Posts tagged ‘Romans’

Skim these Scripture passages. Pick one that appeals to you and

  1. summarize its main point,
  2. tell how it relates to the theme “Understanding Conscience”,
  3. list one or two thoughts that entered your mind when you read it.

When we get caught up in our own interests and concerns, we no longer have room in our hearts for others, no place for the poor. We forget the quiet joy of God’s love. – Pope Francis

Read Romans 12:15-16

Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep. Live in harmony with one another; do not be haughty, but associate with the lowly; do not claim to be wiser than you are.

http://bible.oremus.org/?ql=402728180

Prayer
O beloved God, If I have closed my heart to you, please open it wide that I might reach out beyond my own interests and concerns to be aware of the needs of others, especially the poor. Your Son Jesus become one with all those who have little of this world’s goods, and he proclaimed your kingdom to them first of all. Make my heart like his, dear God.
Amen.

Practice
Today I will think about Pope Francis’ words and try to let them into my heart.

  1. Why do you think the film is titled Where Hope Grows? What changes do you see in Calvin, Milt, Colt, Katie and the other characters throughout the film? Discuss how you see the growth of hope throughout the story. Who or what is the source of hope?
  2. How does Calvin’s relationship with Produce help him make changes in his life? In his relationship with his daughter, Katie?
  3. How can we work together to create an inclusive community for people with disabilities?
  4. Where can the conversation go from here? How will you be accountable to yourself, your family and friends, your school, and your community?
  5. Have you ever witnessed someone showing disrespect to a person with a disability? How did you respond? How would you respond after watching the film?
  6. Why do one-to-one friendships matter?
  7. Why do you think Calvin initially befriends Produce? What are his motives—good and bad—that prompt him to spend more time with Produce?
  8. Describe Katie and Colt’s relationship. Why do you think Colt continues to spend time with Katie? Why do you think Katie keeps hanging out with Colt?
  9. Calvin finally chooses to give up alcohol and attend his first Alcoholics Anonymous meeting. What situation prompts him to repent? Why does it seem to take “hitting bottom” for people to choose to turn their lives around?
  10. At the hospital, Katie and Calvin pray for Produce and Milt. Katie asks Calvin, “What good is it to pray if you don’t get what you ask for?” How does Calvin answer her question, and would you be satisfied with his answer? How would you answer the question? What do you think is the purpose of prayer?
  11. At a funeral service, the pastor says to “make your dash count,” to live your life to the fullest. Who is someone you know who is making their dash count? How can you tell? What are key elements needed to live a full life? What are the dangers or costs of not “making your dash count?” Who makes their dash count in the film?
  12. Who or what “saves” Calvin? What relationships bring about his transformation, and what realizations does he make in order to grow?
  13. What do you think will happen with each of the characters beyond the end of the movie? Imagine and describe a future for Calvin, Katie, Produce, Amy, and Colt—what will the next year hold for them?
  14. Which character did you relate with the most—Produce, Calvin, Katie, or another character? Why do you think you felt a connection with that character? Which character did you dislike the most? What bothered you about them?
  15. Who are some people with special needs in your life? What have you learned about life and about yourself from knowing this person?
  16. Calvin and Katie have a strained relationship at the beginning of the movie. What are some of the sources of their tension or the obstacles that prevent them from a healthier relationship? Describe how Calvin might be frustrated with Katie, then describe how Katie might be frustrated with Calvin.
  17. In a key scene, an embarrassed Katie must pick up a drunken Calvin from the police station. She tells him “I’ve given up on you.” What would you want to say to Calvin in this moment? What would you say to Katie?
  18. Produce was a voice of hope for Calvin. We are all looking for some reason to have hope, to have a reason to keep going, to see that we have a sense of purpose and destiny, a reason to see what our future holds. How can you be a voice of hope in our world?
  19. Romans 5:3-5
  20. 1Corinthians 12:14-20, 27
  21. Are there people with special needs in your life? What have you learned about life and about yourself from knowing this person? How does your school welcome and serve people with special needs? Your friends? Your neighbourhood? Your community? This question presents an excellent opportunity to talk about inclusion with your students. In particular, you may want to raise the concept of social inclusion and what it means to ensure all members of a school or community are meaningfully engaged as part of the group, form positive, mutually beneficial relationships, and are viewed as equal, contributing members of the group. Some additional questions to ponder with your students might include: What does it feel like to be excluded? What are some ways we unintentionally exclude certain people or make them feel unwelcome? What steps can we take to make sure we create an inclusive community?https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=-cA3t1HW1Ow
  22. Luke 14:15-24 If Jesus pushed the disciples to go out and invite people with disabilities to the table, what would it look like for us to do the same?
  23. Mark 12:41-43
  24. According to the World Health Organization (2011), more than one billion people around the world have a disability(1 in 7). 20 percent of the teen population has a disability. 70 million people in the world need wheelchairs and only 5-15% have them.
    http://www.who.int/disabilities/infographic/en/
    http://www.who.int/features/qa/67/en/

