Eating Noises

I knew a man who went into a rage if anybody ate an apple within his hearing. I knew another man who was so disgusted by his son’s eating habits that he made him eat his dinner alone. Do you have such quirks about other people’s eating habits as you encounter them in restaurants and other public places? Write an essay about people with such habits. Describe your responses to them.

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On the Sidewalk Bleeding

Read “On the Sidewalk Bleeding” by Evan Hunter

Respond to the following questions on the various aspects of the story:

  1. Who is the protagonist?
  2. What is/are the conflict(s)?
  3. The conflict is developed through the use of names that apply to the boy: Andy and a Royal. Skim the story to note how the names appear in critical places. What do these names represent?
  4. What effect does Andy’s jacket have on the people who find him in the alley?
  5. What are the reasons why these people do not help Andy?
  6. At what point does Andy realize he is dying?
  7. What does Andy do with the last of his strength? How is this important to the theme and to the outcome of the conflict?
  8. What is the climax or turning point? Sketch a Plot Diagram. Try this Plot Diagram Generator or find another.

    Create a Plot Diagram

    Create a Plot Diagram


    Plot Diagram created with Gliffy Diagrams from Chrome Webstore

    Plot Diagram created with Gliffy Diagrams from Chrome Webstore

  9. What is the police officer’s reaction to Andy? How does this contribute to the author’s message?

Assessment Activity: Who Am I?

Consider an essay planning map for this expository writing task

Consider an essay planning map for this expository writing task

Consider your own identity: who are you, what makes you unique, how do others see you, what do you want others to know and see about you. Write a post in your blog that represents yourself: embed visual elements and/or other suitable medium.

You may wish to include some of the following elements:

  • a personal motto or saying
  • a symbol that represents something about you
  • your attitudes about yourself
  • your strengths and talents
  • your hopes and dreams for the future
  • what you most like about yourself
  • what you are working on improving about yourself (with a positive focus) not what you dislike about yourself

Focus on the positive and create a post that makes you feel good about yourself while showing others all that is good about you.

Spend time reviewing the criteria from the assessment rubric.

Blog Post Rubric

Blog Post Rubric

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Seasons

For many of us the seasons are changing, bouncing unpredictably between cold and warm. Are you glad to be moving into a new season, or wishing for one more week of the old?

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Wordle: Decisions

a Wordle created with a Mac or PC

a Wordle created with a Mac or PC

a Togul created with a Chromebook

a Togul created with a Chromebook

Search the net for a few quotes about decisions. Recall these focus questions to help you in your search.

Collect a handful of phrases that give you pause to think. Avoid anonymous quotes, note the author. (Keep the unharmed list safe in your notes somewhere.)

Go to wordle.net (on Chromebooks try tagul clouds while logged in with a google account) and and blast one, or some, or a whole pile into your own “wordle”. Try several attempts till you have something rich in thought, an inspiration to a deep thinker like yourself.

When you have a “wordle” you like, take a screen capture of it (Mac: command+shift+4 or Windows: Print Screen key) and upload the “png” to your blog and ….

Write a creative narrative (a short short story of about 500 words) that develops an idea about decisions inspired from your “wordle“.

Warning: the ideas you spawn from generators like these should be used with caution, seriously.

Story Idea Generator

Story Idea Generator (tv tropes)

How to Write a Short Story

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Crossword Puzzle: “Who Am I?”

Create a “Who Am I?” crossword puzzle for your group/class.

  • get every person’s name to fit somewhere
  • get at least one descriptive adverb or adjective for each person in the group
  • get at least one favorite activity listed for each person

Example clues:
Across:

  1. a friendly boy, when he’s not playing basketball
  2. Bob’s favorite sport

Use the following, or similar, crossword puzzle maker.

