known through Jesus Christ

Key Concepts

  • Each person has a unique way of learning.
  • The fifth commandment underlines the value of all people, regardless of their abilities.
  • God desires all to come to know the truth – especially religious truth, which enables us to know and love God.
  • Searching, questioning and doubt may be avenues to intellectual growth.
  • We change intellectually throughout life; this is part of God’s plan.

Theme 3: Is it okay to feel this way?

Outcomes
Students will

  • identify emotions and their functions in their lives
  • demonstratehowfaith guides how we act in response to our emotions
  • respect the right of all people to experience their own feelings
  • understand that there are morally acceptable and morally unacceptable ways to express any emotion

Key Concepts

  • “Blessedarethosewho mourn, for they will be com- forted” (Matthew 5.4).
  • God created us to experience a wide range of emotions.
  • Everyhumanlife,fromthe moment of conception until death, is sacred because the human person has been willed for its own sake in the image and likeness of the living and holy God (CCC #2319). The way we express our emotions must respect the sacredness of all human life.
  • ThroughouremotionsGod calls us to decision and action.
  • Ouremotionsareagiftthat helps us to relate to others and to God.
  • Emotions are not “good” or “bad” in themselves. “Passions are morally good when they contribute to a good action, evil in the opposite case…. Emotions and feelings can be taken up into the virtues or perverted by the vices.” (CCC #1768)
  • Our faith guides our expression of emotions so that we, and those with whom we relate, become more loving.

Theme 4: How do I get along with others?

Outcomes
Students will

  • explain how they are social beings responsible for the care of one another in accordance with God’s plan
  • summarize stories where Jesus models how to live in and challenge society
  • interpret the model of table fellowship, as used by Jesus Christ, for their own lives
  • explain how the Christian concept of society is inclusive

Key Concepts

  • “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God” (Matthew 5.9).
  • God created us as social beings, called to love and serve one another.
  • Jesusmodelshowtolivein and challenge society.
  • The Christian concept of society is inclusive.
  • Faith shapes our criteria for healthy relationships.
  • Through table fellowship, Jesus changed the stan- dard for how people relate socially.
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Theme
Who do I want to be with?

Outcomes
Students will

  • explore and express the qualities of relationships they want to have
  • name how they want others to “be with them”
  • know that each person has been created with the freedom to shape his or her own relationships
  • repeat and explain the Beatitudes
  • identify ways that the Beatitudes help us understand the Christian attitude toward being with others
  • articulate the Christian call to take on the attitude of Christ

Key Concepts

  • We are created with the freedom to shape our own relationships and to determine what kind of persons we will be with others.
  • We are called to make God manifest by acting in conformity with our creation “in the image and likeness of God.” (CCC #2085)
  • Our relationship with Jesus calls us to be of the “same mind” with Jesus, looking out for the interests and well-being of others with compassion and love. (Philippians 2.1-11)
  • The Ten Commandments and the Beatitudes describe for us the paths that lead to the kingdom of heaven. The grace of the Holy Spirit helps us to travel these paths. (CCC #1724)
  • The Beatitudes outline a distinctly Christian attitude toward being with others

Key Terms

  • beatitude
  • The Beatitudes
  • virtues
  • kingdom of heaven
  • the Ten Commandments
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Inherit the WindOne of the climax scenes is when Henry Drummond calls Matthew Harrison Brady to the witness stand.  During this scene, Mr. Brady proclaims himself as an authority on the bible.  The following dialogue occurs.

Drummond:            “Do you believe that every word written in this book (holding a bible) should be.” taken literally?

Brady:            “Everything in the bible should be accepted exactly as given there.”

Based on what you have learned in class about reading scripture, would you agree with Mr. Brady’s statement, “Everything in the bible should be accepted exactly as given there.”  Explain your answer in two or three paragraphs.

The rubric that will be used to grade this assignment is located on the left side and is called Movie Study Assignment Rubric

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Use the links below to help you complete Part one of the assignment.

