Posts tagged ‘jesus’

Read and respond to Who is Jesus? by Peter Kreeft.

Write a post in your iblog in which you

  1. demonstrate an understanding of the main point(s),
  2. relates an idea(s) from the reading to another text(s),
  3. offer your own arguments – agreeing or disagreeing with the points in the reading – with supporting evidence.

Consider the rubric:

Read Matthew 6:24-34.

In this Gospel reading, before Jesus tells his listeners not to worry, he says “No one can serve two masters.” Who is Jesus refering to? One master is God(Love), surely, but who is the other?

Could Jesus be refering to more specific “evils” – evils that cause us to worry and make us miserable?

What kinds of worry are normal? What kinds of worry lead to debilitating anxiety?

Consider the character Tony from Wm. Paul Young’s, “Cross Roads” – after reading Chapter 3. What “masters” does (or doesn’t) he serve? What other ideas come to mind?

Picture 1Directions: Answer the six part question below. The page titled, Movie Study Assignment Rubric, will be used to access this assignment. It can be found on the left side (sixth from bottom) under pages. When finished, print off your response and hand in or email it to Mr. S.

Introduction: To be Christian means to be a follower of Jesus Christ; to be “Christ-like”; to act as Jesus Christ would act.  Jesus is referred to as God’s “holy servant” (Acts 4:27).  If we define holy as described in Colossians 3:12-14, then it is easy to see that Jesus was a holy person.  He was compassionate (Luke 15:30; Matt 9:36).  Jesus was kind, patient and forgiving (story of adulterous woman in John 8:3-11).  He was humble (Matt 11:29) and meek (2 Cor 10:1).  But mostly, Jesus always chose love (Eph 5:2; Mark 10:21).  In fact, all the world’s religious traditions celebrate the supreme importance of six spiritual practices, which are,  compassion, forgiveness, hope, kindness, love (as in agape), and conversion (transformation).  All of these spiritual practices were illustrated in this movie.

Assignment: For each of the six spiritual practices listed above, describe one scene from the movie that demonstrates that practice.  Be as specific as you can.

Faith is relational; people influence us all the time. It is our baptismal duty to pass on the faith in how we car for one another.

Judith Dunlap, When You Teach in a Catholic School(2004) writes, that we need to affirm our youth that they are loved no matter what; God’s love is always steady. All people in a child’s life have the responsibility to help them grow in their faith and become anchored in God’s steadfast love. Students also need to be taught that they, in turn, have a responsibility to share love with others by living a life of peace, justice and respect.

Archbishop Miller for The Holy See’s Teaching on Catholic Schools(2006) emphasizes that the purpose of a Catholic school is to be a vital witness that reveals the love of Christ by word, gesture, and behaviour.

God Reveal’s His Plan:

Matthew 25:40
And the king will answer them, “Truly I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of these who are members of my family, you did it to me.”

In Evangel Gaudium, the Joy of the Gospel, Pope Francis wrote that a catechist must be strong and clear with the most important proclamation of: “Jesus Christ loves you; he gave his life to save you; and now he is living at your side every day to enlighten, strengthen, and free you.” How do these words resonate with you? What are your feelings or reactions after watching the video?

Challenge yourself that when you encourage or console someone this week, you verbally, out loud, ask God to bless then so they can hear holy words of affirmation.

Not an option, justice is a mandate of Catholic faith. From the beginning, the educational mission of the church has been seem as participation in God’s saving mission. The divine edict of justice requires education for personal and social transformation.

The Catholic school, since it is motivated by the gospel message of Jesus Christ to proclaim liberty to the oppressed, is particularly sensitive to the call from every part of the world for a more just society, and it tries to make its own contribution towards it. It does not stop at the courageous teaching of the demands into practice, first in its own community in the daily life of the school, and then in the wider community.

Catholic schools aim towards a synthesis of faith and culture, of faith and life, syntheses that characterize mature faith. A mature faith will be able to recognize and reject cultural counter-values which threaten human dignity and are therefore contrary to the gospel.

Although all the problems of religion and faith will not be completely solved by academic studies, nevertheless, the Catholic school should be a privileged place for finding adequate ways to deal with these problems.

