Tag Archives: art

List

Who doesn’t like a good list? Let’s make one today.

  • Write a new post on your iblog in response to the prompt.

Need more ideas? Not sure what to write around List? We’re here to help:

  • Write a countdown of your top-ten [insert the category of your choice]. Cookies, sci-fi movies, Disney villains… the possibilities are endless!
  • From Mozart to Dua Lipa (not to mention Billy Joel), list songs have been popular for centuries. Write your own, or adapt an existing one for your new post.
  • Tell a story — fictional or not — using a list as the device that frames your narrative.
  • Create a new playlist of songs that channel your mood today, and share it on your blog. (Bonus points: you can even embed it from YouTube, Spotify, and other services.)
  • Photographers, I’ll be honest: I don’t know what a visual list might look like, but I trust your ingenuity to create something amazing!

Tempo

Let’s think about the word: tempo.

Ready to roll? All you need to do is…

  • Write a new post on your iblog in response to the prompt.

Need more ideas? Not sure what to write around Tempo? We’re here to help:

  • If you’re a photographer, show us a photo that depicts motion. Feeling like you need more of a challenge? Share a series of three photos, showing slow, moderate, and fast motion.
  • We all march to the beat of our inner drummer. Write a post about your default tempo. Are you someone who likes to take the long slow road, stopping to snap photographs and smell all the flowers, or are you someone who prefers to know all the shortcuts to your destination?
  • Musicians: write a short melody, bass line, or chord progression of eight bars. Create three variations on the melody at three different tempos: 60 beats per minute, 90 beats per minute, and at 120 beats per minute.
  • Poets: choose a favorite poem and write about its rhythm. Check out some information on rhythm in poetry and share your analysis in a post.
  • Artists: do a series of three drawings of the same scene, but set your timer! For drawing one, render as much detail as you can in two minutes. For drawing two, use five minutes to draw the same scene. For drawing three: take ten minutes to draw the same scene. Post your work to your blog. Compare the drawings: which decisions did you have to make to be true to the scene in the time allotted?

Instrument

Let’s think about a very versatile word: instrument.

Ready to roll? All you need to do is…

  • Write a new post on your iBlog in response to the prompt.

Need more ideas? Not sure what to write around Instrument? We’re here to help:

  • Do you play a musical instrument? Or multiple instruments? Tell us what inspired you to get started and what keeps you playing.
  • If you don’t play an instrument, is there one that you would like to learn to play if all barriers to it were removed? (When we say barriers, maybe it’s having enough money to buy or rent an instrument, a place to practice in private without disturbing others, or even enough time in the day to focus on learning.)
  • Take a photo of a beloved musical instrument and post it. Tell us what’s special about it.
  • Which songs would you love to learn to play? Why?
  • If you don’t plan an instrument, have you ever day-dreamed of being in a band? What type of music would your band play? Which instrument do you play? Bass? Drums? Piano? Something else entirely?
  • If music isn’t your jam, which tools are instrumental to your hobby? Perhaps it’s the fountain pen you use to draw or the soil in which you’re growing seedlings or a fine piece of wood that will soon become a detailed carving.

Three

Today’s prompt is all about trios, triptychs, and other things that come in three parts.

Ready to roll? All you need to do is…

  • Write a new post on your iBlog in response to the prompt.

Need more ideas? Not sure what to write around Three? We’re here to help:

  • Write about the three objects, books, songs, people, or places that best tell the story of the past year in your life.
  • Share a photo that makes great use of the rule of thirds. (Or, as an alternative, go for an image that showcases three subjects, whether they’re human, inanimate, or something else.)
  • Haiku famously call for three verses. Write a few (maybe… three?) about something you saw on your last walk.
  • Publish a short story or a piece of memoir composed of three sections or vignettes.
  • Think about where you were — geographically, mentally, academically, or any other way — three years ago. What’s the biggest change you’ve gone through during that period?

Distance

Whether your brain thinks in feet, meters, leagues, or lightyears, today let’s think about distance.

Ready to roll? All you need to do is…

  • Write a new post on your iblog in response to the prompt.

Need more ideas? Not sure what to write around Distance? We’re here to help:

  • During this time of physical (and/or social) distancing, what’s the thing you miss the most about being in close proximity to others?
  • What’s the farthest you’ve ever traveled from your hometown, region, or country? Share one thing that you learned in that faraway (for you) place.
  • Distance doesn’t have to be spatial — it can be temporal as well. Write about a period in your life that now feels as if it took place in a different galaxy.
  • Share a photo that stretches far into the horizon, or go to your window and snap a photo that includes the farthest object or structure you can see.
  • Write a story, poem, or imagined dialogue featuring you and a person you were once very close to, but who is now a distant presence in your life.

Slow

With half of April behind us, now is as good a time as any to slow things down.

Ready to roll? All you need to do is…

  • Write a new post on your iblog in response to the prompt.

Need more ideas? Not sure what to write around Slow? We’re here to help:

  • Tell us about an activity, chore, or habit most people devote little time to, but that you enjoy lingering on.
  • What’s your favorite slow-cooked food, and what would be lost if you could prepare it in a few minutes?
  • What music, art, or literature do you turn to when you don’t need to rush?
  • Are you a photographer? Share a recent long-exposure shot. Or, if you’re like me and you only have your phone’s camera, take a photo of an object or landscape that channels slowness visually.
  • Write a poem about feeling calm, relaxed, bored, or unproductive.

Light

Let’s set aside dark and heavy for a day, and focus on light instead.

Ready to roll? All you need to do is…

  • Write a new post on your iblog in response to the prompt.

Need more ideas? Not sure what to write around Light? We’re here to help:

  • Describe the last time you felt positively lighthearted and carefree.
  • Candles, desk lamps, screen glare, the sun: tell us about the light source that you find most conducive to writing.
  • Share a photo with a particularly dramatic arrangement of light and shade.
  • Focus on any of the other (many) meanings of “light,” from “non-serious” or even “frivolous,” to “weightless” or “a prominent person in a specific field.”
  • Poets, you know what to do: stars, feathers, a dusting of snow, or a roaring fireplace are the stuff ballads and haiku are made of.

Art is coming face to face with yourself

Select one of the following quotations and write an essay explaining how one of the texts you have studied does or does not support the quote.

“Art is coming face to face with yourself.” – Jackson Pollock

“When I reflect that the task which the artist implicitly sets himself is to overthrow existing values, to make of the chaos about him an order which is his own, to sow strife and ferment so that by the emotional release those who are dead may be restored to life, then it is that I run with joy to the great and imperfect ones, their confusion nourishes me, their stuttering is like divine music to my ears.” – Henry Miller

“The subject matter of art is life, life as it actually is; but the function of art is to make life better.” – George Santayana

Seeing Beauty

Imagine you are on a tour of an art museum. The guide stops your group in front of a painting, “Isn’t it beautiful?” she asks. You look at your friend Alec and shrug your shoulders. He says, “Whatever.” The guide is determined to get you to agree with her, so she says, “See how bright the colous are.” Alec responds, “I see the colours, but I don’t see the beauty.” The guide grows frustrated: “But, see how energetic the lines are.” Alec responds, “I see the lines, but where is the beauty?” The guide has one last try: “Look at how the composition is balanced.” Your friend says, “OK, I see balance, but I still don’t see any beauty.” Would there be any way to convince him?