Posts tagged ‘Romans’

After viewing the film Glory Road write a 5 paragraph essay response to the question: What Does It Take to Change the World?

Pick and choose from the following six ideas to develop your own thesis and topic sentences. In your essay refer to specific detail from the film, your own experiences, and passages from Scripture to develop your response to the question: What Does It Take to Change the World?

One: Recruiting Strategies
(read Luke 14:15-24; 1 Corinthians 1:24-31; and John 3:16-18; John 1:12-13)

  • How does Coach Haskins change his recruiting methods after the traditional methods fail?
    In school, when a team “captain” was choosing up sides for a team — what determined if someone got picked or not?
  • Have you ever wanted to be part of something — knowing you could do well — only to be rejected? Or have you ever rejected someone because of their race, the way they talked, the clothes they wore, or where they lived? Describe your experience.
  • When Paul comments about “the wise” who do you think he is talking about? Who would represent the “wise” in Glory Road?
  • What kind of people does God “recruit?”
  • What does God use as His standard for who makes the team?

Two: Good Players Need Good Coaching
(read 1 Corinthians 12:12-27; 2 Timothy 2:2-7)

  • Name some of the behaviors that players on the Texas Western team had to overcome in order to become winners.
  • What kinds of things did Coach Haskins do to discipline his team so that they would work together?
  • What does the Bible say about why some people might not work well together?
  • Name some roles Christians play in changing the world for Christ.
  • Describe a coaching or mentoring relationship you have or had in school. What effect did the coaching have on your performance? What characteristics did you most appreciate in the person who was helping you?
  • What does Timothy — and the rest of us — learn about playing on God’s team from each of the examples that Paul uses?
  • Where should we go to find out what we should do, what the rules are, and how to work hard?
  • Once we have learned how to change the world for Christ, what does Paul say we should do with that knowledge?

Three: Great Players Persevere
(read 1 Peter 5:8; 1 Peter 4:12-19; James 1:2-3, 12 and Romans 5:1-5)

  • What were some of the responses people had when the Texas Western team began to win — especially when they began to beat highly-ranked teams?
  • Once things got really bad, what happened to the team?
  • How was their internal conflict demonstrated outwardly?
  • Who is one of our opponents?
  • Why shouldn’t we be surprised that we face opposition?
  • What does it mean to be reviled?
  • What do James and Paul say we should do in the face of difficult opposition?
  • What is the end result of endurance and perseverance?

Four: Players Don’t Stand Alone
(read Romans 12:4-13, Philippians 2:1-11 and Hebrews 10:23-25)

  • When Coach Haskins announces his decision to his team — what is their response?
  • Some of the white players would never again get a chance to play in a championship tournament, so why do you think they agreed to sit out the game?
  • What lines of support did you see develop that helped Texas Western to prevail? According to the Bible, what are some ways we can show support for one another?
  • How does meeting together regularly contribute to the support of all members?

Five: All Players Triumph through Belief and Action
(read James 2:14-26)

  • What obstacles have you overcome in your life?
  • Can you give some examples of how action confirms belief?
  • What kind of actions can you take that will lead others to Jesus and help to change the world for Christ

Six: Go Play to Win!
(read 1 Corinthians 9:25-27)

  • What one thing will you change about yourself this week to help win the world for Christ?
  • What one thing will you commit yourself to do for someone else in this room to help them in their faith
  • Discuss what you can do to reach out to others and help them to join God’s team.

NRSV translation of the related Scriptures from http://bible.oremus.org/:
James 2:1-10
Luke 14:15-24
1 Corinthians 1:24-31
John 3:16-18
John 1:12-13
1 Corinthians 12:12-27
2 Timothy 2:2-7
1 Peter 5:8
1 Peter 4:12-19
James 1:2-3
James 1:12
Romans 5:1-5
Romans 12:4-13
Philippians 2:1-11
Hebrews 10:23-25
James 2:14-26
1 Corinthians 9:25-27

“The Spirit of God dwells in you.” – Romans 8:9

  1. In this time of Thanksgiving, what beauty do I see within and around me?
  2. How does this invite me to give thanks to God in worship, service, and life?
  3. What challenge do I face in my daily life that can dim my spirit?
  4. “Whatever does not bring you more joy or make you more alive is too small for you.” What does this statement mean to me?

“Every part of the earth is sacred. Whatever befalls the earth, befalls the sons and daughters of the earth. All things are connected.” – Chief Seattle

The history of the Jews goes back thousands of years. Below are some important evens in the first thousand years of the Common Era. Use your knowledge of Judaism, and the history of the region to determine their correct order. Number them 1-8, with 1 as the earliest event.

a. After the Jewish expulsion from Jerusalem by the Romans, Jewish oral law is written down in a book called the Mishnah.
b. Jews in the Roman Empire are repressed.
c. The Romans reconquer Jerusalem and destroy the Temple.
d. The Muslim Empire expands to cover southwestern Asia, northern Aftrica, and Spain
e. Jews rebel against Roman rule and seize Jerusalem.
f. The Jews begin to scatter around the world.
g. Christianity becomes the primary religion of the Roman Empire.
h. The Romans crush the rebellion and prohibit Jews from living in Jerusalem.

Masada is an oblong mountain in Israel, near the Dead Sea. It has steep sides but an almost flat top and a panoramic view of the land around it.

In 70 C.E., Jerusalem was conquered by a Roman army, and the temple was destroyed. A group of about 1,000 Jewish resisters, called Zealots, fled Jerusalem and went to Masada. A fortress stood at the top of the mountain. Surrounded by ravines, the fortress was approached only by two narrow tracks. The Zealots took refuge in this inaccessible place.

The 15,000-man Roman army laid siege to Masada. Because of the mountain’s steep sides, they could not come close enough to the fortress to take it. Finally after a two-year siege, the Romans managed to build a ramp up one of the slopes of the mountain. When they entered the fortress, they found the Zealots dead. Rather than surrender to the Romans, the Zealots had killed themselves. Only seven women and children, who had hidden in a cistern, remained alive to surrender.

Today Masada is a symbol of freedom and independence for the Jews. Why do you think this is so?

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