Attach a printable image(jpg or png) of your completed puzzle to a post in your blog.

crossword

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Comparison and Contrast

Compare and/or contrast one of the following pairs. (See also the guidelines that follow.)
1. A newborn and an elderly person
2. Front-wheel-drive and rear-wheel-drive cars
3. The newspaper and the TV newcast
4. Cats and dogs
5. Renting and owning your home
6. Using credit and using cash
7. Touring bikes and mountain bikes
8. The novel and the short story
9. Any two martial arts
10. The classical music fan and the rock music fan
11. A Canadian city and an American city of the same size
12. A wedding and a funeral
13. Writing on paper and using a word processor
14. Natural and synthetic fabrics
15. The authoritarian parent and the permissive parent
16. Luxury cars and economy cars
17. Speaking and writing
18. Community college and university
19. The analogue watch and the digital watch
20. A team sport and an individual sport
21. Sales tax and income tax
22. Glasses and contact lenses
23. Driving a motorcycle and driving a car
24. Two newspapers(news channels or news sites) that you know
25. Large families and small families

Process in Writing: Guidelines
Follow at least some of these steps in writing your essay of comparison and contrast.

1. Spend enough time with the topic list to choose the item that best fits your interest and experience.

2. Draw a line down the middle of a blank page. Now brainstorm: jot down notes for subject “A” on the lefl and for subject “B” on the right. Join related items with lines, then take stock of what you have: Is A better than B? Is it worse? Similar? Opposite? Or what? Express their relationship to each other in a thesis statement.

3. Now choose either “halves” or “separate points” to organize your argument, depending on the nature and size of your subject, then work your notes into a brief outline.

4. Write a rapid first draft, leave extra white space, not stopping now to revise or edit.

5. Later analyze what you have produced. Does it follow your outline? If not, is the new material off-topic, or is it a worthwhile addition, an example of “thinking in writing”? Revise accordingly.

6. In your second draft cut all deadwood. Sharpen word choice. Add any missing examples. Strengthen TRANSITIONS.

7. Test your prose aloud before writing the good copy. Save the essay in case your teacher suggests further revision.

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Create a Visual of Your Favorite Poems

Create a visual (canva or prezi) that captures the essence of some (3-5) of your favorite poems. Your work should contain appropriate visuals, brief quotations from the poem, and personal commentary that reflects your own perspective.

Use poems you’ve already studied, or discover more from poets.org:

Breakups and Heartbreak: Poems for Teens

Family: Poems for Teens

Gender and Sexuality: Poems for Teens

Grief and Loss: Poems for Teens

Heritage and Identity: Poems for Teens

Love and Relationships: Poems for Teens

Mental Health: Poems for Teens

Politics and Social Justice: Poems for Teens

Self: Poems for Teens

 

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National News

Spend a week carefully observing news stories covered by the televised CBC news The National (10 or 11 p.m.) and the print daily newspaper The National Post.

Which stories were covered on TV, which significant stories were only in the newspaper? Which medium provided the deepest and most thorough coverage of particular events?

Write a post about your comparison and conclusions.

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Could It Be Love?

The two following poems express different attitudes toward love. The first poem, “How do I Love Thee?,” was written in the nineteenth century and the second one, “First Person Demonstrative” was written in the twentieth century.

"How do I love thee?" by Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861)
How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday's
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with a passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints, --- I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life! --- and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.
"First Person Demonstrative" by Phyllis Gotlieb (1926-2009)
I'd rather
heave half a brick than say
I love you, though I do
I'd rather
crawl in a hole than call you
darling, though you are
I'd rather
wrench off an arm than hug you though
it's what I long to do
I'd rather
gather a posy of poison ivy than
ask if you love me

so if my
hair doesn't stand on end it's because
I never tease it
and if my
heart isn't in my mouth it's because
it knows its place
and if I
don't take a bite of your ear it's because
gristle gripes my guts
and if you
miss the message better get new
glasses and read it twice
  1. How did you feel after reading “How Do I Love Thee?” How did you feel after reading “First Person Demonstrative”? Which poem do you like better? Why? Which do you think is the more appealing poem?
  2. Compare the thoughts and feelings of the two poets. How do the poems differ? How are they similar? Does this comparison change your feelings toward either of the poems?
Picasso: The Two Saltimbanques

Picasso: The Two Saltimbanques

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Survival in Film: Fact or Fiction

Numerous movies have been made about surviving physical ordeals. Sometimes these are biographical accounts of a situation; often they are fictionalized versions of an original story and sometimes they are just pure fiction.

Make a list of movies dealing with physical survival. Are they fact or fiction, or a mixture of both? Decide on at least two you want to see and view them. Does it make any difference to you whether survival stories are based on real events? Why?

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Three Parts

Draft a post with three parts, each unrelated to the another, but create a common thread between them by including the same item – an object, a symbol, a place – in each part.

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