Theme 1: What do I really believe?

Outcomes
Students will

  • articulate ways that relationships based on faith are reasonable
  • express what it means to have a relationship with God through Jesus
  • describe how faith in Jesus Christ challenges them to love and respect others

Key Concepts

  • “Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God is one Lord…” (Deuteronomy 6.4).
  • Jesus is the beginning and the end, the alpha and the omega.
  • Faith cannot be fully explained, but it is reasonable. Faith admits mystery.
  • Our moral life has its source in faith in God, who reveals his love to us. (CCC #2087) Faith in God’s love encom- passes the call and the obligation to respond with love and respect – the first and second command- ments call us to love and respect God above everything, and to respect all creatures for and because of God.
  • Being faithful means being open to develop- ing our relationship with God.

Theme 2: What’s the point of prayer?

Outcomes
Students will

  • define Christian prayer
  • locate in Scripture, describe and demonstrate five forms of prayer:
    • Adoration and Blessing
    • Petition
    • Intercession
    • Thanksgiving
    • Praise
  • express different ways that God responds to prayer
  • demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between human freedom, divine prerogative and prayer

Key Concepts

  • “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heav- en” (Matthew 5.3).
  • Prayer is our living relationship with God.
  • The third commandment calls us to stop and pray. The Sunday celebration of the Lord’s Day and his Eucharist is at the heart of the Church’s life.
  • Jesus teaches us how to pray.
  • God always answers our prayers.
  • God answers our prayers in ways that are not limited by our own perspectives. God’s view is infinitely bigger than our view.
  • In answering our prayers, God does not take away human free- dom.
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Theme 1: How do I look?

Outcomes
Students will

  • value the sacredness of the human body, regardless of appearance
  • identify ways that we can co-operate with God in car- ing for our bodies
  • express ways in which the Incarnation shows the sacredness of the human body
  • respect physical change as integral to God’s creation of us
  • understand the ways we use our bodies in prayer

Key Concepts

  • The Incarnation shows us the sacredness of the human body.
  • Jesus affirms the dignity of every person.
  • We are made in the image and likeness of God.
  • The fifth commandment underlines the sacredness of human life.
  • We are called to co-operate with God in the care of our bodies.
  • God’s creation of us does not end: we constantly change physically; we are called to respect that change in ourselves and others.

Theme 2: How do I know what I know?

Outcomes
Students will

  • identify their own preferred ways of learning
  • name a variety of ways of learning and of growing intellectually
  • respect the unique intellect of each person
  • consider how intellect shapes faith
  • realize God’s desire to be known through Jesus Christ

Key Concepts

  • Each person has a unique way of learning.
  • The fifth commandment underlines the value of all people, regardless of their abilities.
  • God desires all to come to know the truth – especially religious truth, which enables us to know and love God.
  • Searching, questioning and doubt may be avenues to intellectual growth.
  • We change intellectually throughout life; this is part of God’s plan.

Theme 3: Is it okay to feel this way?

Outcomes
Students will

  • identify emotions and their functions in their lives
  • demonstratehowfaith guides how we act in response to our emotions
  • respect the right of all people to experience their own feelings
  • understand that there are morally acceptable and morally unacceptable ways to express any emotion

Key Concepts

  • “Blessedarethosewho mourn, for they will be com- forted” (Matthew 5.4).
  • God created us to experience a wide range of emotions.
  • Everyhumanlife,fromthe moment of conception until death, is sacred because the human person has been willed for its own sake in the image and likeness of the living and holy God (CCC #2319). The way we express our emotions must respect the sacredness of all human life.
  • ThroughouremotionsGod calls us to decision and action.
  • Ouremotionsareagiftthat helps us to relate to others and to God.
  • Emotions are not “good” or “bad” in themselves. “Passions are morally good when they contribute to a good action, evil in the opposite case…. Emotions and feelings can be taken up into the virtues or perverted by the vices.” (CCC #1768)
  • Our faith guides our expression of emotions so that we, and those with whom we relate, become more loving.