  1. Give five general facts about poverty in Canada.
  2. Describe four ways how children are affected by poverty in Canada.
  3. How does living in poverty affect students’ attitude and performance in school?
  4. What are two common misconceptions about poverty?
  5. List three things you could do to help alleviate poverty in Canada.

Canada without poverty

Free the Children

Wikipedia (Poverty in Canada)

Campaign 2000

Canada.com Report (Contains an articled entitled, Child poverty has lasting effects, study shows)

BC Teachers Federation (This will help you address question #3)

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Answer four of the following questions.   Your answers  must be five to ten or more sentences long.  Answer it in a word document, save it, and either print it off and hand in or e-mail it to me. Since this is an assignment and more effort is expected, it is worth much more than a reflection.  The rubric on the right titled, Movie Assignment Rubric, will be used to assess your response.

The Sermon on the Mount is all about Christian ethics. Christian ethics stresses the need for grace, compassion, and forgiveness because of human weakness.

Jimmy Johnston says: “Right here. Editorial says this fight is good as murder, and everybody associated with it should be hauled into court and prosecuted afterwards. They say the paper’s gettin’ all sorts of letters from people saying you’re their inspiration – like you saved their lives or somethin’. If you ask me, it’s a lotta crap… but if I’m gonna promote this fight, I’m not gettin’ hung out to dry if somethin’ happens to you”.

1)  As the quote illustrates, boxing is one of the most controversial of all sports. Is it morally wrong for men or women to use violence to earn money?  Is it morally (the distinction between right and wrong or holiness and unholiness) wrong to fight for money, or is boxing just a sport?

Reporter: Bob Johnson, Boston Globe. Two days ago, we ran a story about you giving your relief money back. Can you tell our readers why?

Jim Braddock: “I believe we live in a great country, a country that’s great enough to help a man financially when he’s in trouble. But lately, I’ve had some good fortune, and I’m back in the black. And I just thought I should return it.”

2)  What does Braddock’s response to the reporter say about his conscience (the inner sense of what is right or wrong or what is holy or unholy)?
3)  Braddock refused to use his poverty as an excuse to be dishonest or victimize others. Describe the scenes where he illustrated this?

4)  What issues do people today deal with that is similar to those of the Braddock family? How are today’s issues different? What sorts of new issues will children of the 21st century face?

5)  The scene where Braddock’s son explains why he stole is extremely powerful. Would you steal if your family hadn’t eaten in a week, or if your family’s ability to stay together depended on it? Explain why or why not?

6)  A theme in the movie is the struggle to do what is right or what is holy. Braddock teaches his son to make the correct decision about stealing. Braddock also makes a tough decision when he repays the government aid. Braddock clearly has a moral conscience. What would you do if when waiting for a teacher in his/her room, you see the upcoming test answers?  What does you answer say about your conscience (the inner sense of what is right or wrong or holiness)?

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Answer two of the following questions.  Your answers for both questions must be a minimum of five to ten or sentences.   Place your response in a word document, save it, and either print it off and hand in or e-mail it to me.  The rubric on the right titled, Reflection Rubric, will be used to evaluate your response.

The purpose of marriage is the mutual growth in holiness of the man and woman. From the movie, we see that Jimmy and Mae’s marriage was a true covenant (pledge) of love.

1)  Talk about some of the key scenes in the film that express the meaning of Jimmy and Mae’s marriage. What did their marriage mean to them in times of plenty and in times of want?

2)  How did Jimmy and Mae show their respect for one another? How did their covenant of love and respect grow over the duration of the film? What challenges did their covenant or pledge to one another have to meet so that the Braddock could stay a family?

3)  What were Jimmy and Mae’s beliefs about their family, their children? What did you think about the scene in which Jimmy has to take his son to return the salami he has stolen? What did the scene tell us about Jimmy’s moral character and his relationship with his son/children?

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