Posts tagged ‘prejudice’

Theme 1: What keeps us apart?

Outcomes
Students will

  • identify and analyze examples of prejudice
  • suggest ways that they could respond with compassion to situations of injustice
  • demonstrate an understanding of how responding with com- passion leads to peace

Key Concepts

  • Christian justice is rooted in love. It is based not only on fairness, but also on mercy and compassion.
  • Compassion is the ability to feel and act with and for another. It is not pity.
  • Respect for the human person considers the other “another self.” It presupposes respect for the fundamental rights that flow from the dignity intrinsic to the person. (CCC #1944)
  • Peace is the fruit of justice.
  • “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled” (Matthew 5.6).

Theme 2: How much is enough?

Outcomes
Students will

  • identify social justice issues
  • perceive the challenge of God’s preferential option for the poor
  • use the preferential option for the poor as the criterion for analyzing social injustice issues
  • acknowledge that the love of God for all people demands justice

Key Concepts

  • “Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness’ sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven” (Matthew 5.10).
  • “Blessed are you who are poor, for yours is the kingdom of God” (Luke 6.20).
  • As Christians we are called to see that a wide variety of issues are issues of justice: for example, poverty, unjust labour practices, immigration, refugees, ecology, unemployment, consumer justice, land use.
  • Christian justice challenges individuals and society to work for the kingdom of God. Promoting justice is not an option for Christians – it is an integral part of our mission.
  • The Church informs our judgment of social justice issues.
  • Christians are called to respond to God’s love by making changes to address injustice in the world.
  • The preferential option for the poor colours the Christian understanding of justice.

Theme 3: How can the earth survive?

Outcomes
Students will

  • define justice in terms of respect for the integrity and balance of creation
  • explain how justice is a demand of natural law
  • evaluate their lifestyle in terms of its ecological impact
  • identify the correlation between their relationship with God and their relationship with others and the earth

Key Concepts

  • “Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth” (Matthew 5.5).
  • Justice is both a demand and an outcome of natural law.
  • The earth is ultimately a common heritage, the fruits of which are for the benefit of all.
  • Modern society will find no solution to the ecological problem unless it takes a serious look at its lifestyle.
  • Contact with nature has deep restorative power that can impart peace and serenity.
  • The commitment of believers to a healthy environment for everyone stems directly from their belief in God the creator.
  • Humanity’s dominion over inanimate and other living beings granted by the Creator is not absolute; it is limited by concern for the quality of life of one’s neighbour, including generations to come; it requires a religious respect for the integrity of creation (CCC # 2415).

Confession Bible Quotes
• James 5:16
• Acts 19:18
• Matthew 3:5-6
• Mark 1:5
• 1 Timothy 6:12
• 1 John 1:9
• Numbers 5:6-7
• Nehemiah 9:2
• Sirach 4:26

Grave sins must be confessed once per year.
Venial sins are “recommended” for confession.

CHAPTER III : THE PENITENT

Can. 987 In order that the faithful may receive the saving remedy of the sacrament of penance, they must be so disposed that, repudiating the sins they have committed and having the purpose of amending their lives, they turn back to God.

Can. 988 §1 The faithful are bound to confess, in kind and in number, all grave sins committed after baptism, of which after careful examination of conscience they are aware, which have not yet been directly pardoned by the keys of the Church, and which have not been confessed in an individual confession.

§2 The faithful are recommended to confess also venial sins.

Can. 989 All the faithful who have reached the age of discretion are bound faithfully to confess their grave sins at least once a year.

Can. 990 No one is forbidden to confess through an interpreter, provided however that abuse and scandal are avoided, and without prejudice to the provision of can. 983 §2.

Can. 991 All Christ’s faithful are free to confess their sins to lawfully approved confessors of their own choice, even to one of another rite.

“Catechism of the Catholic Church”. 2000.
Grave Sin
`CCC 2272
`CCC 2480
`CCC 2380
`CCC 2148
`CCC 2434
`CCC 2181
`CCC 2117
`CCC 2384
`CCC 2385
`CCC 2386
`CCC 2290
`CCC 2291
`CCC 2539
`CCC 2277
`CCC 2302
`CCC 2152
`CCC 2476
`CCC 2353
`CCC 2303
`CCC 2357
`CCC 2388
`CCC 2482
`CCC 2352
`CCC 2268
`CCC 2163
`CCC 2354
`CCC 2355
`CCC 2356
`CCC 2439
`CCC 2120
`CCC 2284
`CCC 2281
`CCC 2297
`CCC 2413
`CCC 2434
`CCC 2268
`CCC 2400
`CCC 2434

Venial Sin
`CCC 1863

Penance
`CCC 1422

The Gravity of Sin: Mortal and Venial
`CCC 1854-1864

Introduction:

Read  Unequal Access: Canadian Race Relations

Canadians tend to think that racism is more prevalent in the United States, but not so much in Canada.  The above report seems to say otherwise.

Questions:  (answer three of the following)

  1. What is your reaction to the above information?  Did anything surprise you?  If so, what?  If not, why not?  Do you agree with the information presented in the report?  Take a position on the report (believability, reliability, etc) and provide support for your position from your experiences or research.  If you do not deem these statistics convincing and valid, then what other explanation is there besides racism that might explain the information provided in the report?
  2. Read Galatians 3:26 – 28 and Matthew 20:1-16. You can use oremus Bible Browser to help you.   Explain what implications these texts have regarding racism.  Explain how the statistics reported in the above article Canadian Race Relations might change if these scripture texts were taken seriously.
  3. What can the story of the 1971 Titans teach us about our world today, especially in relation to race relations in the wake of 9/11 or even more recently the ISIS (ISIL) threat?  Since the events of 2001, does our country treat Muslims according to Christians values?  Read the article CBC Discrimination poll to find out how Muslims are treated in Canada.
  4. Gerry Bertier tells Julius in the hospital after being in a car accident, “I was afraid of you, Julius. I don’t understand what I was afraid of. Now I only know I was only hating my brother.“ Does prejudice stem from fear? Explain your response providing evidence.  Is racism and/or  prejudice and/or bigotry a learned behavior?  Explain your response providing evidence from personal experience or from research.  Here is an interesting article (Children learn attitudes about race at home) about racism as a learned behaviour.
  5. At the beginning of the film, before training camp, we hear the line; “He’s just another blessed child in God’s loving family.” At the end of the film, we are told to “Trust the soul of a man, not his look.” Both of these are good sentiments, if they are spoken with sincerity. However, in the film, the first is spoken sarcastically.   Even though it is spoken using sarcasm, is this a truth according to Galatians 3:26 – 28 and Romans 8:14? You can use oremus Bible Browser to help you find out. What exactly does, “Trust the soul of a man, not his look”, mean?  Explain.

The rubric titled Movie Study Assignment Rubric located on the pages at the left will be used to grade this assignment.

 

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