Strategies to incorporate the Justice Dimension of Catholic schools:

220px-Alpha_logo

  • Is there more to life than this? (previously Christianity: Boring, Untrue and Irrelevant?)
  • Who is Jesus?
  • Why did Jesus die?
  • How can we have faith?
  • Why and how do I pray?
  • Why and how should I read the Bible?
  • How does God guide us?
  • Who is the Holy Spirit?
  • What does the Holy Spirit do?
  • How can I be filled with the Holy Spirit?
  • How can I resist evil?
  • Why and how should I tell others?
  • Does God heal today?
  • What about the church?
  • How can I make the most of the rest of my Life?

Read more about the Alpha Course.

The fundamental source of human knowledge is encounter with the world and its history through experience. The guiding intent for the curriculum is to educate people to become fully alive and free human beings. In a Catholic context this source and this guiding intent both point to the experience of the community, an experience where Jesus Christ is encountered and the values of the Reign of God direct human action and being. Simply put, we learn through life.

Catholic education brings a focus to learning to discover, evaluate, interpret the human experience, which is always in transition, in ways that enhance and deepen appreciation for the gift of creation and provide insight into how learning can lead to fullness and freedom for all people.

Strategies to develop a respect for the life-giving dimensions of tradition:

  • Provide access to the tradition of human culture–works of art, literature, etc.–as a way of engaging learners in conversation with the past
  • Invite learners to bring the symbols and artifacts of tradition into their own lives with a questioning and interpreting attitude
  • Invite learners to come to know for themselves the wisdom, knowledge, or beauty, of the tradition
  • Allow for the occasion for moral discourse and provide access to models of responding to the moral questions raised by the study of the past
  • Invite learners into a critical assessment of experience so they may discern what is life-giving and life-enhancing
  • Celebrate the hope that comes with recognizing God’s continuing action in the life of the community

How can tradition be life-giving in Catholic education?

Directions:

  1. Use Google images, to search for artist’s portrayals of Jesus.
  2. Pick out the  artist’s picture that  BEST portrays the Jesus as you believe he was.  COPY  the image and place it into a word document. Write a brief explanation indicating what it is in the picture that reveals the “real” Jesus to you.
  3. Pick out the  artist’s picture that  LEAST portrays the Jesus as you believe he was.  COPY  the image and place it into a word document. Write a brief explanation indicating what it is in the picture that least reveals the “real” Jesus to you.

Examples

This image best portrays Jesus because he is laughing. The bible says Jesus was loving person. In John 13:35, it says, By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.’ Disciples follow their leader, so Jesus must have been loving. Disciples wanted to be with Jesus, and they won’t want to be with someone who is unhappy, sad or angry.  Therefore, for me, loving people to me are joyous and happy people.

 

 

 

 

 

This image least portrays Jesus because he is angry. Rarely does the bible ever speak of Jesus being angry. The only example that I know of  was when Jesus cleared the temple of the moneychangers and animal-sellers.   Loving people are rarely angry. For me, loving people, such as Jesus, are joyous and happy people.  They are not angry people.

 

 

 

 

 

 

After viewing the film Glory Road write a 5 paragraph essay response to the question: What Does It Take to Change the World?

Pick and choose from the following six ideas to develop your own thesis and topic sentences. In your essay refer to specific detail from the film, your own experiences, and passages from Scripture to develop your response to the question: What Does It Take to Change the World?

One: Recruiting Strategies
(read Luke 14:15-24; 1 Corinthians 1:24-31; and John 3:16-18; John 1:12-13)

  • How does Coach Haskins change his recruiting methods after the traditional methods fail?
    In school, when a team “captain” was choosing up sides for a team — what determined if someone got picked or not?
  • Have you ever wanted to be part of something — knowing you could do well — only to be rejected? Or have you ever rejected someone because of their race, the way they talked, the clothes they wore, or where they lived? Describe your experience.
  • When Paul comments about “the wise” who do you think he is talking about? Who would represent the “wise” in Glory Road?
  • What kind of people does God “recruit?”
  • What does God use as His standard for who makes the team?

Two: Good Players Need Good Coaching
(read 1 Corinthians 12:12-27; 2 Timothy 2:2-7)

  • Name some of the behaviors that players on the Texas Western team had to overcome in order to become winners.
  • What kinds of things did Coach Haskins do to discipline his team so that they would work together?
  • What does the Bible say about why some people might not work well together?
  • Name some roles Christians play in changing the world for Christ.
  • Describe a coaching or mentoring relationship you have or had in school. What effect did the coaching have on your performance? What characteristics did you most appreciate in the person who was helping you?
  • What does Timothy — and the rest of us — learn about playing on God’s team from each of the examples that Paul uses?
  • Where should we go to find out what we should do, what the rules are, and how to work hard?
  • Once we have learned how to change the world for Christ, what does Paul say we should do with that knowledge?