    Click to access chapter1.pdf


    https://www.younglife.org/en/Pages/default.aspx
Theme 1: What is love?

Outcomes
Students will

  • examine and evaluate their understanding of love
  • analyze Scripture pas- sages where Christ models love
  • explore the Christian dimensions of love within the context of popular notions of love
  • analyze ways they love others because they love themselves
  • articulate what it means to be loved and to love unconditionally
  • listen prayerfully to the call to be loving

Key Concepts

  • We are called to love as Jesus loved.(Since we have been loved, we also must love – 1 John 4.10- 12.)
  • Love that is rooted in Christ will never fail, even when it seems to be the most foolish, unreasonable or diffi- cult choice.
  • Love is not just an emotion. Love is willed. Mature love is a call to action which fosters the good of others.
  • Giving and receiving love is the most important dimension of our lives, bringing out the best in both the lover and the beloved.
  • To truly love others, we must love our- selves.

Theme 2: What is the loving thing to do?

Outcomes
Students will

  • reviewandapplythe decision-making model (see, judge, act, evaluate)
  • demonstrate an understanding of the role of the magisteri- um, Scripture and tra- dition in moral deci- sion making
  • identify times when it may be difficult to do what is loving
  • define conscience and name its role in moral decision making
  • explain the relation- ship between Christian moral deci- sion making and love

Key Concepts

  • Christian moral deci- sion making is based on love.
  • People are bound by their conscience in determining the loving thing to do.
  • The magisterium, Scripture and tradition guide Catholics in moral decision making.
  • Doing the loving thing may mean doing what is difficult or unpopular.

Theme 3: Why wait?

Outcomes
Students will

  • explain how our sexuality can help us to love
  • identify acceptable Christian expressions of love
  • explain why having sex is not the loving thing to do outside of marriage
  • define chastity and understand why it is a Christian virtue
  • analyze sexual issues in relation to the virtue of chastity

Key Concepts

  • “All Christ’s faithful are called to lead a chaste life in keeping with their particular states of life” (CCC #2348).
  • “Chastity includes an apprenticeship in self- mastery which is a training in human freedom” (CCC #2339).
  • God created us as sexual beings. Our sexuality draws us out of our- selves to relate with others.
  • Genital sexual expression becomes personal and truly human when it is integrated into the relationship of one per- son to another, in the complete and lifelong mutual gift of a man and a woman. (see CCC #2337)
  • Sexual feelings are neither good nor bad in themselves; they sim- ply are.
  • There are many chaste ways of expressing our love for others.
  • The sixth commandment protects the sacred bonds of committed love.

Theme 4: How does love go wrong?

Outcomes
Students will

  • use 1 Corinthians 13.4-8a for identifying the signs of manipulative, coercive and abusive behaviour in relationships
  • value the basic dignity of every person within relationships
  • understand and demonstrate skills of appropriate assertive behaviour
  • use Scripture for developing Christian attitudes towards loving others

Key Concepts

  • “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God” (Matthew 5.9).
  • In Scripture we find direction and inspiration for healthy, lov- ing relationships. (e.g., 1 Corinthians 13.4-8a, Romans 13.10)
  • People in healthy relationships recognize the equal dignity and basic rights of all involved.
  • Love goes wrong when it becomes self- centred.
  • Not all relationships are healthy. Manipulation, coercion and abuse are signs of unhealthy relationships.
  • Assertiveness skills are necessary for developing and maintaining healthy relationships.
Survey:

Bible Readings:

Skim these Scripture passages. Pick one that appeals to you and

  1. summarize its main point,
  2. tell how it relates to the theme “Understanding Conscience”,
  3. list one or two thoughts that entered your mind when you read it.

Reflect:

The reflection will take effort, but it is an effort to focus – for yourself – an ego-conscience. If that’s not worth the effort, you will always have a personality, but it is unlikely you will ever develop character.