Theme 4: How do I get along with others?

Outcomes
Students will

  • explain how they are social beings responsible for the care of one another in accordance with God’s plan
  • summarize stories where Jesus models how to live in and challenge society
  • interpret the model of table fellowship, as used by Jesus Christ, for their own lives
  • explain how the Christian concept of society is inclusive

Key Concepts

  • “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God” (Matthew 5.9).
  • God created us as social beings, called to love and serve one another.
  • Jesusmodelshowtolivein and challenge society.
  • The Christian concept of society is inclusive.
  • Faith shapes our criteria for healthy relationships.
  • Through table fellowship, Jesus changed the stan- dard for how people relate socially.
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Theme
Who do I want to be with?

Outcomes
Students will

  • explore and express the qualities of relationships they want to have
  • name how they want others to “be with them”
  • know that each person has been created with the freedom to shape his or her own relationships
  • repeat and explain the Beatitudes
  • identify ways that the Beatitudes help us understand the Christian attitude toward being with others
  • articulate the Christian call to take on the attitude of Christ

Key Concepts

  • We are created with the freedom to shape our own relationships and to determine what kind of persons we will be with others.
  • We are called to make God manifest by acting in conformity with our creation “in the image and likeness of God.” (CCC #2085)
  • Our relationship with Jesus calls us to be of the “same mind” with Jesus, looking out for the interests and well-being of others with compassion and love. (Philippians 2.1-11)
  • The Ten Commandments and the Beatitudes describe for us the paths that lead to the kingdom of heaven. The grace of the Holy Spirit helps us to travel these paths. (CCC #1724)
  • The Beatitudes outline a distinctly Christian attitude toward being with other
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Sometimes a good villain makes a good point. Recall the Grinch’s hatred for all the noise on Christmas morning.

For many of us, it is in the build up to Christmas that we get annoyed by the noise, the pushy people in the mall, lineups at every store, commercials, endless TV reruns. How do you cope with “all the noise” in the buildup to Christmas?

Read Mark 1:1-8

In all the hubbub build up to Christmas, how can you hear “the voice of one crying out in the wilderness: ‘Prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight'”?

 

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Mark 1:1-8
View in: NRSV
1The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.
2As it is written in Isaias the prophet: Behold I send my angel before thy face, who shall prepare the way before thee.
3A voice of one crying in the desert: Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight his paths.
4John was in the desert baptizing, and preaching the baptism of penance, unto remission of sins.
5And there went out to him all the country of Judea, and all they of Jerusalem, and were baptized by him in the river of Jordan, confessing their sins.
6And John was clothed with camel's hair, and a leathern girdle about his loins; and he ate locusts and wild honey.
7And he preached, saying: There cometh after me one mightier than I, the latchet of whose shoes I am not worthy to stoop down and loose.
8I have baptized you with water; but he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost.

Read Mark 13:33-37

What if every moment were one in which we might meet our God? What might we notice? How might we act?

 

Extra:

Jean Pierre de Caussade invites us into what he calls “the sacramentality of the present moment.” What other bits of wisdom can you discern from his book Abandonment; OR, Absolute Surrender to Divine Providence. What does he mean by the term Abandonment?

 

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Mark 1:1-8
View in: NRSV
1The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.
2As it is written in Isaias the prophet: Behold I send my angel before thy face, who shall prepare the way before thee.
3A voice of one crying in the desert: Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight his paths.
4John was in the desert baptizing, and preaching the baptism of penance, unto remission of sins.
5And there went out to him all the country of Judea, and all they of Jerusalem, and were baptized by him in the river of Jordan, confessing their sins.
6And John was clothed with camel's hair, and a leathern girdle about his loins; and he ate locusts and wild honey.
7And he preached, saying: There cometh after me one mightier than I, the latchet of whose shoes I am not worthy to stoop down and loose.
8I have baptized you with water; but he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost.
Mark 13:33-37
View in: NRSV
33Take ye heed, watch and pray. For ye know not when the time is.
34Even as a man who going into a far country, left his house; and gave authority to his servants over every work, and commanded the porter to watch.
35Watch ye therefore, (for you know not when the lord of the house cometh: at even, or at midnight, or at the cockcrowing, or in the morning,)
36Lest coming on a sudden, he find you sleeping.
37And what I say to you, I say to all: Watch.

