Posts tagged ‘challenge’

A tableau or tableau vivant is a representation of a scene. No movement takes place. Students simply take positions to portray the main message of a scene. They freeze in that position for about 30 seconds. (Like a youtube “mannequin challenge” of sorts.)

Join a small group, pick one tableau. When it is your turn, present your scene. While watching other groups present their tableau, discuss/think about what you saw.

 

Reflection or discussion:
How do you feel if you spend time with your friends in this way? When is it most important to be together this way?

Tabeau

  • Portray a scene in which all are friends in the group and they are all enjoying doing the same thing together.
  • Portray a scene in which one person in the group wants to talk to one other person in the group privately.
  • Portray a scene in which members of the group enjoy being together, but not necessarily all doing the same thing together.
  • Portray a scene in which the people enjoy small groups rather than a large group.
  • Portray a scene in which the people enjoy talking in a large group.
  • Portray a scene in which the people enjoy talking in twos or threes.
  • Portray a scene in which one member of the group is introducing a new person to the group. The others in the group welcome this new person.
  • Portray a scene in which one member is sad. The others comfort this person in various ways.
  • Portray a scene in which members of the group celebrate the good fortune or success of one or two members.
  • Portray a scene in which one or more members are trying to be peacemakers among friends who have had a disagreement.

Groups

Groups A B C D E F
1 ROBERT RILEY HANNAH DELAYNA RYLAND DAWSON
2 SOPHIE MATTHEW BRANDON KAIDEN ALEX JAYCE
3 LEVI KEIFFER KENNEDY ANGELICA KAMDEN RYAN
4 COLTON RUTH SAIGE MYRANDA MORGAN
5 AUSTIN JOANNA VICKIE KYLIE LOUISE DIXIE
6 SHELBY DAYGAN E.J. JESSIE CORBIN KAMRYN

Theme 1: Why should I obey my parents or anyone else in my family?

Outcomes
Students will

  • explain and interpret the fourth commandment as it applies to families
  • express the value of obedience and name the challenge of and limits to the Christian call to obedience
  • identify duties, roles and responsibilities that are shared within Christian families
  • explain how family life is the original cell of social life

Key Concepts

  • A Christian family is a communion of faith, hope and charity. It is the domestic Church.
  • The fourth commandment calls us to live in charity, starting with honour and respect for our parents, and for all whom God, for our good, has vested with authority.
  • Jesus himself recognized the authority vested in his parents, and was obedient to them (see Luke 2.51).
  • “Children, obey your parents in the Lord, for this is right…” (Ephesians 6.1; Colossians 3.20).
  • Family life is the original cell of social life.

Theme 2: Whom should I obey in society?

Outcomes
Students will

  • recognize legitimate authority within various sectors of society: school, civic community, Church
  • explain what makes authority legitimate (i.e., the common good)
  • identify, explain and affirm the duties they have as subjects of legitimate authority

Key Concepts

  • Human society requires that some of its people be vested with legitimate authority to work and care for the good of all.
  • The authority required by the moral order derives from God.
  • The duty of obedience requires all to give due honour and respect to legitimate authority.
  • The fourth commandment calls us to hon- our not only our par- ents, but also those who for our good have received authority in society from God.
  • The dignity of the human person requires the pursuit of the common good. Everyone should be concerned to create and support institu- tions that improve the conditions of human life.
  • Christ himself is the source of authority within the Church.

Theme 1: How do I look?

Outcomes
Students will

  • value the sacredness of the human body, regardless of appearance
  • identify ways that we can co-operate with God in car- ing for our bodies
  • express ways in which the Incarnation shows the sacredness of the human body
  • respect physical change as integral to God’s creation of us
  • understand the ways we use our bodies in prayer

Key Concepts

  • The Incarnation shows us the sacredness of the human body.
  • Jesus affirms the dignity of every person.
  • We are made in the image and likeness of God.
  • The fifth commandment underlines the sacredness of human life.
  • We are called to co-operate with God in the care of our bodies.
  • God’s creation of us does not end: we constantly change physically; we are called to respect that change in ourselves and others.

Theme 2: How do I know what I know?

Outcomes
Students will

  • identify their own preferred ways of learning
  • name a variety of ways of learning and of growing intellectually
  • respect the unique intellect of each person
  • consider how intellect shapes faith
  • realize God’s desire to be known through Jesus Christ

Key Concepts

  • Each person has a unique way of learning.
  • The fifth commandment underlines the value of all people, regardless of their abilities.
  • God desires all to come to know the truth – especially religious truth, which enables us to know and love God.
  • Searching, questioning and doubt may be avenues to intellectual growth.
  • We change intellectually throughout life; this is part of God’s plan.

Theme 3: Is it okay to feel this way?

Outcomes
Students will

  • identify emotions and their functions in their lives
  • demonstratehowfaith guides how we act in response to our emotions
  • respect the right of all people to experience their own feelings
  • understand that there are morally acceptable and morally unacceptable ways to express any emotion

Key Concepts

  • “Blessedarethosewho mourn, for they will be com- forted” (Matthew 5.4).
  • God created us to experience a wide range of emotions.
  • Everyhumanlife,fromthe moment of conception until death, is sacred because the human person has been willed for its own sake in the image and likeness of the living and holy God (CCC #2319). The way we express our emotions must respect the sacredness of all human life.
  • ThroughouremotionsGod calls us to decision and action.
  • Ouremotionsareagiftthat helps us to relate to others and to God.
  • Emotions are not “good” or “bad” in themselves. “Passions are morally good when they contribute to a good action, evil in the opposite case…. Emotions and feelings can be taken up into the virtues or perverted by the vices.” (CCC #1768)
  • Our faith guides our expression of emotions so that we, and those with whom we relate, become more loving.

Theme 4: How do I get along with others?

Outcomes
Students will

  • explain how they are social beings responsible for the care of one another in accordance with God’s plan
  • summarize stories where Jesus models how to live in and challenge society
  • interpret the model of table fellowship, as used by Jesus Christ, for their own lives
  • explain how the Christian concept of society is inclusive

Key Concepts

  • “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God” (Matthew 5.9).
  • God created us as social beings, called to love and serve one another.
  • Jesusmodelshowtolivein and challenge society.
  • The Christian concept of society is inclusive.
  • Faith shapes our criteria for healthy relationships.
  • Through table fellowship, Jesus changed the stan- dard for how people relate socially.

“The Spirit of God dwells in you.” – Romans 8:9

  1. In this time of Thanksgiving, what beauty do I see within and around me?
  2. How does this invite me to give thanks to God in worship, service, and life?
  3. What challenge do I face in my daily life that can dim my spirit?
  4. “Whatever does not bring you more joy or make you more alive is too small for you.” What does this statement mean to me?

“Every part of the earth is sacred. Whatever befalls the earth, befalls the sons and daughters of the earth. All things are connected.” – Chief Seattle

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