Three: Great Players Persevere
(read 1 Peter 5:8; 1 Peter 4:12-19; James 1:2-3, 12 and Romans 5:1-5)

  • What were some of the responses people had when the Texas Western team began to win — especially when they began to beat highly-ranked teams?
  • Once things got really bad, what happened to the team?
  • How was their internal conflict demonstrated outwardly?
  • Who is one of our opponents?
  • Why shouldn’t we be surprised that we face opposition?
  • What does it mean to be reviled?
  • What do James and Paul say we should do in the face of difficult opposition?
  • What is the end result of endurance and perseverance?

Four: Players Don’t Stand Alone
(read Romans 12:4-13, Philippians 2:1-11 and Hebrews 10:23-25)

  • When Coach Haskins announces his decision to his team — what is their response?
  • Some of the white players would never again get a chance to play in a championship tournament, so why do you think they agreed to sit out the game?
  • What lines of support did you see develop that helped Texas Western to prevail? According to the Bible, what are some ways we can show support for one another?
  • How does meeting together regularly contribute to the support of all members?

Five: All Players Triumph through Belief and Action
(read James 2:14-26)

  • What obstacles have you overcome in your life?
  • Can you give some examples of how action confirms belief?
  • What kind of actions can you take that will lead others to Jesus and help to change the world for Christ

Six: Go Play to Win!
(read 1 Corinthians 9:25-27)

  • What one thing will you change about yourself this week to help win the world for Christ?
  • What one thing will you commit yourself to do for someone else in this room to help them in their faith
  • Discuss what you can do to reach out to others and help them to join God’s team.

NRSV translation of the related Scriptures from http://bible.oremus.org/:
James 2:1-10
Luke 14:15-24
1 Corinthians 1:24-31
John 3:16-18
John 1:12-13
1 Corinthians 12:12-27
2 Timothy 2:2-7
1 Peter 5:8
1 Peter 4:12-19
James 1:2-3
James 1:12
Romans 5:1-5
Romans 12:4-13
Philippians 2:1-11
Hebrews 10:23-25
James 2:14-26
1 Corinthians 9:25-27

Directions:  What follows in bold is the verses from a parable found in Matthew 21:28-31.  Under each verse are some questions which are intended to help you understand the parable’s message and to relate it to your world today.  Address the questions that follow.

Activity one: The Kingdom of Heaven (Matthew 13:44)

“The kingdom of heaven [God] is like treasure hidden in a field…”

Name those things that you consider “treasure” — those things you would truly long to have.

“which someone found and hid…”

What would be an example of something so wonderful; so desirable; so valuable that someone would want to hide it from everyone else?

“Then in his [her] joy…”

What would truly bring you joy, happiness and fulfillment in your life?  Be honest!  Explain why this would bring you the happiness that you think it will.  Does it bring happiness to others who have it?

“He [she] goes and sells all that he [she] has and buys that field”

Would you be willing to give up absolutely everything (all possessions) for something that would bring you true happiness?  Is this a radical thing to do?

Activity Two: Parable of the Two Sons (Matt 21:28-31)

“A man had two sons; he went to the first and said, ‘Son, go and work in the vineyard today’…”

Name some of the responsibilities you have been given by your parents.  As a person raised a Christian, what responsibility have you been given?

“He answered, ‘I will not’…”

Have you ever blatantly refused to do something that your Mom or Dad asked you to do?  Why did you refuse?   Have you refused to do what your faith asks of you?

“but later he changed his mind and went…”

Have you ever blatantly refused to do something that your Mom or Dad or your faith asked you to do and then changed your mind?  What made you change your mind?  How did you feel because of it?

“The father went to the second [son] and said the same; and he answered, ‘I go, sir’; but he did not go”

Have you ever told your Mom or Dad that you would do something that asked you to do when you knew you had no intentions of doing it?  Why would you say you would do something when you knew you would not?  Did your decision make you feel guilty?  Why or why not?

“Which of the two [sons] did the will of his father?”

Which of the two sons did the will of his father?  How would you answer this question?  Which of the sons would your parents approve of most?

Which son did the right thing?  Explain your answer.

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