Over the centuries, the Catholic Church has developed a teaching on peace and just war.

Peace: CCC 2304

Peace, it states, is the result of justice and charity. One must always be a creator of peace and reconciliation.

Just War: CCC 2309

If relationships between peoples become so tense that war threatens, certain clear conditions for a legitimate defensive war must be maintained. For example, all other means to resolve conflict must have been exhausted before resorting to military force as a way to defend oneself.

 

Take a closer look at a current conflict in the world. Write about the conflict as an advocate of Peace or Just War.

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Mark 1:1-8
View in: NRSV
1The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.
2As it is written in Isaias the prophet: Behold I send my angel before thy face, who shall prepare the way before thee.
3A voice of one crying in the desert: Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight his paths.
4John was in the desert baptizing, and preaching the baptism of penance, unto remission of sins.
5And there went out to him all the country of Judea, and all they of Jerusalem, and were baptized by him in the river of Jordan, confessing their sins.
6And John was clothed with camel's hair, and a leathern girdle about his loins; and he ate locusts and wild honey.
7And he preached, saying: There cometh after me one mightier than I, the latchet of whose shoes I am not worthy to stoop down and loose.
8I have baptized you with water; but he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost.
Mark 13:33-37
View in: NRSV
33Take ye heed, watch and pray. For ye know not when the time is.
34Even as a man who going into a far country, left his house; and gave authority to his servants over every work, and commanded the porter to watch.
35Watch ye therefore, (for you know not when the lord of the house cometh: at even, or at midnight, or at the cockcrowing, or in the morning,)
36Lest coming on a sudden, he find you sleeping.
37And what I say to you, I say to all: Watch.
CCC 2304
¶2304 Respect for and development of human life require peace. Peace is not merely the absence of war, and it is not limited to maintaining a balance of powers between adversaries. Peace cannot be attained on earth without safeguarding the goods of persons, free communication among men, respect for the dignity of persons and peoples, and the assiduous practice of fraternity. Peace is "the tranquillity of order." Peace is the work of justice and the effect of charity.
CCC 2309
¶2309 The strict conditions for legitimate defense by military force require rigorous consideration. The gravity of such a decision makes it subject to rigorous conditions of moral legitimacy. At one and the same time:

- the damage inflicted by the aggressor on the nation or community of nations must be lasting, grave, and certain;

- all other means of putting an end to it must have been shown to be impractical or ineffective;

- there must be serious prospects of success;

- the use of arms must not produce evils and disorders graver than the evil to be eliminated. The power of modem means of destruction weighs very heavily in evaluating this condition.

These are the traditional elements enumerated in what is called the "just war" doctrine.

The evaluation of these conditions for moral legitimacy belongs to the prudential judgment of those who have responsibility for the common good.

Read the Beatitudes in Matthew 5:3-10. Who are the people in your life who show you examples of each of these “Be Attitudes”? Write about how these people – and you – demonstrate how to live the Beatitudes.

