Do’s and Don’ts

Most of us have had, or will have, reason to confront another person and express a lot of anger that we have been storing up. In your blog make a list of “do’s” and “don’ts” about this type of confrontation. Then think of a confrontation you have already experienced. How many of your “do’s” and “don’ts” did you follow? If a similar situation were to occur, how would you handle it this time?

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Classification

Develop one of the following topics into an essay of classification. (See also the guidelines that follow.)

1. Conversations
2. Television commercials
3. Crime
4. Music lovers
5. Wine
6. Martial arts
7. Roommates
8. Bosses
9. Horses
10. Grandparents
11. Education
12. Drugs
13. Novels
14. Lovers
15. Police officers
16. Landlords
17. Slang
18. Marriages
19. Readers
20. Salespersons
21. Handicapped people
22. Parties
23. Families
24. Teachers
25. Success

Process in Writing: Guidelines
Follow at least some of these steps in writing your essay of classification.

1. Write a short outline, since the logic of classifying can be difficult. Once you have chosen the principle on which to classify your topic, decide on the categories. Then ask: Do all relate to the same principle? If not, revise. Do any categories overlap? If so, revise. Have you left out an obvious category? Add it.

2. Write your thesis statement.

3. Now arrange the categories in some climactic order that supports your thesis: smallest to largest, least important to most important, worst to best, etc.

4. Write a rapid first draft, double-spaced, not stopping now to revise or edit.

5. When this draft has “cooled off,” look it over. Does it follow the outline? If not, do the changes make sense? Does every part support the thesis? If not, revise.

6. In your second draft sharpen word choice. Add missing IMAGES or examples. Heighten TRANSITIONS. Cut deadwood.

7. Now edit for spelling and grammar, and write the good copy. Save the essay in case your teacher suggests further revision.

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Privacy

How do you manage your online privacy? Are there certain things you won’t post in certain places? Information you’ll never share online? Or do you assume information about you is accessible anyway?

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Legacy

Write your own poem to honour an ancestor.

You could use the person’s name and relationship to you as the first line of the poem. On the next line, write two adjectives to describe him or her, what he or she did, and a short description of the person’s desires, fears, and loves on following lines.

Use the following poem as a model.

Marcel Lévesque, great-uncle
Brave, adventurous sailor
Wanted to marry a Spanish lady
Feared he would be sent home to Gaspé
Loved his señiorita forever

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Crossword Puzzle: “Who Am I?”

Create a “Who Am I?” crossword puzzle for your group/class.

  • get every person’s name to fit somewhere
  • get at least one descriptive adverb or adjective for each person in the group
  • get at least one favorite activity listed for each person

Example clues:
Across:

  1. a friendly boy, when he’s not playing basketball
  2. Bob’s favorite sport

Use the following, or similar, crossword puzzle maker.

Attach a printable image(jpg or png) of your completed puzzle to a post in your blog.

crossword

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Slow

With half of April behind us, now is as good a time as any to slow things down.

Ready to roll? All you need to do is…

  • Write a new post on your iblog in response to the prompt.

Need more ideas? Not sure what to write around Slow? We’re here to help:

  • Tell us about an activity, chore, or habit most people devote little time to, but that you enjoy lingering on.
  • What’s your favorite slow-cooked food, and what would be lost if you could prepare it in a few minutes?
  • What music, art, or literature do you turn to when you don’t need to rush?
  • Are you a photographer? Share a recent long-exposure shot. Or, if you’re like me and you only have your phone’s camera, take a photo of an object or landscape that channels slowness visually.
  • Write a poem about feeling calm, relaxed, bored, or unproductive.
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A Sunrise on the Veld

Read “A Sunrise on the Veld,” by Doris Lessing

Respond to the Story

  • Describe the boy’s feelings and state of mind before he comes upon the buck. Describe a time in your life when you experienced a similar emotion.
  • Why does the boy not shoot the buck?
  • How does the boy feel at the end of the story? What has caused his mood to change so dramatically?

Poetic Language
The author, Doris Lessing, expresses the boy’s thoughts and feelings very poetically in the two paragraphs before the boy hears the buck’s cries. With a partner, discuss some of these phrases and the images they create. What emotions do the images raise? Is the use of poetic language effective? What types of writing techniques are used?

Using phrases from these two paragraphs, write a poem that expresses the character’s joy at being young and alive. You could draw or find an illustration that captures the spirit of your poem.

(Extra: use any Walt Whitman poem as a model)

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A Job You Have Had

Think of a job you have had.

Write a page of rough notes about it, then, looking these over, decide how socially useful or useless the job was.

Now write an inductive argument showing the evidence for your conclusion.

After a rapid first draft, examine what you have said: Do the examples support your thesis? If not, change your thesis to reflect what you have discovered while writing.

Are your examples fully enough explained to make sense to the reader? If not, elaborate. Or is there deadwood? Trim it out.

Read your second-to-last version aloud to help fine-tune its style.

Read the final version aloud to the class.

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The Replacement Brother

Suppose you have a brother named Jimmy whom you love very much. One day, a crazy magician kills Jimmy, but then instantly replaces him with an exact copy. This copy is the same as Jimmy in every way, including implanted memories of the past. Would you still cry over Jimmy’s death?

According to Plato, you need not, because the copy reflects the form of beauty in the same way. Would you accept the substitute and love it just as you would the original? According to Plato, you should love them equally well. Many find this answer strange and therefore reject Plato’s theory.