Draw a line down the center of a piece of paper. On one side of the line, list the do’s and don’ts your parents, teachers, and media (other external forces) have taped on your Superego that you have already checked against reality and find are now wrong – or at least far too simplified. On the other side, write the elements of your Superego that you now see for yourself are valid.

Quotable Quotes:

“Faith, hope, and love; and the greatest of these is love.” – 1 Corinthians 13:11-13

“The more a correct conscience prevails, the more do persons and groups turn aside from blind choice and try to be guided by the objective standards of moral conduct.” – The Church in the Modern World, 16

“Return to the root and you will find the meaning.” – Sengstan

“A man’s action is only a picture book of his creed.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Rather fail with honour than succeed by fraud.” – Sophocles

“In matters of conscience, the law of the majority has no place.” – Mohandas Gandhi

Activity:

Choose:

  1. Roughly how many of your peers do you guess cheat routinely on homework, quizzes, and tests? What are the reasons most would give for doing that? Why is “Well, everybody does it” not a legitimate excuse? If trust and honesty are the glue that holds together the web of our human ecology, what is the effect of widespread cheating on the web of society?
  2. When schools discover that a great deal of cheating is going on, the administration frequently will encourage teachers and exam supervisors to have greater vigilance and require strong punishment when someone is caught cheating. Similarly, with the increase of crime in our cities, the almost automatic response is to call for an increase in the number of police. What would be a better way to attack the problems of cheating and crime at their roots?
Yes, these files are free to download and use for your Bible study. These are provided as a supplement to the Ignatius Catholic Study Bible: New Testament.

After viewing the film Glory Road write a 5 paragraph essay response to the question: What Does It Take to Change the World?

Pick and choose from the following six ideas to develop your own thesis and topic sentences. In your essay refer to specific detail from the film, your own experiences, and passages from Scripture to develop your response to the question: What Does It Take to Change the World?

One: Recruiting Strategies
(read Luke 14:15-24; 1 Corinthians 1:24-31; and John 3:16-18; John 1:12-13)

  • How does Coach Haskins change his recruiting methods after the traditional methods fail?
    In school, when a team “captain” was choosing up sides for a team — what determined if someone got picked or not?
  • Have you ever wanted to be part of something — knowing you could do well — only to be rejected? Or have you ever rejected someone because of their race, the way they talked, the clothes they wore, or where they lived? Describe your experience.
  • When Paul comments about “the wise” who do you think he is talking about? Who would represent the “wise” in Glory Road?
  • What kind of people does God “recruit?”
  • What does God use as His standard for who makes the team?

Two: Good Players Need Good Coaching
(read 1 Corinthians 12:12-27; 2 Timothy 2:2-7)

  • Name some of the behaviors that players on the Texas Western team had to overcome in order to become winners.
  • What kinds of things did Coach Haskins do to discipline his team so that they would work together?
  • What does the Bible say about why some people might not work well together?
  • Name some roles Christians play in changing the world for Christ.
  • Describe a coaching or mentoring relationship you have or had in school. What effect did the coaching have on your performance? What characteristics did you most appreciate in the person who was helping you?
  • What does Timothy — and the rest of us — learn about playing on God’s team from each of the examples that Paul uses?
  • Where should we go to find out what we should do, what the rules are, and how to work hard?
  • Once we have learned how to change the world for Christ, what does Paul say we should do with that knowledge?

Three: Great Players Persevere
(read 1 Peter 5:8; 1 Peter 4:12-19; James 1:2-3, 12 and Romans 5:1-5)

  • What were some of the responses people had when the Texas Western team began to win — especially when they began to beat highly-ranked teams?
  • Once things got really bad, what happened to the team?
  • How was their internal conflict demonstrated outwardly?
  • Who is one of our opponents?
  • Why shouldn’t we be surprised that we face opposition?
  • What does it mean to be reviled?
  • What do James and Paul say we should do in the face of difficult opposition?
  • What is the end result of endurance and perseverance?

Four: Players Don’t Stand Alone
(read Romans 12:4-13, Philippians 2:1-11 and Hebrews 10:23-25)

  • When Coach Haskins announces his decision to his team — what is their response?
  • Some of the white players would never again get a chance to play in a championship tournament, so why do you think they agreed to sit out the game?
  • What lines of support did you see develop that helped Texas Western to prevail? According to the Bible, what are some ways we can show support for one another?
  • How does meeting together regularly contribute to the support of all members?