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Mark 1:1-8
View in: NRSV
1The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.
2As it is written in Isaias the prophet: Behold I send my angel before thy face, who shall prepare the way before thee.
3A voice of one crying in the desert: Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight his paths.
4John was in the desert baptizing, and preaching the baptism of penance, unto remission of sins.
5And there went out to him all the country of Judea, and all they of Jerusalem, and were baptized by him in the river of Jordan, confessing their sins.
6And John was clothed with camel's hair, and a leathern girdle about his loins; and he ate locusts and wild honey.
7And he preached, saying: There cometh after me one mightier than I, the latchet of whose shoes I am not worthy to stoop down and loose.
8I have baptized you with water; but he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost.
Mark 13:33-37
View in: NRSV
33Take ye heed, watch and pray. For ye know not when the time is.
34Even as a man who going into a far country, left his house; and gave authority to his servants over every work, and commanded the porter to watch.
35Watch ye therefore, (for you know not when the lord of the house cometh: at even, or at midnight, or at the cockcrowing, or in the morning,)
36Lest coming on a sudden, he find you sleeping.
37And what I say to you, I say to all: Watch.
CCC 2304
¶2304 Respect for and development of human life require peace. Peace is not merely the absence of war, and it is not limited to maintaining a balance of powers between adversaries. Peace cannot be attained on earth without safeguarding the goods of persons, free communication among men, respect for the dignity of persons and peoples, and the assiduous practice of fraternity. Peace is "the tranquillity of order." Peace is the work of justice and the effect of charity.
CCC 2309
¶2309 The strict conditions for legitimate defense by military force require rigorous consideration. The gravity of such a decision makes it subject to rigorous conditions of moral legitimacy. At one and the same time:

- the damage inflicted by the aggressor on the nation or community of nations must be lasting, grave, and certain;

- all other means of putting an end to it must have been shown to be impractical or ineffective;

- there must be serious prospects of success;

- the use of arms must not produce evils and disorders graver than the evil to be eliminated. The power of modem means of destruction weighs very heavily in evaluating this condition.

These are the traditional elements enumerated in what is called the "just war" doctrine.

The evaluation of these conditions for moral legitimacy belongs to the prudential judgment of those who have responsibility for the common good.

Matthew 5:3-10
View in: NRSV
3Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
4Blessed are the meek: for they shall possess the land.
5Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted.
6Blessed are they that hunger and thirst after justice: for they shall have their fill.
7Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy.
8Blessed are the clean of heart: for they shall see God.
9Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called children of God.
10Blessed are they that suffer persecution for justice' sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

https://w2.vatican.va/content/dam/francesco/pdf/apost_exhortations/documents/papa-francesco_esortazione-ap_20160319_amoris-laetitia_en.pdf

 

Paragraph 286 from Amoris Laetitia

 

286. Nor can we ignore the fact that the configuration of our own mode of being, whether as male or female, is not simply the result of biological or genetic factors, but of multiple elements having to do with temperament, family history, culture, experience, education, the influence of friends, family members and respected persons, as well as other formative situations. It is true that we cannot separate the masculine and the feminine from God’s work of creation, which is prior to all our decisions and experiences, and where biological elements exist which are impossible to ignore. But it is also true that masculinity and femininity are not rigid categories. It is possible, for example, that a husband’s way of being masculine can be flexibly adapted to the wife’s work schedule. Taking on domestic chores or some aspects of raising children does not make him any less masculine or imply failure, irresponsibility or cause for shame. Children have to be helped to accept as normal such healthy “exchanges” which do not diminish the dignity of the father figure. A rigid approach turns into an overaccentuation of the masculine or feminine, and does not help children and young people to appreciate the genuine reciprocity incarnate in the real conditions of matrimony. Such rigidity, in turn, can hinder the development of an individual’s abilities, to the point of leading him or her to think, for example, that it is not really masculine to cultivate art or dance, or not very feminine to exercise leadership. This, thank God, has 216 changed, but in some places deficient notions still condition the legitimate freedom and hamper the authentic development of children’s specific identity and potential.

