Tag Archives: parent

Parent Guide: Five reasons why being kind makes you feel good

This week in class, we’re reading “Five reasons why being kind makes you feel good — according to science” by Jo Cutler, Robin Banerjee.

In the informational text, “Five reasons why being kind makes you feel good — according to science” Jo Cutler and Robin Banerjee discuss why being kind to others can improve your mood.

As we read, we will be discussing the theme of Morality as it relates to the text. We are trying to answer this big question :

“What is good and how do we know?”

Ways to support your child:

Parent Guide: Altruism

This week in class, we’re reading “Altruism: Why We Risk Our Own Well-Being to Help Others” by Kendra Cherry.

In the informational text “Altruism: Why We Risk Our Own Well-Being to Help Others,” Kendra Cherry discusses various theories for why humans act altruistically.

As we read, we will be discussing the themes of CommunityEducation & Knowledge, and Morality as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“What is the importance of community?”, “How do we understand the world around us?”, and “What is good and how do we know?”

Ways to support your child:

Parent Guide: Working at the Hospital

This week in class, we’re reading “Working at the Hospital” by Barbara Radner.

In the informational text “Working at the Hospital,” Barbara Radner describes the different jobs at the hospital.

As we read, we will be discussing the theme of Community as it relates to the text. We are trying to answer this big question :

“What is the importance of community?”

Ways to support your child:

Parent Guide: Readtheory KP Goal (50)

Students will be assigned a Readtheory goal in Google Classroom that depends on their accumulated “Knowledge Point” score or KP.

You can help support your child’s learning by asking them to show you their “Readtheory Dashboard” and recording their “Knowledge Point” total at the beginning of the week.  Periodically check that that number is increasing during the week.

I have asked that they accumulate 50 KP this week. I really hope this is attainable in the 1 hour work limit per week per course per child.

If the 50 KP points goal is too hard (or too easy) to achieve in one week, let me know – have the student leave a comment in the assignment stream in Google Classroom. I will make adjustments where necessary.

How can students earn knowledge points?

Students can earn knowledge points in the following ways:
• Answer a regular question correctly: 1KP
• Answer a challenge question correctly: 2KP (+1KP for regular question)
• Pass a quiz: 15KP awarded (70% is a pass in ReadTheory)
• Get a perfect score on a quiz: 30KP awarded

Parent Guide: Nice Kids Finish First

This week in class, we’re reading “Nice Kids Finish First: Study Finds Social Skills Can Predict Future Success” by Audie Cornish.

This interview from NPR’s All Things Considered, hosted by Audie Cornish, discusses a recent study’s findings that children who demonstrate more ‘pro-social’ skills – those who share more and who are better listeners – are more likely to have jobs and stay out of trouble as young adults.

As we read, we will be discussing the themes of Education & Knowledge and Resilience & Success as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“What is the goal of education?” and “Why do people succeed?”

Ways to support your child:

Parent Guide: Readtheory KP Goal (100)

Students will be assigned a Readtheory goal in Google Classroom that depends on their accumulated “Knowledge Point” score or KP.

You can help support your child’s learning by asking them to show you their “Readtheory Dashboard” and recording their “Knowledge Point” total at the beginning of the week.  Periodically check that that number is increasing during the week.

I have asked that they accumulate 100 KP this week. I hope this is attainable in the 3 hours work limit per week per course per child.

If the 100 points goal is too hard (or too easy) to achieve in one week, let me know – have the student leave a comment in the assignment stream in Google Classroom. I will make adjustments where necessary.

How can students earn knowledge points?

Students can earn knowledge points in the following ways:
• Answer a regular question correctly: 1KP
• Answer a challenge question correctly: 2KP (+1KP for regular question)
• Pass a quiz: 15KP awarded
• Get a perfect score on a quiz: 30KP awarded

Parent Guide: College students with disabilities are too often excluded

This week in class, we’re reading “College students with disabilities are too often excluded” by Christa Bialka.