Five: All Players Triumph through Belief and Action
(read James 2:14-26)

  • What obstacles have you overcome in your life?
  • Can you give some examples of how action confirms belief?
  • What kind of actions can you take that will lead others to Jesus and help to change the world for Christ

Six: Go Play to Win!
(read 1 Corinthians 9:25-27)

  • What one thing will you change about yourself this week to help win the world for Christ?
  • What one thing will you commit yourself to do for someone else in this room to help them in their faith
  • Discuss what you can do to reach out to others and help them to join God’s team.

NRSV translation of the related Scriptures from http://bible.oremus.org/:
James 2:1-10
Luke 14:15-24
1 Corinthians 1:24-31
John 3:16-18
John 1:12-13
1 Corinthians 12:12-27
2 Timothy 2:2-7
1 Peter 5:8
1 Peter 4:12-19
James 1:2-3
James 1:12
Romans 5:1-5
Romans 12:4-13
Philippians 2:1-11
Hebrews 10:23-25
James 2:14-26
1 Corinthians 9:25-27

“The Spirit of God dwells in you.” – Romans 8:9

  1. In this time of Thanksgiving, what beauty do I see within and around me?
  2. How does this invite me to give thanks to God in worship, service, and life?
  3. What challenge do I face in my daily life that can dim my spirit?
  4. “Whatever does not bring you more joy or make you more alive is too small for you.” What does this statement mean to me?

“Every part of the earth is sacred. Whatever befalls the earth, befalls the sons and daughters of the earth. All things are connected.” – Chief Seattle

Introduction:

Read  Unequal Access: Canadian Race Relations

Canadians tend to think that racism is more prevalent in the United States, but not so much in Canada.  The above report seems to say otherwise.

Questions:  (answer three of the following)

  1. What is your reaction to the above information?  Did anything surprise you?  If so, what?  If not, why not?  Do you agree with the information presented in the report?  Take a position on the report (believability, reliability, etc) and provide support for your position from your experiences or research.  If you do not deem these statistics convincing and valid, then what other explanation is there besides racism that might explain the information provided in the report?
  2. Read Galatians 3:26 – 28 and Matthew 20:1-16. You can use oremus Bible Browser to help you.   Explain what implications these texts have regarding racism.  Explain how the statistics reported in the above article Canadian Race Relations might change if these scripture texts were taken seriously.
  3. What can the story of the 1971 Titans teach us about our world today, especially in relation to race relations in the wake of 9/11 or even more recently the ISIS (ISIL) threat?  Since the events of 2001, does our country treat Muslims according to Christians values?  Read the article CBC Discrimination poll to find out how Muslims are treated in Canada.
  4. Gerry Bertier tells Julius in the hospital after being in a car accident, “I was afraid of you, Julius. I don’t understand what I was afraid of. Now I only know I was only hating my brother.“ Does prejudice stem from fear? Explain your response providing evidence.  Is racism and/or  prejudice and/or bigotry a learned behavior?  Explain your response providing evidence from personal experience or from research.  Here is an interesting article (Children learn attitudes about race at home) about racism as a learned behaviour.
  5. At the beginning of the film, before training camp, we hear the line; “He’s just another blessed child in God’s loving family.” At the end of the film, we are told to “Trust the soul of a man, not his look.” Both of these are good sentiments, if they are spoken with sincerity. However, in the film, the first is spoken sarcastically.   Even though it is spoken using sarcasm, is this a truth according to Galatians 3:26 – 28 and Romans 8:14? You can use oremus Bible Browser to help you find out. What exactly does, “Trust the soul of a man, not his look”, mean?  Explain.

The rubric titled Movie Study Assignment Rubric located on the pages at the left will be used to grade this assignment.

 

The history of the Jews goes back thousands of years. Below are some important evens in the first thousand years of the Common Era. Use your knowledge of Judaism, and the history of the region to determine their correct order. Number them 1-8, with 1 as the earliest event.

a. After the Jewish expulsion from Jerusalem by the Romans, Jewish oral law is written down in a book called the Mishnah.
b. Jews in the Roman Empire are repressed.
c. The Romans reconquer Jerusalem and destroy the Temple.
d. The Muslim Empire expands to cover southwestern Asia, northern Aftrica, and Spain
e. Jews rebel against Roman rule and seize Jerusalem.
f. The Jews begin to scatter around the world.
g. Christianity becomes the primary religion of the Roman Empire.
h. The Romans crush the rebellion and prohibit Jews from living in Jerusalem.

Skip to toolbar