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Mark 1:1-8
View in: NRSV
1The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.
2As it is written in Isaias the prophet: Behold I send my angel before thy face, who shall prepare the way before thee.
3A voice of one crying in the desert: Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight his paths.
4John was in the desert baptizing, and preaching the baptism of penance, unto remission of sins.
5And there went out to him all the country of Judea, and all they of Jerusalem, and were baptized by him in the river of Jordan, confessing their sins.
6And John was clothed with camel's hair, and a leathern girdle about his loins; and he ate locusts and wild honey.
7And he preached, saying: There cometh after me one mightier than I, the latchet of whose shoes I am not worthy to stoop down and loose.
8I have baptized you with water; but he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost.
Mark 13:33-37
View in: NRSV
33Take ye heed, watch and pray. For ye know not when the time is.
34Even as a man who going into a far country, left his house; and gave authority to his servants over every work, and commanded the porter to watch.
35Watch ye therefore, (for you know not when the lord of the house cometh: at even, or at midnight, or at the cockcrowing, or in the morning,)
36Lest coming on a sudden, he find you sleeping.
37And what I say to you, I say to all: Watch.
CCC 2304
¶2304 Respect for and development of human life require peace. Peace is not merely the absence of war, and it is not limited to maintaining a balance of powers between adversaries. Peace cannot be attained on earth without safeguarding the goods of persons, free communication among men, respect for the dignity of persons and peoples, and the assiduous practice of fraternity. Peace is "the tranquillity of order." Peace is the work of justice and the effect of charity.
CCC 2309
¶2309 The strict conditions for legitimate defense by military force require rigorous consideration. The gravity of such a decision makes it subject to rigorous conditions of moral legitimacy. At one and the same time:

- the damage inflicted by the aggressor on the nation or community of nations must be lasting, grave, and certain;

- all other means of putting an end to it must have been shown to be impractical or ineffective;

- there must be serious prospects of success;

- the use of arms must not produce evils and disorders graver than the evil to be eliminated. The power of modem means of destruction weighs very heavily in evaluating this condition.

These are the traditional elements enumerated in what is called the "just war" doctrine.

The evaluation of these conditions for moral legitimacy belongs to the prudential judgment of those who have responsibility for the common good.

Matthew 5:3-10
View in: NRSV
3Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
4Blessed are the meek: for they shall possess the land.
5Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted.
6Blessed are they that hunger and thirst after justice: for they shall have their fill.
7Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy.
8Blessed are the clean of heart: for they shall see God.
9Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called children of God.
10Blessed are they that suffer persecution for justice' sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

http://www.vatican.va/evangelii-gaudium/en/files/assets/basic-html/page40.html

 

The Eucharist, although it is the fullness of sacramental life, is not a prize for the perfect but a powerful medicine and nourishment for the weak.
We are to be facilitators of grace, not arbiters.
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Mark 1:1-8
View in: NRSV
1The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.
2As it is written in Isaias the prophet: Behold I send my angel before thy face, who shall prepare the way before thee.
3A voice of one crying in the desert: Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight his paths.
4John was in the desert baptizing, and preaching the baptism of penance, unto remission of sins.
5And there went out to him all the country of Judea, and all they of Jerusalem, and were baptized by him in the river of Jordan, confessing their sins.
6And John was clothed with camel's hair, and a leathern girdle about his loins; and he ate locusts and wild honey.
7And he preached, saying: There cometh after me one mightier than I, the latchet of whose shoes I am not worthy to stoop down and loose.
8I have baptized you with water; but he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost.
Mark 13:33-37
View in: NRSV
33Take ye heed, watch and pray. For ye know not when the time is.
34Even as a man who going into a far country, left his house; and gave authority to his servants over every work, and commanded the porter to watch.
35Watch ye therefore, (for you know not when the lord of the house cometh: at even, or at midnight, or at the cockcrowing, or in the morning,)
36Lest coming on a sudden, he find you sleeping.
37And what I say to you, I say to all: Watch.
CCC 2304
¶2304 Respect for and development of human life require peace. Peace is not merely the absence of war, and it is not limited to maintaining a balance of powers between adversaries. Peace cannot be attained on earth without safeguarding the goods of persons, free communication among men, respect for the dignity of persons and peoples, and the assiduous practice of fraternity. Peace is "the tranquillity of order." Peace is the work of justice and the effect of charity.
CCC 2309
¶2309 The strict conditions for legitimate defense by military force require rigorous consideration. The gravity of such a decision makes it subject to rigorous conditions of moral legitimacy. At one and the same time:

- the damage inflicted by the aggressor on the nation or community of nations must be lasting, grave, and certain;

- all other means of putting an end to it must have been shown to be impractical or ineffective;

- there must be serious prospects of success;

- the use of arms must not produce evils and disorders graver than the evil to be eliminated. The power of modem means of destruction weighs very heavily in evaluating this condition.