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The Quest for Identity

Many feature films contain protagonists who are faced with overwhelming questions relating to personal identity and one’s place in the world. Make a list of recent films that contain such a character. For each film, describe what questions of identity the character faced and explore how those questions were (or were not) resolved. Are there any general observations you can make about the way our culture regards the quest for identity?

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Applying for a Summer Job

Read about the situation below and complete the assignment that follows.

The Situation
Imagine that you are Kim Green applying for one of the four jobs listed below. Robin Thornton is the person at the Hillcrest Job Centre who processes the applications for these jobs.

Summer Jobs Available
Volunteer Jobs

  • Playground Program Assistant – assist with activities for seven-to-ten-year-old children
  • Senior Citizen’s assistant – assist with the needs and activities of seniors in a centre or in the community

Paid Jobs

  • Fast Food Restaurant Employee – prepare food, serve customers, clear tables
  • Landscaping Assistant – plant flowers and shrubs; cut and rake lawns

Assignment
Write a business letter to Robin Thornton in which you apply for the job you have selected. (Select only one from the list above.)

When writing, be sure to

  • identify the job for which you are applying
  • explain what knowledge, skills, or experience you have that might be relevant to the job
  • sign your letter Kim Green – do not sign your own name
  • organize your thoughts appropriately in sentences and paragraphs
  • use vocabulary that is appropriate and effective
  • address the envelope

Note: The information you make up about Kim Green must be realistic for a Grade 9 student. Kim Green lives at 42 Wallaby Way in the city of Springfield, Alberta. Kim Green’s postal code is A3Z 1N9. The Hillcrest Job Centre is also in Springfield: 16961 61st Street, A5T 6P2.

Hint: Advice for ELA 9 Provincial Achievement Test

Download a Template

Rubric

Exemplar:

Job Application Letter from http://www.youth.gc.ca

Job Application Letter from http://www.youth.gc.ca

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Protecting the Nation?

http://www.canadianmysteries.ca

A critical thinking challenge for students, ages 14-18

Introduction

In the spring of 1864 a series of killings sent a chill across Canada. The blood of 14 men, spilled into the Homathco River before dawn on the morning of April 29th, 1864, was only the beginning of this conflict. By the end of May, 19 road-builders, packers, and a farmer were dead. Within six weeks an army of over 100 men had arrived in the area to catch the killers.

The killings took place in a remote triangle in central British Columbia that, at the time, was inaccessible by road or even horse trail. The dead men had all been part of the teams trying to build a road from the Pacific coast to the recently discovered goldfields of the Cariboo.
This area was traditional territory of the Tsilhqot’in people who had lived on the high Chilcotin Plateau for centuries, perhaps for thousands of years. The survivors of the attacks identified the principal leader of the more than 20 people involved in the killings as a Tsilhqot’in chief, who was called “Klatsassin” by his people.

Was this violent conflict an early attempt by First Nations in Canada to assert their legal right to their lands — to their nationhood? Did members of the Chilcotin First Nation kill 17 members of a British road-building crew moving through their territory in 1864 to protect the “national” sovereignty of the Chilcotin nation? Perhaps the motives were more cultural and less political: was it an attempt to protect the Chilcotin culture and way of life from outside forces? Or, as some historians have suggested, were the Chilcotin people lashing out against these non-Natives for reasons that had little to do with politics and cultural preservation?

The Task

In this MysteryQuest, you are asked to take on the role of an historian creating a public monument to commemorate the Chilcotin War of the 1860s. Your main task is to investigate to what extent this war was an attempt to protect a “nation” from invaders.

First, you will examine definitions of “nation” and learn about the two meanings of this term. Then, you will be introduced to the facts of the Chilcotin War. You will refer to an historical overview and maps to get a snapshot of the key events in the group’s history and insight into the relationship between the Chilcotin people and developers who were determined to access the rich resources of the British Columbia interior. You will then examine a number of primary documents from the period, looking for evidence of the Chilcotin motivations for this conflict. Your final task is to prepare a statement on the extent to which this was a war for nationhood. Your ideas will be used by an historical panel investigating the causes of the Chilcotin War to create a plaque commemorating the event.

continue investigation …

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Pairs

Birds in the hand, peas in a pod: today is about pairs.

Ready to roll? All you need to do is…

  • Write a new post on your iBlog in response to the prompt.

Need more ideas? Not sure what to write around Pairs?

  • Pick two people who don’t seem to have much in common — people you know, celebrities, historical figures, fictional characters, up to you! — and write a story about what happens when they’re forced to spend time together.
  • Pair different media in one post: add images to a story, add video to a photo essay, add sketches to a collection of haiku.
  • Tell us about the best meal you’ve ever had, the best trip you’ve ever taken, or the best book you’ve ever read, and pair each one with a song. Bonus points for embedding the songs in your post!
  • Look at your nearest pair of shoes. What stories do the scuffs tell?
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Civil Disobedience

Think of places you know where large-scale civil disobedience and social violence have occurred. Some examples from history are the French Revolution, the American Revolution, the expulsion of the British from countries such as India and South Africa. In what other places have people fought for political change? How was order restored?

Did the restoration of order end the problems that had created the disobedience and violence?

What experiences have people you know or know about had when they fought a government system?

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