In the informational text, “College students with disabilities are too often excluded,” Christa Bialka discusses how students with disabilities are not included in many on-campus activities.

As your child reads, they will be considering the themes of Community and Prejudice & Discrimination as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“What is the importance of community?” and “What are the effects of prejudice?”

Ways to support your child:

 

Hamlet: After Act 1 and 2(English 30)

Major Response
(30-1)”I know not seems.” In I, ii, 76, Hamlet claims that his grief is real, not just a show. Make a chart of all the occasions in Act 1 and 2 when there is a difference between the way a character seems to be and the way he or she really is. Create your summary with the following headings:

  • The Character
  • The Situation
  • The Appearance
  • The Reality
  • The Reason for Hiding the Truth

Fill in your ideas about the characters’ behaviour and compare your summary with those of other students.

(30-2)Consider whether or not you think Polonius is a good father. Explain which of his actions were right and which were wrong. Create your own description of a good father. Write a letter to Polonius offering him advice about ways he could become a better parent.

Act 1&2 Considerations:

  1. Why did Marcellus and Bernardo ask Horatio to join them during their watch? What character traits does Horatio possess that would suggest they were right in asking him to join them?
  2. Imagine you were a talk show host, interviewing the newly crowned Claudius, King of Denmark. In a series of questions and answers, review the information provided in I,ii.
  3. Describe the Hamlet revealed in I,ii.
  4. Imagine you are an advice columnist and have received a question that deals with Laertes’ or Ophelia’s situation. Write the question and the response using exact phrases from Acts 1&2.
  5. Write a diary entry in which Ophelia or Laertes recounts some of the advice she or he has received and how she or he feels about the advice.
  6. In 1594, Thomas Nashe speculated why the devil often appeared in the likeliness of a parent or relative: “No other reason can be given of it but this, that in those shapes which he supposeth most familiar unto us, and that we are inclined to with a natural kind of love, we will sooner hearken to him than otherwise.” Hamlet’s friends offer him reasons to not trust the apparition of his father. Summarize these reasons. How does Hamlet respond and what does this show about his character?
  7. Knowing what he knows (in I,v), could Hamlet march into the castle and accuse Claudius of Murder? What would happen if Hamlet attempted to kill Claudius immediately? Write a short scene following Act 1 in which Hamlet accuses Claudius or attempts to kill.
  8. Imagine you are Reynaldo, in Paris, and conversing with a Dane about Laertes’ activities. Write a dialogue in which you follow Polonius’ instructions.
  9. Claudius, Gertrude, and Polonius all have differing opinions on the source of Hamlet’s madness. What are they?
  10. Read the First Player’s speech carefully. Outline what it has in common in terms of characters and situations with what has transpired in the Danish court.

While you read…Brave New World

Using the format of a blog, comment at the end of each reading session on both the substance of your reading and its effects on you.

Record pages or sections on which you are commenting. Record your impressions of characters, events, conflicts, descriptions. Record responses to your own questions. Record questions about the novel as you read. Respond to course focus questions.

Make sure you take the time after, during, or before each reading session to make an entry into your blog. 10-15 sentences per reading session might be enough.

Make each entry interesting, personal, intelligent. Avoid retelling the story or simply “dumbing-down” the text. Write posts that engages your readers in critical thinking, enhances their attention span, and fills them with speculative awe.

Write several short posts per week, once a day at least. Write longer posts when your mood strikes you. Tag each post before publishing. Use categories such as the following to keep your responses organized:

Utopia
Community, Identity, Stability
Science and Technology
Conditioning
Soma
Sensual Pleasures
Religion
Family Life
Death
Skinner
Kohlberg
Piaget
Erikson
Freud
Adler
Thoreau

Track the posts you make and the comments you send and receive in a spreadsheet. Try to spend no more than 15 minutes on the computer per class. If that isn’t enough, do more work at home or during spare time. There is a need for quite, concentrated reading time during your day. Here we go.