These are the traditional elements enumerated in what is called the "just war" doctrine.

The evaluation of these conditions for moral legitimacy belongs to the prudential judgment of those who have responsibility for the common good.

Matthew 5:3-10
View in: NRSV
3Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
4Blessed are the meek: for they shall possess the land.
5Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted.
6Blessed are they that hunger and thirst after justice: for they shall have their fill.
7Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy.
8Blessed are the clean of heart: for they shall see God.
9Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called children of God.
10Blessed are they that suffer persecution for justice' sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

1 Corinthians 13:4–13:7

4Love is patient; love is kind; love is not envious or boastful or arrogant5or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful;6it does not rejoice in wrongdoing, but rejoices in the truth. 7It bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.

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Mark 1:1-8
View in: NRSV
1The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.
2As it is written in Isaias the prophet: Behold I send my angel before thy face, who shall prepare the way before thee.
3A voice of one crying in the desert: Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight his paths.
4John was in the desert baptizing, and preaching the baptism of penance, unto remission of sins.
5And there went out to him all the country of Judea, and all they of Jerusalem, and were baptized by him in the river of Jordan, confessing their sins.
6And John was clothed with camel's hair, and a leathern girdle about his loins; and he ate locusts and wild honey.
7And he preached, saying: There cometh after me one mightier than I, the latchet of whose shoes I am not worthy to stoop down and loose.
8I have baptized you with water; but he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost.
Mark 13:33-37
View in: NRSV
33Take ye heed, watch and pray. For ye know not when the time is.
34Even as a man who going into a far country, left his house; and gave authority to his servants over every work, and commanded the porter to watch.
35Watch ye therefore, (for you know not when the lord of the house cometh: at even, or at midnight, or at the cockcrowing, or in the morning,)
36Lest coming on a sudden, he find you sleeping.
37And what I say to you, I say to all: Watch.
CCC 2304
¶2304 Respect for and development of human life require peace. Peace is not merely the absence of war, and it is not limited to maintaining a balance of powers between adversaries. Peace cannot be attained on earth without safeguarding the goods of persons, free communication among men, respect for the dignity of persons and peoples, and the assiduous practice of fraternity. Peace is "the tranquillity of order." Peace is the work of justice and the effect of charity.
CCC 2309
¶2309 The strict conditions for legitimate defense by military force require rigorous consideration. The gravity of such a decision makes it subject to rigorous conditions of moral legitimacy. At one and the same time:

- the damage inflicted by the aggressor on the nation or community of nations must be lasting, grave, and certain;

- all other means of putting an end to it must have been shown to be impractical or ineffective;

- there must be serious prospects of success;

- the use of arms must not produce evils and disorders graver than the evil to be eliminated. The power of modem means of destruction weighs very heavily in evaluating this condition.

These are the traditional elements enumerated in what is called the "just war" doctrine.

The evaluation of these conditions for moral legitimacy belongs to the prudential judgment of those who have responsibility for the common good.

Matthew 5:3-10
View in: NRSV
3Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
4Blessed are the meek: for they shall possess the land.
5Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted.
6Blessed are they that hunger and thirst after justice: for they shall have their fill.
7Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy.
8Blessed are the clean of heart: for they shall see God.
9Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called children of God.
10Blessed are they that suffer persecution for justice' sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
1 Corinthians 13:4
View in: NRSV
4Charity is patient, is kind: charity envieth not, dealeth not perversely; is not puffed up;
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