Friendship Tableau

Friendship Tableau:

As a class we demonstrated scenes, Friendship Tableau’s. Similar to the mannequin challenge, we froze a scene.  We froze silently, while the rest of the class observed. After the Class had to guess what we were trying to demonstrate. Before we had to freeze our scene, a group was given a slip that described the scene, we then discussed how we were going to freeze, while we were alone in the hallway. We then froze the tableau for our class. The tableau’s were one of few that Mr. Sader chose from, to give to us. Here were his options.

  • “Portray a scene in which all are friends in the group and they are all enjoying doing the same thing together”
  • “Portray a scene in which one person in the group wants to talk to one other person in the group privately”
  • “Portray a scene in which members of the group enjoy being together, but not necessarily all doing the same thing together.”
  • “Portray a scene in which the people enjoy small groups rather than a large group.”
  • “Portray a scene in which the people enjoy talking in a large group.”
  • “Portray a scene in which the people enjoy talking in twos or threes.”
  • “Portray a scene in which one member of the group is introducing a new person to the group. The others in the group welcome this new person.”
  • “Portray a scene in which one member is sad. The others comfort this person in various ways”
  • “Portray a scene in which members of the group celebrate the good fortune or success of one or two members”
  • “Portray a scene in which one or more members are trying to be peacemakers among friends who have had a disagreement.”

Friendship Tableaus

The way we were divided, we all ended up in two separate groups. It was difficult freezing these scenes, while trying to demonstrate the tableau.  Whenever a group received “Portray a scene in which one or more members are trying to be peacemakers among friends who have had a disagreement,” the group would have two people fighting physically.  Fists were clenched in the air, and the others were trying to peacefully negotiate. Everytime this tableau was portrayed, we saw physical fighting. There were different ways in which they showed the peacemakers. Sometimes they would hold back the fighters, or stand between, But sometimes they would hold up two fingers, representing the “Peace sign.”  Mr. Sader was hoping for different ways the conflict could have been shown, other than physical.

One of the groups I was in had to do “Portray a scene in which one member is sad. The others comfort this person in various ways.” There were four of us. I covered my face, to show as if I was crying. Two people showed empathy and patted my shoulders. One person wasn’t keen on participating, so they stood off to the side doing nothing. When our classmates spoke on what they saw they often said I was sad, because the one person off to the side made me sad, and the other two were comforting me. We had asked the person to do something else but they didn’t. Mr. Sader then read the tableau out to the class and emphasized “Various ways.” Mr. Sader said it could have been looked as the person standing off to the side was comforting me by giving me space instead.  There were many ways we could have froze this scene.

A scene that seemed hard for us to freeze without moving, talking and acting was “Portray a scene in which one person in the group wants to talk to one other person in the group privately.”  We found it hard. We could sometimes see people trying to get each others attention, but them trying to discuss in private wasn’t easily shown. Sometimes we could also see people wanting to, or talking, but it wasn’t represented privately. It was hard to comprehend when looking at the scene. It needed to be thought out better, before placed in front of the class.

This was a good experience trying to portray these tableau’s.  We learned different skills. We had to communicate and make it work for our group and the audience. It was a good team working and learning experience.

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